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THE 1953 




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STAFF AND DATA JS52-53 



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in 2012 with funding from 

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VENING EDUCATION classes provide scholastic opportunities for area resi- 
', dents. Study-center, day or night, is the beautiful University Library. 





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|HYSICS BUILDING, completed in 1952, houses Departments of Physics 
and Mathematics. School of Music Building will be completed this year. 



RIVING INSTRUCTORS attend a class in safety education. Laboratory in- 
struction is supplemented by visits to industrial, commercial establishments. 



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HHHHHI 

ANEW ERA in University progress — Governor Patteson breaks ground for the 
new Medical Center — expanding the University medical and dental programs. 




MODERN LABORATORIES, equipped with latest scientific instruments 
and specimens, provide practical experience for students of all sciences. 



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WALK from upper to lower campus. Building at right is Elizabeth Moore 
Hall: center of social, recreation, physical education facilities for women. 



NlVERSlTY PLAYERS, the bands, orchestras, glee clubs, and other societies 
I give students opportunity for educational advancement and enjoyment. 




|ODERN EQUIPMENT, like the generators in Electrical Power Labora- 
tory, helps students learn operations and processes by actual practice. 




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EW SWIMMING POOL at Mountainlair, student recreation center, was opened 
in 1951. Swimming facilities for women are located in Elizabeth Moore Hall. 




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ABLE TENNIS tables at Mountainlair are always busy. Mountainlair 
facilities also provide bowling, dancing, music, reading, and a snack bar. 









EALTH of students is guarded by full-time doctors and nurses of Health 
Service. Building has 22-bed infirmary, treatment, and examination rooms. 





IRST and last stop for a student at the University is the Registrar's Office. 
From enrollment to graduation, Registrar handles student's official records. 




FACU 
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LTY ADVISERS, trained in student counseling, are ready to help 
ents with almost any problem. They also help plan study programs. 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



The 1953-54 Catalog 

ANNOUNCEMENTS OF THE 1953-54 SESSION 
STAFF AND DATA OF THE 1952-53 SESSION 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



CORRESPONDENCE 



Correspondence should be addressed as follows. 

ADMISSION 
Registrar 

ALUMNI MATTERS 
Alumni Secretary 

CATALOG, ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Registrar 

EMPLOYMENT OF SENIORS AND ALUMNI 
Placement Bureau 

HOUSING 

On campus: Business Director of Residence Halls 
Off campus men: Office of Off-campus Housing 
Off Campus, women: Dean of Women 

INFORMATION 

Bureau of Information 

MATTERS OF GENERAL UNIVERSITY INTEREST 

The President 

VETERANS AFFAIRS 

Veterans Coordinator 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, MORGAN TOWN, W. \ A. 



SERIES 53, NO. 10 - 1 — WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



APRIL, 1953 



The West Virginia University Bulletin is issued monthly throughout the year. Publi- 
cations included are the Announcements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the 
College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics, the College of Commerce, the 
College of Education, the College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts, the Division of 
Forestry, the School of Journalism, the College of Law, the School of Medicine, the 
School of Mines, the School of Music, the College of Pharmacy, the School of Physical 
Education and Athletics, the Graduate School, the Summer Session and the Evening 
Education Program; the Catalog number; bulletins of the College of Engineering and 
the School of Mines; other scholarly and scientific publications; and the Proceedings 
of the West Virginia Academy of Science. 



CONTENTS 



The Board of Governors 4 

Administrative Officers and Standing Committees 5 

Campus M aps 8 

Part I: General Information 

West Virginia University 13 

University Life 22 

Admission, Registration, Fees 50 

Part II: Curricula and Courses 

The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics 69 

The College of Arts and Sciences ■. 118 

The College of Commerce 200 

The College of Education 211 

The College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts and the School of Mines 243 

The Graduate School 292 

The School of Journalism 298 

The College of Law 309 

The School of Medicine 320 

The Division of Military and Air Science and Tactics 336 

The School of Music 338 

The College of Pharmacy 349 

The School of Physical Education and Athletics 357 

Part III: The Staff 

Alphabetical Fist of Staff 374 

Part IV: Appendix 

Degrees Conferred. 1870-1952 (tables) 395 

Fhe Classified Enrollment. 1952-53 (tables) 398 

Cxeographical Distribution of Enrollment, 1952-53 (table) 401 



Index 



404 



University Calendars 41 q 

3 



The Board of Governors 



TERM EXPIRES 

K. Douglas Bowers, President, Beckley , 1953 

Charles E. Hodges, Vice-President, Charleston 1954 

William G. Thompson, Montgomery 1955 

Raymond E. Salvati, Huntington 1956 

Thomas E. Millsop, Weirton 1957 

Mrs. Paul Hammann, Martinsburg 1958 

E. G. Otey, Bluefield 1959 

T. L. Harris, Parkersburg 1960 

A. C. Spurr, Fairmont 1961 

Irvin Stewart, Chief Executive Officer, Morgantown 
Charles T. Neff, Jr., Executive Secretary, Morgantown 

The Board of Governors has charge of the educational, administrative, financial 
and business affairs of the University and Potomac State School of West Virginia 
University. 



Administrative Officers 



General 



Irvin Stewart, LL.B., A.B., A.M., Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University (1946) . 
Charles Thompson Neff, Jr., A.B., LL.D., Vice-president of the University and 

Comptroller (1946), 1927. 
Edna Arnold, M.A., Dean of Women (1939), 1935. 
Charles Edward Butler, M.A. in L.S., Librarian (1949) . 
Joseph Clay Cluck, B.A., B.D., Director of Student Affairs (1949) , 1943. 
J. Everett Long, M.A., Registrar of the University (1945), 1929. 



Colleges, Schools and Divisions 



Raymond W. Coleman, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Commerce (1952) , 1948. 
Armand Rene Collett, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences (1951), 1924. 
Roland Parker Davis, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Engineering (1945), 1911. 
Ray Oscar Duncan, Ed.D., Dean of the School of Physical Education and Athletics 

(1952) . 
Robert Barclay Dustman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School (1949) , 1924. 
Eston Kermit Feaster, Ed.D., Acting Dean of the College of Education (1952), 1949. 
Thomas Porter Hardman, J.D., Dean of the College of Law (1931) , 1913. 
Weldon Hart, Ph.D., Director of the School of Music (1949) . 

Joseph Lester Havman, Ph.C, M.S., Dean of the College of Pharmacy (1936), 1919. 
John Oliver Knapp, B.S.Agr., Director of the Agricultural Extension Division (1938) , 

1917. 
Walter Allos Koehler, Ph.D., Director of the Engineering Experiment Station 

(1952), 1924. 
Perley Isaac Reed, Ph.D., Director of the School of Journalism (1939), 1920. 
Samuel Roth, Colonel, Infantry, U.S. Army, Head of the Military Division (1949). 
Garold Ralph Spindler, E.M., Director of the School of Mines (1948) , 1934. 
Edward Jerald Van Liere, M.D., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Medicine (1937), 1921. 
Harry Ross Varney, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home 

Economics, and Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station (1950) . 

Heads of Other Administrative Offices 

Roy M. Hawley, A.B., Director, Intercollegiate Athletics (1943), 1935. 
David W. Jacobs, A.B., Director, Bureau of Information; Alumni Secretary (1938). 
Margaret Cornelia Ladwig, Ph.D., Placement Adviser (1949) . 

John Joseph Lawless, Ph.D., M.D., Director, University Health Service (1944) , 1935. 
John Luchok, B.S.J., University Editor (1953), 1950. 

Ernie Bevan McCue, A.B., A.M., Director of University Extension (1952) , 1947. 
Delmas F. Miller, Ph.D., Principal, University High School (1950) , 1949. 
James Meredith Pauley, B.S., Veterans' Coordinator (1949), 1948. 

Mary Rowland Robinson, A.B., Executive Director, Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation (1952) . 
Ruth Eleanor Robinson, A.M., Manager, University Book Store (1944) , 1939, 
William D. Scott, M.S., Director, Mountainlair (1948), 1946, 



ADMINISTRATIVE OEEICERS 



Standing Committees' 

THE UNIVERSITY 



ADMISSIONS: The Registrar and the deans and directors of all colleges and schools 

admitting freshmen. 
BOARD OE GOVERNORS SCHOLARSHIPS: E. J. Holtfr, Edna Arnold, R. H. 

Black. C. H. Gather, J. L. Hall and J. E. Long. 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS: A. P. Dye. 
OFF CAMPUS CONTACTS: M. G. Brooks. R. R. Ashburn. D. H. Bond, J. P. 

Brawner, Susan M. Holdfn. D. W. Jacobs, Ruth D. Nofr. E. W. Welden, and 

Dana Wells. 
PERMANENT BUILDINGS: C. L. Lazzell, R. D. Baldwin. H. M. Gather, R. S. 

Marsh and E. P. Summers. 
SPACE ALLOCATION: R. D. Baldwin. C. L. Lazzell, and J. E. Long. 

THE SENATE 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: President Stewart (chairman), A. S. Abel, H. A. Gib- 
bard, J. E. Long, G. G. Pohlman, C. K. Sleeth, E. C. Jones and E. O. Roberts. 
COMMITTEES: H. A. Davis, Morton Backer, A. D. Longhouse, C. B. Seibert, and 

J. C. Stickney. 
ENGLISH PROFICIENCY BOARD: Q. F. Curtis, J. P. Brawner, T. C. Campbell, 

J. H. Clarke, Earl Hudelson, L. Z. Seltzer, and L. W. Welden. 
EXTENSION: W. W. Armfntrout, P. W. Gainer, J. O. Knapp, E. B. McCue, C K. 

Schlltz, G. R. Spindler, and L. W. Welden. 
INSTRUCTIONAL POLICIES AND PRACTICES: H. A. Gibbard, M. G. Brooks. H. 

M. Gather, R. C. Colwell, M. L. Hobbs, A. E. Singer, and Katherine W. 

Wilson. 
INTER-COLLEGE RELATIONS: R. B. Dustman, and all other deans and directors. 
LIBRARY: H. H. Lapham, J. B. Byers, E. K. Feaster. R. E. Foster. O. D. Lambert, 

J. J. Lawless, and W. R. Ross. 
MEMBERSHIP: W. A. Koehler, L. H. Brown, and W. F. Manning. 
PUBLICATIONS: M. L. \ est, J. O. Buchanan, A. R. Collett, A. W. Goodspefd, 

John Luchok, Helen P. Pettigrew, and F. P. Summers. 
RESEARCH: W. D. Barns, H. W. Ahrenholz, Jr., H. D. Bennett, R. B. Dustman. 

Leo Fishman, J. L. Hall, W. A. Koehler, J. F. Ollom, J. C. Townsend, A. H. 

Van Landingham, H. R. Varney, T. W. Williams, and D. F. Worrell. 
STUDENT AFFAIRS: J. C. Gluck. Members to consist of the \arious chairmen ot 

sub-committees on student affairs as appointed by the President. 
STUDENT ELIGIBILITY: Sam Boyd. Jr., D. H. Bond, J. C. Gluck. J. E. Long, J. G. 

Scherlacher, and Kenneth Wood. 
SIUDENT ETHICS IN ACADEMIC WORK: Mavis A. Mann. R H Black, W. H. 

Jarfcke, B. H. Light, and M. Nadine Page. 
TEACHER EVALUATION: C. C. Spiker, Sara Ann Brown, E. C. Jones, Paul Kra- 
kow ski, and G. E. Toben. 
TEACHER TRAINING: Sara R. Smith. J. P Braunfr. E k. Feaster, Margaret J. 

Fulton, C. W. Hill, E. K. Jerome, B. R. McGregor, D. F. Miller, John Semon, 

and J. K. Stewart. 
1 ENURE AND RETIREMENT: M. E. Lugar, C. M. Erasure, V. J. Lemke, I. D. 

Peters, E. O. Roberts, and J. C. Slack. 
CONVOCATIONS: J. C. Gluck, Weldon Hart, W. F. Manning, L. H. Taylor, and 

Sara R. Smith; student members, Sarah Baughman and Robert Bess. 
DISCIPLINE: K. A. Cook, C. K. Sleeth and Helen P. Pettigrew. 
OFF-CAMPUS SCHEDULES: J. C. Gluck, A. R. Collett, and J. L. Hayman. 
PRIZES, SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS: J. C. Gluck, H. M. Cather, Q. F. 

Curtis, J. E. Long, R. M. White, and Edna Arnold. 



The first-named member serves as chairman. 



STANDING COMMITTEES 



SUBCOMMITTEE ON LOANS: J. C. Gluck, J. H. Clarke, C. L. Lazzell, and E. O. 
Roberts. 

SOCIAL AFFAIRS: J. C. Gluck, A. C. McBride, C. B. Seibert, Dana Wells, Edna 
Arnold, Grace M. Griffin, and Beth Palmer Muffly; student members, Helen 
Britton, Jack Fitzgerald, Walter Spelsberg, and Adelaide Thieroff. 

STUDENT BODY: Pall Bishoff, president; Betty Holroyd Roberts, vice-president; 
James Sottile, Senior Class president; Walter Spelsberg, Senior Class vice-presi- 
dent; James Ryder, Junior Class president; Barbara Shouldis, Junior Class vice- 
president; Hugh Hutchinson, Sophomore Class president; Thomas Potter, 
Sophomore Class vice-president; Ross Ardman, Freshman Class president; Sandra 
Kessel, Freshman Class vice-president. 

STUDENT FEE FUND: J. C. Gluck and Edna Arnold; student members, Paul 
Bischoff, Adelaide Thieroff, and Gordon Thorne. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS: E. L. Core, P. W. Gainer, F. J. Holter, and Mavis 
Mann. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS: P. I. Reed, P. W. Gainer, T. Y. Greet, John Luchok, 
Howard Jeffrey; student members, Eleanor Ellis and John Workman. 

STUDENT RESIDENCES: J. C. Gluck, T. E. Ennis, Kenneth Wood, Edna Arnold, 
May me E. Waddell; student members, George Daugherty and Mary E. Tucker. 

STUDENT SCHOLASTIC RECORDS: L. E. Herod, A. J. Ludwig, Jr., and John 
Semon. 

SUBCOMMITTEE ON NEW RESIDENCES: J. C. Gluck, A. S. Abel, L. R. Gribble. 
Margaret J. Fulton. 



THE MAIN CAMPUS OF WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



TO 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

FARMS 




1. Martin Hall 

2. Experiment Station 

3. Woodburn Hall 

4. Reynolds Hall 

5. Science Hall 

6. Mechanical Hall 

7. Armory 

8. Administration Building 

9. President's House 



111. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 



Heating Plant 
School of Music 
Horticultural Greenhouse 
School ot Medicine 
Oglebay Hall 
Woman's Hall 
Swimming pool bleachers 
College of Law 
Mountaineer Field 



19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 



Music School A 
Chemistry Build 
Field House 
Elizabeth Moore 
Library 
Oglebay Hall Ai 
Men's Hall 
Oglebay Hall Ai 
Alexander Wad< 




28. U. S. Bureau ol Mines Coal Laboratory 37. 

29. Mineral Industries Building 38. 

30. Health Center 39. 

31. Terrace Hall 40. 

32. Home Management House 41. 

33. W. Va. library Commission 42. 

34. Forestry Building 43. 

35. Cafeteria 44. 

36. Mountainlair 45. 



Armstrong Hall 

Brooks Hall 

Spruce Street Building 

Nursery School 

Glasscock Annex 

Plant Pathology Greenhouse 

Physics Building 

Drill Field 

Home Managemeni Apartments 



THE EVANSDALE CAMPUS 




SCALE - FEET 









^ 



Parti 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 

HISTORY 

West Virginia University had its origin in the Congressional Land-Grant 
(Morrill) Act of July 2, 1862, for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic 
arts, and in an act of the State Legislature of October 3, 1863, accepting the con- 
ditions of the Congressional act. In case of a doubt regarding the rights of West 
Virginia Under the act, the Legislature asked that the benefits be extended to 
her. By an act of April 19, 1864, the request was granted, and land-script for 150,000 
acres, most of which were later located in Iowa and Minnesota, was issued to the 
new state. 

On January 9, 1866, the trustees of Monongalia Academy offered to give the 
State all its property, including the site and other property of nearby Woodburn 
Female Seminary, representing a total value of about 551,000, on condition that the 
proposed college '"be located permanently at or near Morgantown." On February 
7, 1867, the Legislature accepted the offer of Monongalia Academy and established 
the "Agricultural College of West Virginia" at Morgantown. 

Government and control of the "Agricultural College" were vested in a Board 
of Visitors composed of one member from each of the State's eleven senatorial 
districts. In response to requests from President Martin, the Legislature, by an act 
of December 4, 1868, changed the name of the "Agricultural College" to "West 
Virginia University." At the same time the name of the controlling body was 
changed from "Board of Visitors" to "Board of Regents." Primarily to serve 
political purposes, the number of regents was changed from time to time to 
1919, when government and control were vested in a state Board of Education of 
five members including the State superintendent of free schools as the ex officio 
chairman. This plan proved unsatisfactory, and an act of April 14, 1927, vested 
control in a Board of Governors of seven members. The number was increased in 1947 
to nine. 

From 1867 to 1895 and even longer, leaders were divided as to whether West 
Virginia should have a State supported university or one "first class" State-supported 
college. With devotees of liberty dominating the situation "the College Plan" was 
favored. Component "departments" and "schools," with the professors generally 
occupving "chairs," functioned autonomously and somewhat provincially. Efforts 
to complv with the Hatch Act (1887) and the Second Morrill Act (1890) brought 
larger viewpoints. As a result President Goodknight, who had traveled abroad, in 
1895 attempted to convert 'the College" into a university. For that purpose "the 
eight Academy Schools, five Technical and Professional Schools, and four Special 
Courses" were organized into four colleges, each with a dean, as follows: Arts and 
Sciences, Powell B. Reynolds; Engineering and Mechanic Arts, William S. Aldrich; 
Agriculture, John A. Meyers; and Law, Judge Okey Johnson. The School of Music 
was established in 1897, a "Summer Quarter" or 'Continuous Session" in 1898, and 
a College of Medicine in 1900. 



14 GENERAL INFORMATION 



Roth the College of Medicine and the Summer Quarter were discontinued in 
1901. Beginning in 1897 the College of Arts and Science* and the College 
of Engineering and Mechanic Arts functioned without deans and through moit oi 
less autonomous departments and schools to 1911 when the deanships were revived. 
In 1902 a semblance of the "Summer Quarter" was revived in the "Summer School" 
which in 1932 became the "Summer Session." The School of Music, having ceased 
to function as such in 1908, was restored in 1909 with a director in charge. 
Alternating between a department and a school organization since 1867, Military 
Science and Tactics became a division in 1913. The arrangement made in 1903 
with the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, for maintaining a University 
College of Medicine proved unsatisfactory. It was discontinued in 1910, and the 
"Medical Sciences" were offered in a department of the College of Arts and 
Sciences to 1912 when the present School of Medicine was established. In 1914 a 
Department of Pharmacy was established in the School of Medicine. In the same 
\ear the Department of Home Economics, previously a unit in the College of 
Arts and Sciences, was transferred to the College ot Agriculture. The Division of 
Agricultural Extension was organized in 1912 and the Division ol Mining and 
Industrial Extension in 1914. 

The building program inaugurated in 1917 brought additional expansions and 
curricular offerings. Among the former were the Engineering Experiment Station, 
1921, and the School of Mines, 1926, which in 1930 became an independent unit. 
In 1927 the courses in education were transferred from the College ot Arts and 
Sciences to the newly-created College of Education, and in 1928 the Division of 
Physical Education was established. Curricular offerings were being improved mean- 
while through additional and better qualified personnel. In January, 1930, the 
Board of Governors established a Graduate School authorized to offer graduate 
degrees in certain indicated fields. 

The Depression (1929-35) slowed expansion somewhat, but progress was re- 
sumed in 1936 when the Department of Pharmacy was discontinued as a unit of 
the School of Medicine and converted into the College of Pharmacy. The next year 
the Division of Physical Education and the Department of Athletics were combined 
into the School of Physical Education and Athletics. At the same time (1937), the 
course in Forestry begun in 1935 as a two-year curriculum in the College of 
Agriculture, was expanded to a four-year course, and the name of the sponsoring 
unit was changed to the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics. 
In 1939 the Department of Journalism was discontinued as a unit in the College 
of Arts and Sciences and became the School of Journalism. The same year a 
Department of Art was established in the College of Arts and Sciences. In 1940 the 
college was further enlarged by the inclusion of a Department of Social Adminis- 
tration, authorized to offer a graduate curriculum leading to the professional Certi- 
ficate of Social 'Work. In 1941 the name was changed to the Department of Social 
Work and in 1944 the Department was authorized to establish an undergraduate 
curriculum in social work leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree. In 1950 the 
Board of Governors authorized the degree of Master of Social Work and approved 
the establishment of a two-year curriculum leading to that degree. In 1944 a four- 
Near course leading to the B.S. (Medical Technology). Degree was approved to be 
given jointly by the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Medicine. In 
1948 the Board of Governors approved an order authorizing the College of Arts 
and Sciences to offer a general course as an integral part of its curriculum and an 
optional lower-division program of studies. 

The University has had thirteen regular presidents, nine acting presidents, 
and one chairman of the faculty. Together with their periods of service, they were: 
Alexander Martin. April 3. 1867-August 12. 1875: Vice-president John Work Scott 
(acting), September 6. 1875-March 27. 1877: John Rhey Thompson, March 28, 
1877-March 12, 1881; Vice-president Daniel Boardman Purinton (acting), March 13. 
1881-1882; William Lvne Wilson, 1882-1883; Robert Carter Berkeley (chairman of 
the faculty), 1883-1885; Eli Marsh Turner, 1885-Julv 21. 1893: Vice President Powell 
Benton Reynolds (acting), July 24, 1893-1895; James L. Goodknight, 1895-August 6, 
1897; (from August 6 to August 10, 1897, Vice-president Robert Allen Armstrong 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 



was nominally acting president) Jerome Hall Raymond, August 10, 1897-1901; Powell 
Benton Reynolds (acting), March 21, 1901-July 31, 1901; Daniel Boardman Purinton, 
August 1, 1901-July 31, 1911; Alexander R. Whitehill (acting). August 1. 1911- 
September 30, 1911; Thomas Edward Hodges, October 1, 1911-August 31, 1914; 
Frank Butler Trotter (acting), July 19, 1914-1916; 1916-1928; John Roscoe Turner, 
1928-December 31, 1934; Robert Allen Armstrong (acting), January 1, 1935-September 
30, 1935; Chauncey Samuel Boucher, October 1, 1935-August 31, 1938; Charles Elmer 
Lawall (acting), September 1, 1938-1939; 1939-August 31, 1945; Charles Thompson 
Neff, Jr., (acting), September 1, 1945-1946; Irvin Stewart, 1946-. 

LOCATION 

West Virginia University is located in Morgantown, Monongalia County, south 
of the Mason-Dixon line where it forms the boundary between northern West 
Virginia and southwestern Pennsylvania. Morgantown is served by the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad, and Capital Airlines. Bus service is provided by the Blue Ridge 
Bus Lines, Osgood Bus Lines, Reynolds Transportation Company, and West Virginia 
Transportation Company. The University community is on West Virginia routes 7 
and 73 and U. S. routes 19 and 119. 

ACCREDITATION 

West Virginia University is a member of the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools. It is accredited by the North Central Association 
and various professional accrediting agencies. 

PHYSICAL PLANT 

West Virginia University's campus comprises 74.35 acres near the center ol 
Morgantown and approximately 260 acres of newly acquired land known as the 
Krepps and Dille farms. In 1951, the Monongalia County Court deeded to the 
University approximately 90 acres which adjoins 55 acres already owned by the 
University. This tract of 145 acres is the site for the new Medical Center, plans for 
which are now being made by architects. The erection of the first building, the 
Mechanical Plant, was begun in 1952. Much of the campus is on high ground 
overlooking the Monongahela River and the surrounding countryside. The physical 
plant includes 47 state-owned buildings or structures on campus, five demonstration 
and experimental farms near Morgantown, four additional experimental farms and 
two agricultural extension centers located at suitable points throughout the state, a 
summer surveying camp for Civil and Mining Engineering students, and a summer 
camp for Forestry students. 

Structures on the main campus, with dates of their completion or acquisition, 
are: Martin Hall, 1870; Wbodburn Hall, 1876; Agricultural Experiment Station, 
1889, present central part being the Armory from 1873 to 1888; Science Hall, 1893, 
Mechanical Hall, 1902: Armory, 1902; Administration Building, "Old Library," 1902: 
President's House, 1905; Heating Plant, 1906; Music Building, 1914; Horticultural 
Greenhouse, 1915: Medical Building, 1916; Oplebay Hall, 1918: Woman's Hall. 1919; 
Plant Pathology Greenhouse, 1920; Law Building, 1923; old Cafeteria, since 1950 the 
"School of Music Annex," 1924; Mountaineer Field. 1925; Hall of Chemistry, 1925; 
Elizabeth Moore Hall. 1928; Field House, 1929; University Library, 1931: Deahl Hall, 
to 1948 the "University Rural High School," 1933: Wings to Woman's Hall. 1935: 
Men's Hall. 1935; Oglebav Annexes, 1933 and 1937; Alexander Wade School. 1939: 
Reynolds Hall, formerly "Commencement Hall" completed in 1893. 1940: Mineral 
Industries Building, 1942; University Health Center, 1942: Terrace Hall, 1942: Home 
Management House, 1942: Library Commission Building, formerly "Health Service," 
1942; Forestry Building, 1946; U. S. Bureau of Mines, formerly "Clay Laboratory," 
1946; Department of Mines Stoker Laboratory, 1946; new Cafeteria, 1947: Mountain- 
lair, 1948; Armstrong Hall, 1950; Brooks Hall, 1950; Physics Building, 1952; and the 
Music Building, to be completed in 1953. The University acquired the nearbv Krepps 
and Dille farms, now known as the Fvansdale Campus, (260 acres) in 1948. 



16 (I NERAL INFORMATION 



The farms, with dates of acquisition, are: Dairy Husbandry Farm, 175 acres 
(1899) and 29.5 acres (1941); Horticulture Farm, 62.5 acres (1916); Animal Hus- 
bandry Farm, 321 acres (191 6^ and 262.5 acres (1941), including a portion foi 
poultry husbandry; Agronomy Farm, 102 acres (1916) (6 acres donated to College 
of Engineering for aeroplane hanger in 1943, 15.7 acres transferred to City of Mor- 
gantown (1946) for runway extension in exchange for 52.3 acres at County Farm); 
total acreage of Agronomy Farm, 132.6 (1947); and Poultry Husbandry Farm, 20 
acres (1916), all near Morgantown; University Experiment Farm at Kearneysville, 
Jefferson County, 158 acres (1930); Reymann Memorial Farms at Wardensville, 
Hardy County, 930 acres (1917) and 57 acres (1943); Reedsville Experiment Farm, 
Preston County, 457 acres (1944); Ohio Valley branch, Mason County, 150 acres (1945); 
Tygart Valley Farm (Forestry) , Randolph County, 495 acres (1949); Camp Russell 
Love Morris (Engineering) , Preston County, 53i/£ acres (1950) . 

The agricultural extension centers, with dates of establishment, are State 4-H 
Camp at Jackson's Mill, Lewis Countv (1921), and the Recreation Center at Oglebay 
Park, Ohio County (1926). 

Approximately 50 acres of mostly wooded land along the west side of the Star 
City Boulevard was set aside in 1948 for growing trees, wild flowers, and other plants, 
and for their display for students of botany, forestry, horticulture, etc., as well as for 
the general public. Footpaths have been constructed to provide access to various 
parts of the Arboretum. 

FUNDS 

Funds for maintaining the University, the Agricultural Experiment Station, 
the Engineering Experiment Station, the Mining and Industrial Extension Division, 
and the Agricultural Extension Division are derived from the following sources: 
(1) interest on the land-grant endowment of $115,300; (2) Federal Morrill-Nelson 
and Bankhead-Jones funds; (3) biennial appropriations by the Legislature; (4) fees 
and tuitions of students; (5) Federal Purnell fund; (6) Federal Hatch fund; (7) 
Federal Adams funds; (8) Federal Bankhead-Jones research fund; (9) Federal Smith- 
Lever and Bankhead-Jones funds; (10) Federal Capper-Ketcham fund; (11) Federal 
Bankhead-Flannagan fund; (12) Federal Research and Marketing fund; (13) tuition 
of high-school students paid by Monongalia County Board of Education; (14) income 
derived from sale of farm and dairy products as well as income from athletics, 
dormitories, dining halls, book store, student activities, etc.; (15) grants by Federal 
agencies for special research projects; (16) contribution by private benefactors for 
the support of scholarships, loan funds, and prizes. 

GOVERNMENT AND ORGANIZATION 

Direction of educational, administrative, financial, and business affairs of the 
University is vested in the Board of Governors. The board is bipartisan and 
consists of nine members who are appointed by the Governor with staggered 
terms of service. 

The University year is divided into two semesters of approximately eighteen 
weeks each and a Summer Session of two terms of six weeks each. 

Acting in an advisory capacity to the President and assisting him in carry- 
ing out established Universitv policies is a Council of Administration, composed of 
the President, the Vice-president, the Registrar, and the deans and directors of all 
colleges and schools, as well as other administrative officers who may be called to 
take part in the deliberations of the Council. 

The University Senate, a legislative body with jurisdiction over all academic 
matters that concern the entire University and all matters that concern more 
than one college or division, is composed of the President, the Vice-president, the 
Registrar, all professors, associate professors, and assistant professors in all colleges, 
schools, and divisions, and all heads of departments. 

The Graduate Faculty, composed of all members who teach courses on the 
graduate level, sets the specific requirements and standards of quality for admission 
to candidacy for graduate degrees and for the award of graduate degrees. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 17 



The Committee on Student Affairs acts as an integral part of the whole 
organization of the University. Its program is bound up with that of the Univer- 
sity as a whole, designed to serve the larger academic and social objectives ot 
modern education. For a list of members see page 6. 

Colleges and Schools 

Organization of the University, together with dates of establishment of the 
various colleges, etc., follows: 

Colleges: College of Arts and Sciences, 1895; College of Law, 1895; College 
of Engineering and Mechanic Arts, 1895; College of Agriculture, 1895; College of 
Education, 1927; College of Pharmacy, 1936; College of Commerce, 1952. 

Schools: School of Music, 1897-1908, 1909; the Summer Quarter, 1898-1900, 
Summer School, 1902-1931, and Summer Session, 1932; School of Medicine, 1912; 
School of Mines, 1926; Graduate School, 1930; School of Physical Education and 
Athletics, 1937; School of Journalism, 1939. 

Divisions: Division of Military Science and Tactics, 1911, Division of Military 
and Air Science and Tactics, 1949; Division of Forestry, 1937; Division of Home 
Economics, 1937. 

Experiment Stations and Research Bureaus: Agricultural Experiment Station, 
1888; Engineering Experiment Station, 1921; Bureau for Government Research. 1931- 
1935, 1949; Division of Documents, 1933. 

Extension Service: Agricultural Extension, 1912; Mining and Industrial Ex- 
tension, 1914; Extension in Education, 1915; Liberal Arts Extension, 1916. 

The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics; the College 
of Arts and Sciences; the College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts; the College 
of Pharmacy; the School of Mines; the School of Music; and the School of Physical 
Education and Athletics are all degree-granting units admitting freshmen. The 
College of Education, the College of Law, the School of Journalism, and the School 
of Medicine are professional colleges and schools requiring from two to three years 
of academic training as a foundation for professional work. All graduate instruction 
is administered by the Graduate Council and the Graduate Faculty. 

A full description of the organization and offerings of the colleges and schools 
of the University is found in Part II of this Catalog. 

Summer Session 

The fifty-fifth Summer Session of the University will be held from June 3 to 
August 21, 1953. The session will be made up of two terms of six weeks each. 

University High School will be in session the first nine weeks tor secondary- 
school student teaching, practice supervision, and observation. The University 
Laboratory Elementary School also will be in session during the first six weeks 
for eleinenlary-school observation and practice supervision. 

Requirements for admission and character of the work offered are the same 
tor the Summer Session as for the regular academic year. 

Credit may be obtained towards the Bachelor's and Master's Degrees in most 
ot the departments and toward the Doctorate in some departments. Offerings 
are varied from summer to summer so that students may complete the work for 
the Master's Degree by attending summer sessions only. 

For complete description of courses, see the Summer Session Bulletin. 

Evening Education 

The University offers a program of evening classes for the benefit of those who 
wish to continue their education beyond the high-school level and who are unable 
to attend the usual day classes. 

All courses are taught by resident faculty members and carry full college residence 
credit. Many of these courses may be counted toward advanced degrees. 



18 GENERAL INFORMATION 



Division of Military and Air Science and Tactics 

(1) Requirements 

a. West Virginia University, a beneficiary of the Act of Congress of 1862, offers 
in time of peace, a four-year and six-week course of instruction in military and air 
science and tactics. Successful completion of the entire course leads to a commission 
as Second Lieutenant in the Officers' Reserve Corps, United States Army or United 
States Air Force. Distinguished Military graduates of West Virginia University 
successfully completing the entire course may apply and be offered commissions as 
Second Lieutenants in the Regular Army or Regular Air Force, under conditions 
prescribed by law. 

b. The course comprises two years of basic (Military Science 1, 2, or Air Science 1, 
2; Military Science 3, 4, or Air Science 3,4), two years of advanced training (Military 
Science 105, 106, 107, and 108; Air Science 105, 106, 107, and 108), and a Summer 
Camp of six weeks duration for Military Science students and four weeks for Air 
Science students during the summer following the junior year. The Summer Camp 
is conducted at government expense, and eligible students are paid $78 monthly in 
addition to traveling expenses at the rate of 5 cents per mile. 

c. All male students not specifically exempt by provisions of the appropriate 
paragraph below are required by chapter eighteen, article eleven, of the official 
code of West Virginia, and by orders of the Board of Governors of the University, 
to complete satisfactorily the entire basic course as prerequisite to graduation 
fiom the University. This work may be taken as enrolled or nonenrolled members 
of the Reserve Officers Training Corps. To be enrolled in R.O.T.C, or A.F.R.O.T.C., 
a student must be physically fit for subsequent service as a commissioned officer of 
the Army or Air Force. Quota limitations for both basic and advanced military and 
air science are set by the Department of the Army and Department of the Air Force 
and cannot be exceeded without special authority. 

d. Within deferment quotas established by Public Law 758, 80th Congress, 
qualified and selected students are deferred by the Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics and/or Professor of Air Science and Tactics from military service under 
the Selective Service Act of 1948 and Selective Service Extension Act of 1950, as 
amended by the Universal Military Training and Service Act, November, 1951, as 
amended, until completion of their academic as well as their military courses, and 
receipt of their Baccalaureate Degree. Such deferment is subject to cancellation 
should the student fail to remain in good standing. 

(2) Curriculum 

a. Basic instruction is given for three hours per week throughout the two semes- 
ters of each school year. Two hours' credit allowed for each semester's work. 

b. The third and fourth years of instruction in Military Science and Air Science, 
corresponding to the junior and senior years of the student, comprise the advanced 
course and are entirely elective on part of the student and highly selective on part of 
the Professor of Military Science and Tactics and/or Professor of Air Science and 
Tactics. Application for advanced training should be made not later than the end 
of the preceeding school year to insure consideration. 

c. All Army military science students follow the same curriculum, except that 
students will attend, following the third year of instruction, the summer camp of 
the branch to which they will be assigned upon receiving commissions. Assignment 
to branch is made by the Department of the Army during the third year of instruc- 
tion based upon the preferences of the student, his personal qualifications, civilian 
occupational and military experience, academic curriculum pursued, and the needs 
of the Army. Three hours' credit is allowed for each semester completed. 

d. Advanced Air Science students follow a common course of instruction for all 
students on the basis of five hours per week. Three hours' credit is allowed for each 
semester completed. 

e. Students with twelve months or more of previous honorable active service 
are eligible to apply for enrollment in the advanced course immediately upon en- 
trance into the University for the fall semester of their junior year. Students with 
less than twelve months service, but more than six, will be eligible to apply for 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 19 



enrollment in the advanced course only upon completion of M.S. or A.S. 3 and M.S. 
or A.S. 4. 

(3) Allowances 

a. Commutation of subsistence, in the amount of the current value of the 
held ration, will be paid monthly to each student taking the advanced course. In 
addition, uniforms are furnished all military students by the government. 

(4) Military Deposit 

Each student must deposit with the Comptroller, at time of registration the sum 
of $10 to cover any loss or damage to Government property while in his possession 
This deposit will be refunded at the expiration of the School term upon return of 
the undamaged property. 

(5) Exemptions 

a. The following students will not be required to enroll in the Division of 
Military and Air Science and Tactics but may elect to do so with the approval of 
the Professor of Military Science and Tactics and/or the Professor of Air Science 
and Tactics: 

(1) Those who are not citizens of the United States and do not intend applying 
for citizenship. 

(2) Those who, at time of entrance, are more than 23 years of age, and 
former students over that age who re-enter the University after an 
absence of three years. 

(3) Graduate students. 

(4) Students whose studies are entirely within the School of Music. 

(5) Students who are taking only the short course, the special interim courses, 
or extension work. 

(6) Students who at time of matriculation have successfully completed not 
less than 58 hours of work, and all who have completed the two-year 
basic Army R.O.T.C or A.F.R.O.T.C. course at an institution maintaining 
a senior unit. Those who have satisfactorily completed one, two, or three 
semesters in a senior unit be allowed comparable credit. 

(7) Students who are unable to perform military duty for physical reasons. 

b. Exemptions will be determined by the adviser from student's records and 
from recommendations of the University physician. 

c. Students with one year or more previous honorable active service are exempted 
from taking basic military training (i.e., Military or Air Science 1, 2, 3, 4) . Students 
with more than six months but less than one year's service are exempted from taking 
the first year of basic (i.e., Military or Air Science 1, 2). But note paragraph 2 c in 
connection with advanced course work. 

(6) Organization 

The Division of Military and Air Science and Tactics and the conduct of 
military training is the responsibility of the Professor of Military Science and Tactics, 
and Professor of Air Science and Tactics who, together with their militarv staffs, 
are officers and noncommissioned officers of the Army and Air Force, appointed by 
the Department of the Army and Department of the Air Force for duty at West 
Virginia University. 

(7) R.O.T.C. Bands 

There is an Army and an Air Force band. Membership is restricted to R.O.T.C. 
students. These bands are drawn from the several schools and colleges within the 
University. Assignment to one of the bands is determined by audition before the 
Director of the Band. 



20 GENERAL INFORMATION 



Library 

The Library of the University originated in the collection of books owned 
by Monongalia Academy when it was transformed into West Virginia University. 

The Library's function is to provide books and related materials for teach- 
ing, research, and cultural purposes. It endeavors to maintain well-balanced col- 
lections in all subject fields included in the curricula of the University. Although 
primarily intended to supply the needs of the faculty and students of the Uni- 
versity, the collections are available to any resident of West Virginia through the 
Library Extension Service Department, which also borrows books from other 
libraries for the use of Faculty members and properly accredited graduate students, 
and makes loans to other institutions. Facilities are also available for the reproduc- 
tion of material by microfilm and photostat. 

The Library contains over 258,000 volumes and some 50,000 maps, besides several 
million pieces consisting of manuscripts, books, papers, and county court records 
relating to West Virginia. Over 1600 periodicals are received currently. The Law 
Library, housed in the College of Law, has over 52,000 additional volumes. 

The Audio-visual Aids Department has about 1,000 educational motion-picture 
films available to members of the University and to groups throughout the state, 
300 film strips, and a collection of musical and speech recordings. 

Except during vacations and holidays, the Library is open from 7:55 a.m. 
to 10:00 p.m., Monday through Friday; from 7:55 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday; 
and from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Sunday. During periods when the University 
is not in session, the hours are from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday; 
9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon on Saturday; closed all day Sundays and holidays. 

University Extension 

The work of this division is under the general supervision of the Director 
of University Extension. The work given in extension courses corresponds in every 
particular to that given in the same courses on campus. Students taking extension 
courses for credit must satisfy fully all requirements for admission to the University 
and, before registering, must file with the Registrar of the University complete 
official transcripts of record. 

The maximum undergraduate credit that may be counted towards any degree 
for extension work conducted by the University is 48 semester hours. The maximum 
undergraduate credit that may be counted towards a degree for extension work 
taken in other institutions is 30 semester hours. No more than 15 hours of work taken in 
graduate extension courses may be counted towards any degree, and of these only 
8 semester hours may be in one field. Education majors are limited to 12 semester 
hours that may be counted toward the completion of the Master's Degree. 

No University extension courses may be offered for credit without the ap- 
proval of the Director of University Extension. Library and laboratory facilities 
for each course must be approved by the Director and, in the case of courses 
for graduate credit, by the Graduate School. Reference books for the use of exten- 
sion students may be borrowed from the University Library upon the order of the 
Director of University Extension, subject to the approval of the Library Committee. 
Postal charges must be paid by the individual or groups for whom the books are 
borrowed. 

A fee of S8 per semester hour is charged for each extension course offered. 

For further information write to the Director of University Extension. 

University Book Store 

The University Book Store, located on the ground floor of the Law Building, 
is owned and operated by the state for the convenience of students and staff mem- 
bers. The Book Store stocks new and used textbooks, general trade books, school 
and office supplies, medical and engineering instruments, and physical education 
equipment. All merchandise, except for price-protected items, is sold to students 
and staff members at a discount price. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 21 



Cafeteria 

The Cafeteria is open tor three meals daily except Saturday and Sunday. 
Dinner is not served on Saturday except on special occasions such as Homecoming 
Weekend and Greater West Virginia University Weekend. Only the noon meal is 
served on Sunday. 

The Cafeteria observes all University holidays. 

ASSOCIATED INSTITUTIONS 

West Virginia Academy of Science 

Organized in 1924 to bring about closer affiliation among scientists of the 
state and to encourage the pursuit of scientific work throughout the commonwealth, 
the West Virginia Academy of Science is a body of nearly five hundred men and 
women who are interested in the service of science in development of the state. Mem- 
bers are widely distributed throughout West Virginia and adjoining states and are rep- 
resentative of colleges, high schools, and industries. A Collegiate Academy and a Junior 
Academy are sponsored by the Senior Academy. Annual meetings, held at the 
various institutions of higher learning, are divided into sections on biology, chem- 
istry, geology and mining, mathematics and physics, education, psychology and social 
sciences. The Proceedings of the annual meetings are published under the auspices 
of the University and the Academy. 

West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey 

The West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey, situated at West Virginia 
University, is governed by its own commission and receives separate appropriations. 

The Geological Survey was founded by an Act of the Legislature in 1897 and 
has functioned consistently since that date. It is recognized as one of the leading 
state surveys. 

One of the major purposes of the Survey is to have members of its staff, 
specialists in their field, investigate all natural resources, and especially mineral 
resources, of the state and make results of the investigations available to the 
public in the form of written reports and maps. 

Accomplishments of the Survey include complete topographic mapping of the 
state on 1-mile-to-the-inch quadrangles; complete geologic mapping of the state 
by counties, and a state geologic map: complete mapping of the soils of the state 
by counties; and the state relief map (scale 1 inch equals 4 miles). 

Numerous special reports also have been made on coal, oil, gas, clays, lime- 
stones and cement, iron ores and building stone, mineral springs, manganese, deep- 
well records, salt brines, rock salt, caverns, and forest and wood industries. 

The professional staff of the Survey is composed of eight geologists, a petroleum 
engineer, two chemists, and a spectroscopist. There is close cooperation between the 
survey and the Department of Geology of the University. Two geologists from the 
U.S. Geological Survey are assigned here for cooperative studies on ground waters. 
The large collection of well cuttings on file brings many petroleum geologists here 
to study them. 

Government of the Survey is vested in the Geological Survey Commission, com- 
posed of the Governor of West Virginia, the State Treasurer, the Commissioner of 
Agriculture, the President of West Virginia University, and the Director of the 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 

West Virginia Biological Survey 

The West Virginia Biological Survey is an organization of voluntary workers 
whose purpose is the collection of information of every kind about the plants 
and animals of the state. 

The executive committee consists of a biologist from each of the colleges 
of the state with a chairman, secretary, and curator. There are no dues, and 
membership is open to all persons interested in the work of the Survey. 



22 GENERAL INFORMATION 



The repository for plant and animal collections is in Brooks Hall, West Virginia 
University, Morgantown, and Marshall College, Huntington. Under direction of 
the Survey a series of publications dealing with biology of the state is being published. 

The Survey, in cooperation with Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
ciuring several summers has maintained one or more field collectors whose work 
has taken them into all parts of West Virginia. An increase in knowledge of 
biological conditions in the state has resulted from this work. 

State Road Commission 

The Materials Laboratory of the State Road Commission is housed in Mechan- 
ical Hall of the University. Its work includes testing of all materials used by the 
Commission and also research on problems of road construction and maintenance 
in West Virginia. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

The following publications are issued regularly at the University: 

1. The West Virginia University Bulletin, issued monthly during the year. 
The series includes the Catalog of the University and the Announcements of the 
various colleges and schools as well as other occasional publications. 

2. The bulletins and circulars of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

3. The circulars of the Agricultural Extension Service, including Farm Women's 
Club leaflets, 4-H Suggestions, Treasures of the Trail, West Virginia Farm News 
(in cooperation with the West Virginia Farm Bureau), and special pamphlets. 

4. Agricultural News Service bulletins published weekly by the College of 
Agriculture. 

5. The bulletins of the Engineering Experiment Station and of the School 
of Mines 

6. The West Virginia Law Review, official publication of the West Virginia 
Bar Association, edited by the faculty of the College of Law. 

7. Miscellaneous publications under the title of Philological Papers or Bio- 
logical Studies. 

8. The Student Directory, annual directory of the student body, published by 
the University Book Store. 

9. The annual Proceedings of the West Virginia Academy of Science. 

10. The West Virginia fourth Estatesman, a quarterly publication edited by the 
faculty of the School of Journalism. 

UNIVERSITY LIFE 

STUDENT WELFARE 
Director of Student Affairs 

The activities of student welfare are under the administration of the Director 
of Student Affairs. The Director's office is on the second floor of the Administration 
Building. 

Dean of Women 

All interests of women students in the University are in charge of a special 
executive officer of the University, the Dean of Women. The Dean's office is on 
the main floor of Elizabeth Moore Hall. 

Eligibility for Activities 

To be eligible to represent the University in public appearances, a student must 
be enrolled in the University and must meet the eligibility requirements of the 
department or school in which the activity originates. The records of those students 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 23 



whose status is questionable should be checked at the Registrar's Office before partic- 
ipation. This checking should be done by the department or school in question. 

To hold an elective or appointive office in any duly recommended student 
organization, a student must be enrolled in the University for at least 12 semester 
hours and, if in other than his or her first semester in residence, must have maintained 
a minimum average of "C" the last previous semester in the University. 

The rules and the policies of the Southern Conference govern participation in 
intercollegiate athletics. 

ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS 

All women students of the University are members of Associated Women Stu- 
dents. The purpose of this association is to regulate all matters pertaining 
to the student life of its members; to further in every way a spirit of friend- 
liness and unity among the women of the University; to increase their sense of 
responsibility; and to be a medium for maintaining high scholastic and social 
standards. 

Responsibility for directing the work of the Association rests with the Execu- 
tive Council, which is composed of the following members: a president, two vice- 
presidents, a secretary, a treasurer, and a representative from each class. These 
officers are elected annually by the Association. To be eligible for membership on 
the Executive Council, a woman must have no less than a "C" average in all her 
work. 

In 1921 the Association was admitted to active membership in the intercol- 
legiate Association of Student Government for Women Students. 

MOUNTAINLAIR 

Mountainlair, the student center, was opened on May 14, 1948, to provide members 
of the University with a general recreational center. 

Mountainlair is a remodeled Navy recreation building, situated at the northeast 
end of Mountaineer Field. It contains a large snack bar, four bowling alleys, a lounge 
with newspapers and magazines, an activities or meeting room, office space, and a 
huge ballroom used for such activities as table tennis, badminton, shuffleboard, dances, 
and special student functions. A smaller upstairs ballroom is used for small dances, 
movies, style shows, etc. 

The Mountainlair Swimming Pool was opened in August, 1951. The pool is 
42 by 75 feet, the regulation intercollegiate size. Adequate recreational swimming 
hours are provided for all persons having a Mountainlair identification card. 

The Mountainlair staff devotes its full time to making a pleasing atmosphere for 
students' recreation and to setting up an adequate program designed to fit many 
individual needs of students on campus. The activities at Mountainlair are planned 
by the students with the coordination of a Social Director. 

The building is open from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 
7:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Sunday. 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS 

The University maintains three dormitories, one for men and two for women. 
For information as to accommodations and rates, address the office of the Director 
of Residence Halls. Cost of room and board will be determined later. 

The following rules are in effect: 

No student will be permitted to live in other quarters until after Men's 

Hall and dormitories for women are fully occupied. 

In assignment of rooms in these buildings all freshmen shall be required 

to take rooms therein before members of any other classes shall be assigned 

rooms therein, no freshman being allowed to live outside the dormitories 

if there is room in them.* In enforcing the above rules, the following 

exceptions shall be made: 

•In dormitories for women, rooms are assigned to freshmen, sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors. 



24 GENERAL INFORMATION 



(1) When the parents or legal guardians of students reside in Mor- 
gantown or within commuting distance of the University, these rules shall 
not apply. 

(2) When the home of the student is within such distance that it is 
entirely practicable for him to live in his home and reach the University 
by car or otherwise for all his classes, these rules shall not apply. 

A student who does not claim exemption for the fall semester to 
live with relatives, cannot claim exemption for the second semester un- 
less the parents in the meantime have moved to Morgantown. 

(3) When students above the rank of freshman reside in approved 
sorority or fraternity houses under the supervision of the Director of Stu- 
dent Affairs and the Dean of Women, these rules shall not apply. 

(4) When conditions of emplovment (such as firemen in various build- 
ings and homes, employment on dairy and experimental farms, etc.) re- 
quire residence on the premises, these rules shall not apply. Students so 
employed should not request dormitory reservations. 

When space is needed for underclass women, no senior sorority woman will 
be permitted to live in Woman's Hall if there is room for her in her sorority house. 

Because of the shortage of dormitory space, rooms are assigned only to students 
whose homes are in West Virginia. Assignments are for the entire academic year. 
Students cannot be released at the end of the first semester to live elsewhere. Men's 
Hall is reserved for freshmen. 

More detailed information may be found in the Residence Halls Bulletin, a copy 
of which will be furnished by the office of the Director of Residence Halls. 

Board and lodging for women graduate students is available in private dwell- 
ings in Morgantown. Board and lodging for men also is available in private 
dwellings. For information concerning rooms in homes on the approved list, men 
should address the Office of Off-Campus Housing, West Virginia University, Mor- 
gantown. Women should communicate with the office of the Dean of Women, 
West Virginia University, Morgantown. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 
Service Programs for Men and Women 

Two hours of physical education for men, P.E. 1 and 2, to be taken during the 
first year in residence; and four hours of physical education for women selected from 
P.E. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, or 57 to be taken during the first 
and second year in residence, are required for graduation of students presenting fewer 
than 58 hours unless previous credit has been allowed. Upper division students who 
wish to elect a Physical Education course or who have not completed the Physical 
Education requirement, should select from the following: P.E. 101, 102, 103, or 104. 

Each student who is required to register for physical education is given a 
complete medical and phvsical examination at the beginning of the University 
school year to determine his fitness for active participation in University activities 
of any description. See Part II for more extended information on the course 
offerings of these departments. 

Intramurals 

A broad intramural sports program for men and women is provided by the 
School of Physical Education and Athletics. It is the aim to encourage all students 
of the University to participate in organized athletic sports and wholesome 
active recreation. Competition is promoted between student groups and individuals. 
Such natural groupings as classes, fraternities, sororities, dormitories, and other non- 
fraternity units form the basis for activities in competitive sports. 

The following activities are conducted for men in the Intramural program: 
speedball, touch football, tennis, volleyball, handball, basketball, swimming, relays, 
golf, bowling, basketball free throwing, softball, horseshoes, and outdoor track. Other 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 25 



activities may be organized when there is sufficient interest on the part of students 
and when facilities permit. Leagues are organized to accommodate fraternities, 
dormitories and nonfraternity groups. 

The following activities are conducted for women: horseshoes, volleyball, bad- 
minton, swimming, basketball, foul throwing, bowling, softball, archery, and tennis. 
Interclass tournaments for Physical Education majors are held in the following activi- 
ties: volleyball, badminton, basketball, swimming, tennis, and softball. As the demand 
for more activities develops, the facilities will be increased and the program broadened. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Activities of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics are administered by 
the Director of Intercollegiate Athletics and by the Athletic Council. The council 
is composed of eight members: four faculty, two alumni, one student, and one 
member of the Board of Governors (ex officio). The Dean of the School of 
Physical Education and Athletics serves as a member, and the Director of Athletics 
is the executive officer. Instruction and training are given each year in the 
seasonal sports such as football and cross-country; basketball, and wrestling; base- 
ball, track, tennis, rifle, and golf. Matters concerning athletic eligibility regulations are 
decided by the Athletic Council, and scholastic eligibility regulations are established 
by the faculty of the University. 

THE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE 

The University Health Service, which is a part of the organization of the 
School of Medicine, is maintained to provide medical care to students of the 
University and to supervise general health conditions on campus. The staff includes 
four full-time physicians, six nurses, laboratory technicians, and clerical personnel. 
The University Pharmacy, housed in the Health Center, is managed by the College 
of Pharmacy. The Departments of Pathology and Bacteriology cooperate in the 
laboratory examination of diagnostic materials. 

The Health Service occupies a well-designed University Health Center con- 
structed in 1942. This three-story building is centrally located on campus, fronting 
on College Avenue adjacent to Reynolds Hall. It is built of brick and concrete 
and is fireproof throughout. On the first floor are the treatment rooms, offices, 
and pharmacy. The second floor is occupied by laboratory and X-ray depart- 
ments, together with the Department of Pathology. The third floor contains a 
well-equipped Infirmary. 

The Health Service is in operation from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily except 
Saturday and Sundays. Saturday hours are 8:00 a.m. to noon. Physicians are in 
attendance from 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 M. and 2:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. A nurse is present 
at all times in the Infirmary, and a University physician can always be reached by 
calling the Health Service, Extension 323 on the Universitv exchange. 

Each regularly enrolled University student pays a fee which provides for 
medical consultation and advice from Universitv physicians. Moderate additional 
charges are made for room calls, X-rays, laboratory tests, minor operations, treat- 
ment of fractures, and drugs furnished by the Health Service or Pharmacy. 

On his first enrollment in the University a student receives a complete 
physical examination which includes a blood test and urinalysis. The Health 
Service also gives special physical examinations to students in competitive athletics, 
to Universitv food handlers, to employees of the Buildings and Grounds department, 
and to other groups as occasion may arise. 

University Infirmary 

Students who need bed care for medical illness are hospitalized in the Uni- 
versity Infirmary. The Infirmary is open only to full-time students of the Uni- 
versity. It is the policy of the Health Service to have all students requiring 
such care in the Infirmary, and they will not ordinarily receive continued care 
elsewhere. Students hospitalized in the Infirmary are under the care of Health 



26 GENERAL INFORM \ I ION 



Service physicians, although other qualified physicians may be seen in consultation 
when necessary. Patients will be admitted and discharged on the order of Health 
Service physicians. 

Upon admission to the Infirmary the student receives two days of hospital- 
ization without charge except for laboratory, X-ray, special medications, and private 
duty nurse fees. No additional charge is made for general nursing care, dressings, 
routine medications as commonly supplied by the Health Service, and food as ordered 
by the physician in charge. Laboratory examinations, X-rays, penicillin, and similar 
medication will be charged at the usual Health Service rate to students. Special 
nurses, when necessary, are at the expense of the student. 

A student may receive not more than thirty days hospitalization for any one 
illness. Patients are to leave when discharged by the University physician. When 
it becomes evident that a student's illness will be so prolonged as to prevent his 
completing work of the current semester, he may be discharged from the Infirmarv 
when the attending physician or the Director of the Health Service considers that 
he may be moved without undue danger to his health. The services as indicated 
above' are subject to the availability of space in the Infirmary. Twenty-two beds 
are at present ready for use. 

Speech and Hearing Rehabilitation Clinic 

The Speech and Hearing Rehabilitation Clinic, which is operated under the di- 
rection of the Department of Speech, offers its services to all students of the University 
in need of treatment for various types of speech disorders such as stuttering, cleft 
palate, aphasia, spasticity, deafness, hard-of-hearing, etc. All work is in charge of 
a professionally trained and fully qualified speech clinician who has been certified 
for this type of work by the American Speech and Hearing Association. The clinic 
is located in the specially designed set of rooms which permits private as well as 
class instruction, the use of soundproof cubicles, modern equipment for diagnosis and 
therapy, and opportunities for supervised and directed help in overcoming speech 
handicaps. 

UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 
Social 

Student social life in the University is a carefully planned and supervised part 
of a student's life on campus. It is guided in such a manner as to offer a whole- 
some type of pleasure without curbing the institution's main purpose— education of 
the student body. 

All social life is under general supervision of the Committee on Social Affairs. 
The committee has supervision of every social function given by the University or 
by an organization within it, including fraternities, sororities, and other student 
societies. 

The social program is highlighted during the year by Homecoming Weekend, 
Mountaineer Weekend, and Graduation Week. The Torchlight Parade held during 
Homecoming Weekend is fast becoming an annual tradition. Homecoming 
Dance, of course, is the climax of the celebration. Mountaineer shenanigans 
on a special fall weekend, set aside by students, is the most newly established 
annual affair. Mountaineer garb in its truust fashion, prevails at all activities for 
the two-day program, including classes on Saturday mornings. Mountaineer music, 
hayseed hoedowns, simulated Hatfield- McCoy fueds, and other attractions provide 
everyone with a gala time. 

The outstanding social event of Gradual ion Week is the Senior Ball which 
brings the undergraduate's social life to a climactic end. 

Other major dances include the Militarv Rail, Engineers' Rail, and Gold-diggers' 
Ball. 

Aside from these major social attractions, there are many others scheduled 
for weekends throughout the year. A number of these activities are sponsored by 
individual organizations; some have a limited attendance and others are all-campus 
affairs. 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 



SOCIAL CENTER FOR WOMEN 

On the upper campus, opposite Reynolds Hall, is Elizabeth Moore Hall, named 
after the preceptress at the former Woodburn Female Seminary. The building 
provides for social, recreational, and physical education activities for women stu- 
dents. The building is so arranged that facilities for social gatherings constitute 
a separate unit. 

Cultural 

The University through the Committee on Convocations and Public Exercises 
provides appropriate and desirable programs for students. These convocations 
form the basis of the cultural program, but there are others sponsored by various 
divisions of the University and community. 

Convocations consist of addresses bv distinguished speakers, and musical and other 
entertainment features of special merit. 

During the vear students have an opportunitv to attend their own legitimate 
theatre in which plays are presented by the Speech Department. University Radio 
Theatre is alsr an activity of the Speech Department. 

The University-Community Symphony Concert, individual recitals, and glee club 
concerts are sponsored by the School of Music. 

The Community Concert Series is another fine opportunity afforded to stu- 
dents. 

A broad student fellowship program is available at the many churches in the 
community and a special week is set aside annuallv as Life Week to emphasize the 
religious phase of student life. 

Greater West Virginia University Weekend makes a number of cultural activ- 
ities available to students and their visiting parents. A modern dance recital, 
music recitals, religious services, and educational scientific exhibits are of the 
highest value. 

FORENSIC ACTIVITIES 

The University maintains a complete forensic program under sponsorship and 
direction of the Department of Speech. Intramural and intercollegiate activities 
in debate, oratory, and extemporaneous speaking are included. Speech tournaments, 
trips, and tours as well as campus contests make up the program. Participation 
may lead to membership in Delta Sigma Rho, national honorary forensic fraternity, 
and is open to any regularly enrolled student in the University. 

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS 

The University Players, sponsored by the Department of Speech, presents a full 
program of major productions, open to the public, each year. In recent years such 
plays as The Little Foxes. Angel Street, BlxlJie Spirit, The Man Who Came to Dinner, 
Hedda Gabler, Craig's Wife, High Tor, Comedy of Errors, and Winterset have been 
given. A program of one act plavs performed in a studio theatre atmosphere is pro- 
duced each year by students enrolled in theatre courses. Tryouts for casts of all pla)s 
are open to am regularly enrolled student in the University. Membership in Alpha 
Psi Omega, national honorary dramatic fraternity, may be earned by superior work 
in such productions. 

UNIVERSITY BROADCASTING 

Broadcasting of radio programs to the people of West Virginia was established 
at the University in May 1938, when Station WMMN, Fairmont, began a series of 
noncommercial programs originating on the campus. All are of an educational, in- 
formative, or entertaining nature. In addition to these programs, special events have 
been carried from time to time over numerous West Virginia stations; athletic events 
have been broadcast regularly by a group of West Virginia stations as well as by stations 



28 GENERAL INFORMATION 



in other states. Members of the announcing classes receive actual station experience 
at the local station, WAJR, Morgantown. 

The University is prepared to open its doors to all West Virginia stations that 
wish to broadcast special campus events. 

University Radio Theatre. Every week a half-hour radio show is broadcast 
over Station WMMN, Fairmont. Produced by University Radio Students, the 
series is directed by the radio faculty of the Department of Speech. The cast 
and technical crew are composed primarily of students of radio in the Depart- 
ment of Speech but auditions are arranged at the beginning of each week for 
other students on campus who might be interested in getting radio experience. The 
radio dramas and documentary scripts which are used on these broadcasts are 
written by students of radio or are secured from famous network authors. 

RELIGIOUS FOUNDATIONS AND ASSOCIATIONS 

Foundations 

As at most state university centers, various state and national church boards 
have established foundations at West Virginia University for the religious educa- 
tion and nurture of students. The churches of Morgantown extend a warm welcome 
to students of all faiths. The physical plant and equipment of each church is 
available for social, educational, and recreational activities of students. 

The Baptist Student Fellowship headquarters are at the Baptist Student 
Center, 640 N. High Street, under the administration of the Rev. Parker Bur- 
roughs, student pastor. The program includes participation in Bible School, worship 
services of the church, B.S.F., and service in mission churches in nearby districts. 
Student activities are democratically organized and depend in large measure on student 
initiative and leadership. 

Newman Hall, 1481 University Avenue, is the social and religious center es- 
tablished by the West Virginia Diocese of the Roman Catholic Church for stu- 
dents of that and other faiths. Rev. Eugene Schmitt is the resident chaplain. 
Newman Hall is a beautiful building of English collegiate architecture immediately 
adjacent to the campus. It is equipped with dormitory facilities for twenty stu- 
dents and also includes a chapel, dining room, lounge, game room, and library. 

The Disciple Student Foundation provides a program for Christian Church 
students attending West Virginia University. The Foundation is sponsored by the 
Department of Religious Education of the United Christian Missionary Society 
(Indianapolis, Ind.) , the West Virginia Christian Missionary Society (Huntington, 
W. Va.), and the First Christian Church of Morgantown. These three agencies 
function through a Student Work Advisory Committee. The First Christian Church 
is the center for Foundation activities and is located at 447 Spruce Street. The Rev. 
Benton Roy Hanan is director of the Foundation and pastor of the Church. 

Trinity Church. Spruce Street, is the center for student work sponsored by 
the Diocese of West Virginia of the Protestant Episcopal Church. This work is under 
the direction of the rector, Rev. Harold M. Wilson. The program includes corporate 
student worship services and meetings of the Canterbury Club, which is one of the 
National Association of Canterbury Clubs, for discussion and fellowship. Canterbury 
Club meets in Strider Hall, which is located on the ground floor of Trinity Church. 

The Hillel Foundation at West Virginia University, 1420 University Avenue, rep- 
resents the combined efforts of the West Virginia B'nai B'rith Lodges and of the 
National B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation to bring the University's students to- 
gether in religious, cultural, and social activities. Prominent lecturers and speakers 
are featured at regular intervals bv the Found: .ion for the members of the group and 
for the general student body. 

St. Paul's Lutheran Church is the center of Lutheran student activities sponsored 
by the Student Service Commission of the National Lutheran Council, the Synod 
of West Virginia, and St. Paul's Lutheran Church. This work is under the direc- 
tion of the Rev. W. Roy Hashinger, local pastor. The program includes regular 
services of the church and activities of the Lutheran Student Association. 

Wesley Foundation is housed in the Methodist Student Center at 503 High 
Street and provdies a worship and activities center for Methodist students in the 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 29 



University. Complete facilities for recreation, feeding, drama, and various religious 
meetings are provided as an integral unit of Wesley Methodist Church. The students 
are organized into a working cabinet, and carry forward a religious education program 
consisting of worship, study, fellowship, community service, mining camp missions, and 
other extension activities. The program is under the direction of Dr. Thomas LeRoy 
Hooper, pastor of Wesley Church, and Roy E. Oldham, Director of the Youth Center. 
The Foundation sponsors Kappa Phi, Methodist women's sorority, and Sigma Theta 
Epsilon, Methodist men's fraternity. 

The Westminister Foundation of West Virginia represents the cooperative efforts 
of the Boards of Christian Education and National Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A., the Synod of West Virginia of the Presbyterian Church, U.S., and the 
Presbytery of Winchester, to make the Christian religion a vital factor in the experi- 
ences of students and in the relationships which these students sustain while in the 
University; and also, through guided Christian activities in the mine-camp communi- 
ties surrounding Morgantown" to train among educated men and women future 
Christian statesmen. The Rev. Wm. C. Swartz, 304 Willey Street, is the student 
pastor and director. 

Other churches, while not having special buildings or workers for Univer- 
sity students, make definite contributions in ministering to the religious and social 
needs of University students who belong to their particular faiths. It should be 
stated in this connection that college students are welcome in all of our churches 
regardless of what their church affiliations may be, or indeed, whether they have any. 

ASSOCIATIONS 

The Young Men's Christian Association of West Virginia University is a non- 
sectarian fellowship of students and faculty united in the desire to encourage 
personal and social development in the light of religious principles. The Young 
Women's Christian Association is a nonsectarian fellowship of women of the 
Universitv organized for the purpose of promoting and directing widely varied 
activities through a religious motive. Both Associations are affiliated with their 
na'ional and international bodies and with the World Student Christian Federation. 

Student officers, student cabinets, boards composed of students, faculty, and 
townspeople, and an executive secretary direct the activities. The various com- 
mittees, interest groups, and commissions provide not only their immediate ends, 
but also opportunitv for fellowship and leadership training. The Y.M.C.A. office is 
located on the third floor of the Administration Building and the Y.W.C.A. 
office is located on the second floor of Elizabeth Moore Hall. Miss Mary Robinson is 
executive director of the Y.W.C.A. 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

The University-Community Symphony Orchestra 

The University-Community Svmphony Orchestra is open to all students, faculty 
members, and citizens of the community who are proficient in the playing of an 
orchestral instrument. The repertoire is that of the standard symphony orchestra, 
with special emphasis on contemporary American music. 

The functions of the orchestra are to provide the University and community 
an opportunity to hear symphonic music, to enable the student to gain orchestral 
experience, and to serve as a laboratory for student composers, orchestrators. and 
conductors. Four or five conceits are given each year on campus, and additional 
programs are presented in other cities in West Virginia and Pennsylvania. 

Rehearsals are held each Wednesday in the School of Music Annex. One hour 
of credit per semester may be earned. 

Women's Glee Club 

The Women's Glee Club is open to all University women who can sing a 
part acceptably. The organization affords an opportunity for women students to 
become acquainted with the best in choral literature, both classic and contem- 
porary. It performs for various University functions in addition to presenting 
concerts both on and off campus. 



30 GENERAL INFORMATION 



Rehearsals are held each Thursday at 7:00 p.m. in Reynolds Hall. One hour 
of credit per semester may be earned. 

Men's Glee Club 

The Men's Glee Club is open to all University men who can satisfactorily 
sing a part. Concerts are given several times through the school year on campus 
as well as out of town. 

Rehearsals are held each Thursday at 7:00 p.m. in room 21 Mineral Industries 
Building. One hour of credit per semester may be earned. 

University-Community Mixed Chorus 

The University-Community Mixed Chorus is open to all University students 
who can satisfactorily sing a part. Concerts are given several times through the 
school year. This organization offers opportunity for the study of much choral 
literature. 

Rehearsals are held Monday at 7:00 p.m. in the School of Music Annex. One 
hour credit per semester may be earned. 

The University Bands 

The University Bands are composed of students drawn from all classes of the 
various colleges and schools of the University. The Mountaineer Marching Band 
provides music and pageantry for athletic events, parades, and the like. The Concert 
Band gives several concerts each year in Morgantown and in nearby cities. 

After completing two years in the band, especially qualified bandsmen may con- 
tinue service in the band upon invitation and receive allowances in the form of re- 
mission of fees amounting to $30 per semester. 

Regular rehearsals are held on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday afternoons at 5 
o'clock in the School of Music Annex. One hour of credit per semester may be earned. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Daily Athenaeum, University student newspaper, is published daily Tuesday 
through Saturday, by students of the School of Journalism. Heads of the editorial 
and business staffs are appointed by the University Committee on Student Publica- 
tions from a list of eligible students certified by the Director of the School of 
Journalism. 

The Monticola, student yearbook of the University, is usually published by upper- 
classmen. The editorial and managerial staff is appointed by the University Com- 
mittee on Student Publications. 

Moonshine, student humor magazine, is published by a staff appointed by the 
University Committee on Student Publications. 

Mountain Guide, formerly called the Freshman Handbook, is published annually 
under the direction of the University Office of Publications and is distributed to 
each member of the entering class and to transfer students. 

All student publications of general campus circulation are under the supervision 
of the University Committee on Student Publications. 

GIFTS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 

Several individual, as well as national patriotic, educational, fraternal, and 
religious organizations, have established scholarships, loan funds, prizes, trophies, 
and medals for students in the University. 

Gifts 

Carnegie Corporation Music Collection. Thanks to the generosity of the 
Trustees of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, West Virginia University in 
1936 received as a gift, designed to stimulate and develop an interest in music 
culturally on the part of the entire student body, a Music Collection that cost the 
corporation $2,500. The set includes: 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 31 



An electric phonograph of special design for use in small rooms and audi- 
toriums; approximately nine hundred records, chosen as an anthology of recorded 
music, ancient and modern, from oriental and occidental countries; an oak cabinet 
with approximately seventy-five buckram albums in which to keep the records; 
a duplicate set of printed three-inch by five-inch indexes of all records in the 
set, classified by composers, titles, mediums, forms, etc.; bound copies of full scores, 
when published in miniature, also bound vocal scores of operas and oratorios, which 
are included for all completely recorded works in the set; lastlv, a selection of 
about one hundred books on musical subjects, historical and biographical, and 
works of reference. 

This Music Collection is attractively housed in the Library and its use is ad- 
ministered under regulations designed to make it of greatest possible value to the 
students of the University. 

Grants 

Frederick Gardner Cottrell Grant. The Research Corporation granted $1900 to 
West Virginia University Department of Chemistry for the support of a research 
project entitled, "The Chemistry of Organoboronic Acids and Their Derivatives." 

The Sears-Roebuck Foundation has granted to the Agricultural Experiment 
Station, beginning in 1944 to the present, 826,300 for subsidizing a hillculture 
project, which is designed to increase income of the farm family. 

Scholarships 

American Bankers Association Foundation for Education in Economics Loan 
Scholarships. The American Bankers Association Foundation for Education in 
Economics has assigned to West Virginia University three scholarships of $250 
each. These scholarships will be "awarded only to deserving students of integrity, 
intelligence, character, competency, and aptitude, whose means of support are 
dependent wholly or in part on their own labor, to enable them to continue the 
study of courses in banking and economics in classes of junior grade or above. 
Scholarship of the highest rank will not be a definite requirement for a loan 
scholarship award; however, the Foundation desires to encourage students who will 
become leaders in professional or business life and does not wish loan scholarships 
granted to mediocre or inferior students." The holders of these scholarships are 
eligible for one reappointment. The loan is without interest until the first day 
of the second January after the recipient leaves the University. Beginning on that 
date interest accrues at the rate of 5 per cent per year, and repayment of both 
principal and interest in sums of no less than S10 monthly must likewise then 
begin. 

The Board of Governors Scholarships. On April 5, 1945, the Board of Gov- 
ernors of West Virginia University authorized the establishment of twenty-five 
scholarships to be awarded annually to high-school graduates. The first awards 
were made for the academic year 1946-47. The scholarships entitle recipients to 
remission of all fees, except those payable to state special funds and those charge- 
able to Special Services. Awards are made on the basis of (1) scholastic attain- 
ment, (2) citizenship, loyalty, and personality, (3) character and leadership, and 
(4) extra-curricular abilities. Applications for these scholarships are made through 
the Board of Governors' Scholarship Committee and scholarships are awarded on 
recommendation of the committee and on approval by the Board of Governors. 
Scholarships remain in effect for four academic years unless revoked for disciplin- 
ary reasons, for failure to maintain scholastic standard, or because of withdrawal 
from the University. 

Scholarships in Music. In Julv, 1950, The Board of Governors established 
five annual scholarships in music. Each scholarship includes four academic 
years and entitles the recipient to the remission of all fees (including contingent 
and tuition fees, special fee of S35.00, and special instrument practice fee), 
except those payable to State Special Funds and those chargeable to Special Services. 
Those eligible to take part in the contests will be West Virginia high school seniors 



32 GENERAL INFORMATION 



who give promise of becoming eligible for regular enrollment in the School of Music 
of West Virginia University as candidates for a degree in applied music. Preliminary 
and final contests will be held in Morgantown on the campus of West Virginia Uni- 
versity and the dates will be announced. 

Victor E. Albright Scholarship. This scholarship is worth $200 per year and 
is to be awarded "to a boy or girl of good character, of fair health and of the 
White race, who was born and reared in Preston county and who graduated from 
a high school of Preston county in the year in which the scholarship is given." 

West Virginia Interscholastic Forensics Scholarships. In February, 1950, there 
were established five West Virginia University scholarships, two in debate, and one 
each in oratory, extempore, and interpretative reading, to be awarded annually to 
graduates of West Virginia high schools. These scholarships entitle the recipients 
to the remission of all fees, except those payable to State Special Funds and those 
chargeable to Special Services. Awards will be made by the University Speech De- 
partment at the finals of the West Virginia Interscholastic Forensics Program on a 
date to be announced. Each scholarship shall remain in effect for four academic 
years unless revoked for disciplinary reasons, for failure to maintain scholastic 
standard, or withdrawal from the University. 

Woman's Music Club of Morgantown Scholarship. This scholarship was estab- 
lished in 1950 to be awarded to a talented freshman in the University School of Music. 
Recommendations for the recipient of this scholarship shall be the responsibility of 
the Director and faculty of the School of Music. 

The P. A. and Ethel N. George Pharmacy Scholarship. Established in September, 
1950, by Mr. Charles A. George of Ronceverte, West Virginia, this scholarship of 
$50.00 per semester is available to a student in the College of Pharmacy from either 
Greenbrier or Monroe counties who needs financial assistance to complete his phar- 
maceutical education at West Virginia University. Applications should be made to 
the Dean of the College of Pharmacy and the recipient must maintain at least a "C" 
average to continue on the scholarship. 

Harrison County Alumni Chapter Scholarship. This scholarship, established 
in 1950, provides tuition fees to an outstanding Harrison County high school graduate. 
Selection is made by the Harrison County Alumni Chapter. 

Carleton C. Pierce Scholarships. General Carleton C. Pierce established in June, 
1950, three scholarships to be awarded as follows: $100 to "top man" and $50 to 
"second man" on the West Virginia University football team and S50 to the "top 
man" on the West Virginia Freshman football team, all of which shall be for the 
best academic work, as well as game participation. Recommendations for the 
recipients of these scholarships is the responsibility of the West Virginia University 
Varsity and Freshman coaching staffs. 

The Elizabeth Davis Richards Scholarship in English and Poetry. In memory 
of Elizabeth Davis Richards, well-known West Virginia authoress and patron of 
the English Club, an annual scholarship in the amount of $50 was established by 
Del Roy Richards of Morgantown in December, 1936, to be awarded to some worthy 
upper-division or graduate student in the Department of English. 

The John Barton Payne Scholarship. The Hon. John Barton Payne, native 
of Taylor county and late president of the American Red Cross, bequeathed to 
the University the sum of $12,000, the income from which is to be used to aid 
two young men— one a native of Taylor county, the other a native of Preston 
county— to attend the University. Financial need and scholastic merit are prime 
considerations in making the award. 

The Sears-Roebuck Agricultural Foundation Scholarships. A grant to the 
College of Agriculture of $2200 from the Sears Roebuck Agricultural Foundation 
of Chicago makes possible the awarding of scholarships each year to upwards 
of ten needy, deserving boys enrolling as freshmen and one sophomore in Agri- 
culture. Individual scholarships amount to $200 per year. The selection of the 
recipients of each of the scholarships is made by the Dean and faculty of the 
College of Agriculture. 

The Southern States Cooperative Scholarship. Each year the most outstand- 
ing high-school student in vocational agriculture who is also a member of the 
West Virginia association, Future Farmers of America, and who matriculates in the 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 33 



College of Agriculture will receive a scholarship award of $100 from Southern 
States Cooperative, Inc. 

The Junior League Scholarship. This scholarship, providing $150 a year 
for a graduate Social Work student, was established in 1942: It is jointly sup- 
ported by the five leagues of the state. Applicants must be residents of West 
Virginia, and all applications must be addressed to the head of the Department 
of Social Work. 

The Board of Governors Latin-American Scfiolarships. These two scholarships 
are available to Latin-American students for full-time graduate work in the De- 
partment of Social Work. They are equivalent to annual nonresident tuition 
fees; and recipients are selected by the head of the Department. 

West Virginia Federation of Women's Clubs Pan-American Scholarships. The 
winner of this scholarship is remitted tuition fees by the Board of Governors and 
receives room, board, books, and other incidentals from the federation. 

The West Virginia Federation of Women's Clubs Scholarship. This scholar- 
ship provides $150 a year and is awarded to a full-time student in the Depart- 
ment of Social Work. The recipient, selected by the head of the department, 
must be a resident of West Virginia. 

The Morgantown Service League Scholarship. This scholarship provides $150 
a year for a full-time student in the Department of Social Work. The student 
must be a resident of the state and approved by the head of the department. 

The State Department of Public Assistance Scholarships. These Social Work 
scholarships, ranging from small sums up to $125 a month or more, are available to 
selected employees of the Department who hold an undergraduate degree from an 
accredited college or university. Application for these scholarships must be made 
to the chief of the Division of Social Services or to the chief of the Division of 
Child Welfare of the State Department of Public Assistance, Charleston. Such 
students must also be approved by the head of the Department of Social Work. 

The pharmacists of West Virginia, individually and collectively, have pro- 
vided a number of scholarships in the amount of $150 per year for capable high- 
school graduates needing financial assistance to assist in their pharmaceutical educ- 
ation. The final selections of these scholarships are made by a committee of the 
West Virginia State Pharmaceutical Association. Additional information may be 
obtained from the Dean of the College of Pharmacy. 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education. This foundation, 
in order to stimulate an interest for pharmacy as a profession among capable 
high-school graduates, has assigned several scholarships to the College of Pharmacy. 
Each scholarship or grant covers tuition fees for one year. Selections for the 
awards are made by the faculty of the College and are awarded on the basis of 
scholarship and financial need. The holder mav be eligible for reappointment. 
Additional information may be obtained from the Dean of the College. 

The School of Journalism Scholarships. Six scholarships in Journalism of 
$100 each are awarded annually to pre-journalism freshmen and sophomores and 
to professional juniors and seniors on the basis of ability, scholastic achievement, 
and promise for a successful journalistic career. Scholarship holders are eligible 
for reappointment. These scholarships were established in 1945. Two of them 
are known as the Daily Mail Scholarships and were established by Walter E. Clark 
and Fred M. Stanton of the Charleston Dailv Mail. Two are known as the Lewis 
Baker Scholarships and were established by Mrs. Guy Despard Goff of New York City 
in memory of Lewis Baker, her father, who was a newspaper executive in Wheel- 
ing. The other two are known as the Ogden Scholarships and were established by 
the News Publishing Company of Wheeling in honor of the late H. C. Ogden, 
publisher and alumnus. These scholarships are awarded upon the recommendation 
of the School of Journalism. 

The R. M. Davis Scholarship in Political Science. R. M. Davis, Morgantown, 
West Virginia, coal operator, has given to the University the sum of $5,000 to 
establish a scholarship in the Department of Political Science. The scholarship, 
with an average annual value of between $300 and $500, will be granted to an 
undergraduate or graduate student registered in the Department of Political Science 



34 GENERAL INFORMATION 



whose speciality is international relations. The staff of the Department will select the 
winner. Scholastic standing and qualities of leadership will be given primary con- 
sideration in awarding the scholarship. Any West Virginia University student 
whose major is in Political Science and who is interested in being considered for 
this scholarship should write directly to the head of the Department of Political 
Science. 

The Kroger Company Scholarship. The Kroger Company will give three 
scholarships of $200 each, to be divided between Agriculture (one) and Home 
Economics (two). Awards on the bases of scholarship and leadership in school, 
church, F.F.A., F.H.A., 4-H, and other youth activities will be made by the Scholar- 
ship Committee of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics. 

The Standard Oil Company of New Jersey Scholarship. In 1947 the Standard 
Oil Company of New Jersey provided a four-year scholarship of $100 per year 
to a boy in 4-H work in West Virginia. Selection of recipients is made by a com- 
mittee consisting of the State Director of Extension, the State Club Leader, and 
the Dean of the College of Agriculture. Selection is made on the bases of need, 
merit, and ability. 

The West Virginia Coal Association Scholarships. The sum of $5,000 per year 
for each of five years beginning in 1947 was given by the West Virginia Coal 
Association to establish eight scholarships in coal mining engineering. Each scholar- 
ship is for $625 per annum. Nominations for the scholarships mav be made by the 
West Virginia Coal Association, by any member of that body, by any coal mine 
superintendent, by any high-school principal or teacher, or by any graduating high- 
school senior or recent graduate placing himself in nomination. All nominations 
should be addressed to the Director of the School of Mines, West Virginia Univer- 
sity. 

The Claude Worlhington Benedum Scholarship. This annual scholarship of 
SS50 was established in 1947 by M. L. Benedum of Pittsburgh, Pa., in memory 
of his son who died in military service during World War I. The recipient shall 
be a male graduate of Bridgeport (West Virginia) High School, and the selection 
shall be made bv the Principal of the Bridgeport High School and by the Director 
of Student Affairs at West Virginia University. 

The Central Appalachian Section of the American Institute of Mining and 
Metallurgical Engineers has awarded three scholarships to boys in Kentucky, West 
Virginia, and Virginia. These boys are eligible to attend any school in the area 
giving mining engineering. 

The Lakin Roberts Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship is open to grad- 
uate students in Education and is worth $200 per year. (Inoperative during the 
current academic year.) 

The KDKA Agricultural Scholarship. To recognize outstanding leadership, 
to encourage use of radio in disseminating agricultural information, and to help 
train students in broadcast techniques, Station KDKA, Pittsburgh, Pa., has estab- 
lished this scholarship amounting to $100, for one junior or senior agricultural 
student to be chosen each year bv the Scholarship Committee of the College of 
Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics. 

The Kelley's Creek Colliery Company Scholarship. This scholarship was 
established in 1948 by the Kelley's Creek Colliery Company. The winner is deter- 
mined by competitive examination conducted bv the University and continues on 
the scholarship for four years if a satisfactory average is maintained. The scholar- 
ship is valued at $160 per year. 

The Red Jacket Coal Corporation Scholarships. In 1948 the Red Jacket Coal 
Corporation created two undergraduate scholarships in the School of Mines, carry- 
ing an annual value of $600 each. Winners are selected by competitive examin- 
ation conducted by the School of Mines. 

The Palace Furniture Company Scholarsliip. Established in 1946 by the Palace 
Furniture Company and Radio Station WBLK of Clarksburg, this four-year scholar- 
ship is valued at $320 and is awarded to the final winner of the radio-quiz pro- 
gram, Palace Kollege of History Knowledge, which is open only to Harrison County 
high-school students. 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 35 



The West Virginia Moose Association Scholarship. This scholarship was 
established in 1946 by the West Virginia Moose Association. It pays for the tuition, 
books, room, and board lor four years in any undergraduate college on this 
campus that the high-ranking male student of Mooseheart, Illinois, may elect. 

Science Talent Search Scholarship. The University Board of Governors and 
the West Virginia Academy of Science established the Science Talent Search Scholar- 
snip beginning with the school year 1949-50. The scholarship entitles the recipient 
to remission of all fees, except those payable to State Special Funds and those 
chargeable to Special Services. The recipient is selected by and under the rules 
of the West Virginia Academy of Science which awards in cash an amount not 
less than the total of the fees remitted by West Virginia University. 

Richard Aspinall Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 1944 by 
the Morgantown Moose Lodge No. 264. It pays for tuition, books, and room and 
board for four years in any undergraduate college on this campus that the high- 
ranking graduate of Mooseheart, Illinois, may elect. 

Rachel Colwell Scholarship. This scholarship was established and is supported 
by Phi Upsilon Omicorn, professional home economics organization. Alumni and 
active chapters cooperate in providing a tuition scholarship to an entering fresh- 
man who proposes to major in Home Economics at West Virginia University. 
Selection is based upon the candidate's high-school record, including experiences 
in such organizations as 4-H and F.H.A. Blanks upon which applications may be 
made are available through the Division of Home Economics, West Virginia Uni- 
versity. 

Kanaivha Valley Mining Institute Scholarships. Two scholarships, valued at 
$600 per year, were established by the Kanawha Valley Mining Institute, Inc., of 
Montgomery, West Virginia, in 1948 and 1949, respectively. Selection is made by 
the Kanawha Valley Mining Institute with the approval of the School of Mines of West 
Virginia University. 

McDowell Club Scholarship. One scholarship valued at $100 is awarded an- 
nuallv by the campus student organization known as the McDowell Club. Selec- 
tion is made by competitive examination under the direction of the County Super- 
intendent of Schools. 

Sophia and Clora Benedum Scholarship Fund. The will of the late Clora 
Benedum of Bridgeport, West Virginia, who passed away in January, 1949, estab- 
lished a SI 0,000 trust fund to be known as the Sophia and Clora Benedum Scholar- 
ship Fund. The provision of the will concerning the fund states that "income is 
to be used in assisting graduates of Bridgeport High School in attending West 
\ irginia University." The scholarships are administered by the University Com- 
mittee on Prizes, Scholarships, and Loan Funds. 

The Charleston Press Club Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 1951 
by the Press Club of Charleston, West Virginia. It has a value of $200 per year, 
but may be awarded only in the amount of $100 each semester. Recipient must be 
a sophomore, a junior, or a senior in the School of Journalism and must be a resident 
of West Virginia. Ability, scholastic standing, promise for a journalistic career, and 
linancial need are considered chiefly in making awards. 

Jackson-Perks Post No. 71 Scholarship. Established in 1951 by The American 
Legion, Charles Town, West Virginia, this four-year scholarship is valued at $500. 

Jane Addams Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 1951 
by an anonymous donor residing somewhere in West Virginia in memory of Jane 
Addams for a worthy student in the field of Home Economics. The scholarship 
provides a cash grant of $150. 

Leyenberger Scholarship. This annual scholarship of $1,000 was established in 
1951 by an anonymous donor of Wheeling, West Virginia. This scholarship is avail- 
able from time to time to a worthy student enrolled in the University and who is 
selected by the University Scholarship Committee. 

Logan Woman's Council Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 1951 
by the Logan Woman's Council of Logan, West Virginia. It has a value of $1,000 
per year, but may be awarded only in the amount of $500 each semester. This 
scholarship is available from time to time to a worthy student enrolled in the Uni- 
versity. Selection is made by the University Scholarship Committee. 



3G GENERAL INFORMATION 



West Virginia Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarship. 
This scholarship was established in 1950 bv the West Virginia Division of the United 
Daughters of the Confederacy. It has a value of S100 per year. Selection is made by 
the United Daughters of the Confederacy. 

Women of the Moose Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 1951 by 
the Women of the Moose. This four-year scholarship is valued at $5,000 and is 
awarded to a high-ranking graduate of Mooseheart, Illinois. 

The West Virginia Farm Women's Council Scholarship (Foreign). This scholar- 
ship, established in 1949 for the purpose of promoting better understanding be- 
tween rural people of this country and rural people of foreign countries, provides 
for books, board, room, and other necessary living expenses of a foreign student 
enrolled in the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Home Economics, with a major 
in Home Economics. 

The West Virginia Farm Women's Council Scholarship (State). This scholar- 
ship of S100 is available to a freshman girl enrolled in the Division of Home 
Economics. Selection will be made bv a committee composed of a representative 
from each of the following groups: Farm Women's Council, Division of Home 
Economics, and Agricultural Extension Service. 

The Patrick Duffy Koontz Scholarships. The late Patrick Duffy Koontz, Esq., and 
Arthur Burke Koontz, Esq., have donated to the University certain securities, the 
income from which is to be used for the purpose of establishing scholarships in 
the College of Law for worthy students from West Virginia. The value of each 
scholraship award is S250. The first of these awards will be made during the 
academic year 1949-50. These scholarships are to be awarded to such second- or 
third- year students as, in the judgment of a committee of the faculty of the 
College of Law appointed by the President, shall have shown outstanding promise 
with respect to the following qualities: (1) scholastic ability and attainments; (2) 
moral force of character and leadership. 

The Guy Farmer Scholarship. Guy Farmer, Esq., has made a donation to the 
University for the purpose of establishing scholarship awards to such members of 
the Student Board of Editors of the West Virginia Law Review as, in the judgment 
of the faculty of the College of Law, shall have made outstanding contributions to 
the Law Review. The value of each of the awards is $50. No more than one award 
will be made in any one year. 

The Presser Foundation Scholarship in Music. The Presser Foundation of Phila- 
delphia, Pa., in November, 1952, established a scholarship in the University for the 
aid of a student in the School of Music. The annual value of the scholarship is S250. 
and selection of the recipient is made bv the Director of the School of Music. Only 
students of good character and satisfactory standing, who could not carry on their 
studies without financial help provided by the Foundation, may receive this scholar- 
ship. Preference is given to those who expect to become teachers. Inquiries on appli- 
cation details should go to the Director of the School of Music. 

The Charles B. Jolliffe Scholarship. The Radio Corporation of America in May, 
1952, established the Charles B. Jolliffe Scholarship in honor of Dr. Charles B. Jolliffe, 
a distinguished graduate of the University and present Vice-president and Technical 
Director of the Radio Corporation of America. The scholarship is valued at 3800. 
per year, and is awarded to an outstanding undergraduate students in the University 
who has elected to major in Chemistry, Mathematics, or Physics. Application details 
may be secured from the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

The Education Foundation of West Virginia, Inc. Scholarships. In March, 1952, 
the Education Foundation of West Virginia, Inc., established two scholarships in the 
University for the aid of graduate students who are working toward doctoral degrees 
and whose dissertations will be written on some West Virginia subject. Need for 
financial assistance is a condition of scholarship awards. Each grant is for $500. 
Application details are available from the Dean of the Graduate School. 

The Semet-Solvay Scholarship. The Semet-Solvay Division, Allied Chemical and 
Dye Corporation of Bluefield, W. Va., in March, 1952, established the Semet-Solvay 
Scholarship in Mining Engineering. This scholarship is awarded to an outstanding 
high school graduate who is a resident of West Virginia and who will pursue a course 
in coal mining engineering and will accept employment in the coal mining industry 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 



upon graduation. The scholarship pays $600. per year, and is renewable from year 
to year on the basis of satisfactory academic work during the previous year. Applica- 
tion inquiries should be sent to the Director of the School of Mines. 

The West Virginia University All-Campus Foreign Student Scholarship. In January, 

1951, the All-Campus Foreign Student Committee, representing several campus or- 
ganizations, established a one-year scholarship for the support of a foreign student 
in the Universitv. Board, room, and incidental expenses are paid annually by the 
Student Committee, with a remission of tuition and fees being provided by the 
University. 

The Woman's Music Club of Morgantown Scholarship. In the fall of 1950 the 
Woman's Music Club of Morgantown established an annual scholarship of $154. for 
the aid of a "talented freshman" in the School of Music. Selection is made by the 
Director and faculty of the School of Music. 

The National Society of Colonial Dames of America Scholarship. The National 
Society of Colonial Dames of America, Resident in the State of West Virginia, in March, 

1952, established an annual scholarship for the aid of a worthy graduate student for 
work in the field of Early American History. The annual value of the scholarship is 
$150. and selection is made by the Head and the staff of the department of History. 

The West Virginia Association of Small Loan Companies Scholarship. The West 
Virginia Association of Small Loan Companies in 1946 established an annual scholar- 
ship of $150. for the aid of an outstanding and needy student in the University who 
is a resident of West Virginia. In 1952 the Association made specific designation of 
this scholarship for use by an outstanding student enrolled in the new College of 
Commerce. Selection is based on character, academic achievement, and general 
campus activities. 

The Frank Bliss Ensloiv Legal Scholarship. The late Mrs. Frank Bliss Enslow of 
Huntington, W.V., provided in her will a trust fund in support of the Frank Bliss 
Enslow Legal Scholarship in West Virginia University. This annual scholarship award is 
restricted to students enrolled in the College of Law, and selection is made on the 
basis of ability, character, financial status, and scholastic qualifications. Recipients 
must be residents of West Virginia and preference will be given applicants from Cabell 
County, West Virginia. The amount of the scholarship award will be determined 
from year to year. 

Fellowships 

Bituminous Coal Research, Inc., Fellowship. A fund of $10,000 per year for a 
fellow and an assistant, and also for current expense and overhead, to study causes 
of acid formation in mine-drainage waters and to supply means of reducing, elimin- 
ating, or utilizing such acidity. 

International Nickel Company Felloxoship. A fund of $1200 per year for a 
fellow, plus $480 a year for supplies and overhead, for studies of heat transfer 
through metal walls. 

The Edward Orton, Jr. Ceramic Foundation Fellozrship. In October, 1950, the 
Edward Orton, Jr. Ceramic Foundation of Columbus. Ohio, established a fellowship 
of $1200 for research fundamental in character and primarily applicable to those 
branches of the ceramic industry making kiln fired wares. Candidates for this 
fellowship must have completed either a recognized course in ceramic engineering or 
technology or shall have acquired basic fundamental ceramic knowledge following 
the completion of a recognized course in engineering or the sciences. Applications 
should be submitted to the Director of the Engineering Experiment Station. 

The Weirton Steel Company Fellowship. The Weirton Steel Company in Novem- 
ber, 1952, established the Weirton Steel Company Fellowship in the University for 
the purpose of training a student in research methods as well as developing him in a 
graduate program. The value of the fellowship is $2300. and the program is under 
the direction of the Engineering Experiment Station. Application details may be 
secured from the Director of the Station. 



38 GENERAL INFORMATION 



Loan Funds 

The following loan funds are administered through the office of the Director 
of Student Affairs, with the cooperation of advisory committees, University officials, 
and alumni. Applications may be filed with Joseph C. Gluck, 205 Administration 
Building. 

The John B. Finley Fund. A fund of $1,000 was contributed to the University 
by the trustees of the estate of the Hon. John B. Finley of Pittsburgh, Pa., in 
accordance with his last will and testament, to be used as loans to deserving stu- 
dents in the School of Medicine. 

The Theodore Smitli Fund. On April 13, 1930, Theodore Smith was drowned 
in the Monongahela River. His tragic death disclosed the fact that he was being 
financed through the University by the late Hon. James Elwood Jones. He had 
taken out a life insurance policy of $2,000 with Mr. Jones as beneficiary. In 
deference to the memory of Theodore Smith, Mr. Jones turned the $2,000 over to 
the University for the establishment of the Theodore Smith Fund. 

The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Fund. A special fund for small loans to 
students in the College of Agriculture has been established by the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad. 

The Chauncey Watson Boucher Fund. This fund was established in 193G 
by former President C. S. Boucher in memory of his father. Seniors from West 
Virginia may borrow onlv for the payment of University fees. Loans must be re- 
paid within two vears and are without interest. 

The Charles E. Lawall Fund. Established in 1939 for small loans to worthy 
students; available to students whose schloastic record has been satisfactory; interest 
payable only for periods in excess of time for which the loan is granted. 

Alfred Walker Fund. This is a special fund for loans to Pharmacy students, 
established in 1938 by Dean J. Lester Hayman in honor of the memory of Alfred 
Walker of Sutton, first president of the West Virginia Pharmaceutical Association 
and, for many years, secretary of the State Pharmaceutical Association. 

The John W. Davis Fund, established for the making of loans to outstanding 
law students, aids worthy students each year. 

The P. C. Thomas Fund. In May 1943 the P. C. Thomas loan fund was 
established in memory of the late P. C. Thomas of the Koppers Coal Company. 
The initial contribution made by the employees of the Company was $520. 

The Kellogg Foundation Fund. The Kellogg Foundation in 1942 allotted $5,000 
to West Virginia University for loans to students of medicine. Loans may not 
exceed $150 during any academic year. The total loan to one student may not 
exceed $250. Interest is charged at the rate of 2 per cent. Students may not 
borrow until after the successful completion of one term in the School of Medicine. 
The Leon Leonian Memorial Fund. Established in July 1945 in honor of the 
memory of Dr. Leon H. Leonian. Small loans are made to students for a short 
period without interest. 

The Loyalty Permanent Endowment Loan Fund of the W.V.U. Alumni Asso- 
ciation. This fund was established some many years ago by contributions of 
alumni and other friends of the University. It is a permanent trust fund, the 
income of which is available to worthy students. 

West Virginia State Conference of Social Work Fund. In 1940 the State Con- 
ference of Social Work established a student loan fund for the department of 
Social Work, such fund to be granted, without interest, to eligible full-time grad- 
uate Social Work students who are residents of West Virginia. 

Howard T. Phillips Loan Fund. The late Dr. Howard T. Phillips of Wheeling 
set aside in his will a grant of approximately $1,000 for loans to medical stu- 
dents at West Virginia University. The fund was set in motion in the fall of 
1949. Dr. Phillips stipulated that loans from this fund should be made to "stu- 
dents who are deserving as well as needy and who are enrolled in the Medical 
School." 

Fred G. and Nannie D. Wood Loan Fund. In November, 1949, the Fred G. 
and Nannie D. Wood Loan Fund was created by an initial gift of $1,000 from 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 39 



Fred G. Wood, retired Raleigh County coal operator now living at Daytona Beach, 
Florida. The fund provisions state loans shall be made to assist students to re- 
ceive training in the engineering of coal mines, and that "preference shall be given 
to students from families engaged in coal mining, or who have grown up in coal 
mining communities." 

The Revolving Emergency Loan Fund. A fund to meet emergencies of Univer- 
sity students was established in October, 1931. The principal of this fund amounts 
to about S3. 000. H. E. Stone was founder of the fund. Loans are made in small 
amounts and for short periods of time. 

Service Clubs Loan Fund of West Virginia University, Inc. In 1950 the West 
Virginia Kiwanis District established a non-restricted loan fund for needy University 
students. This loan fund is administered through the Office of the Director of 
Student Affairs. Any student who is in good standing in the University and is in 
need of some financial help may receive a loan. The fund is operated on a non- 
profit basis and the low rate of interest charged is to go toward the building up of 
the total amount that will be available for the student loans. 

Social Work Alumni Loan Fund. This fund, totaling S100 at present, was estab- 
lished in 1951 for the benefit of undergraduate or graduate students in the Depart- 
ment of Social Work, irrespective of residence. Loans are made by the Director of 
Student Affairs with the approval of the Head of the Department of Social Work. 
No interest is required, and loans are to be repaid within two years after the student 
has completed his current degree objective. 

John M. Crawford and David B. Crawford Loan Fund. In November, 1951, the 
Parkersburg Rig and Reel Company, Parkersburg, West Virginia, established the 
John M. Crawford and David B. Crawford Loan Fund with an initial gift of S5.000. 
The purpose of this fund is to assist accredited students who are seeking a degree 
in engineering or geology and who have financial need. Loans are available to 
students who are graduates of West Virginia high schools, and seeking a degree in 
engineering, preferably petroleum engineering or geology. 

Lily Bell Sefton Deatrick Student Loan Fund. Established in 1947 by the 
Campus Club in memory of Lilly Bell Sefton Deatrick. Small loans are made to stu- 
dents without interest until after graduation. The fund is administered by the 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the head of the Department of 
Chemistry. 

P. /. Reed— Journalism Alumni Loan Fund. This fund was started in 1949 by 
members of the Journalism Class of 1940 to provide small emergency loans to 
University students majoring in Journalism. The fund was raised through cont- 
ributions of Journalism alumni of various classes. Loans should be repaid in 
one to three months. The fund honors Dr. P. I. Reed, Director of the School of 
Journalism since it was formed in 1939, and former head of the Department of 
Journalism. 

Elizabeth McAllister Crawford and John McLenaghan Crawford Fund. In Octo- 
ber, 1950, the Consolidated Natural Gas System Educational Foundation established 
the Elizabeth McAllister Crawford and John McLenaghan Crawford Loan Fund with 
an initial gift of $10,000. The purpose of this fund is to assist students who are 
without other resources from which their educational needs may be met. To be 
eligible for this aid, a student must be a graduate of a West Virginia high school, 
enrolled in a course leading to a degree, and must have completed at least the first 
semester of the freshman year. 

Maud George Memorial Fund. In September, 1950, Mr. Charles A. George of 
Ronceverte, West Virginia, in memory of his aunt, established the Maud George 
memorial Loan Fund, in the amount of $50 per semester or $100 per academic year, 
during his lifetime, for a man or woman student from either Greenbrier or Monroe 
counties, West Virginia, who is enrolled in Agriculture, Home Economics, or the 
Forestry Division. Application should be made to the Dean of the College of 
Agriculture. 

The Senior Class Loan Fund. A gift of SI 00 was given by the 1949 Senior 
Class to be used for aid to seniors in the University needing financial assistance. The 
Senior Class of 1950 supplemented this fund with their gift of an additional $100. 
Small loans are made without interest. 



40 GENERAL INFORMATION 



The Central West Virginia Coal Mining Institute Scholarship Loan Fund. In 
\pril. 1952, the Central Wesl Virginia Coal Mining Institute established a scholarship 
loan fund of 56,000 for the purpose of aiding young men in the study of coal mining 
engineering in the School of Mines at "West Virginia University. A subsequent alloca- 
tion in February, 1953. raised the total to 510.000. The fund is restricted to residents 
of the six counties covered by the Central West Virginia Coal Mining Institute 
(Harrison, Taylor, Barbour, Upshur, Randolph, and Tucker), or to persons residing 
outside that area whose principal family employment is within the area. It is further 
required that the father or guardian of the applicant be a regular employee in the 
coal mining industry within the six counties named. Scholarship loans of S500 per 
year will be made to recipients for a maximum of four years, with repayments to the 
fund being made after graduation. All inquiries about this fund should be sent to 
the Director of the School of Mines. 

The Monongahela Valley Coal Mining Institute Loan Fund. In December, 1952, 
the Monongahela Valley Coal Mining Institute established a loan fund of 51,000 in 
West Virginia University to aid worthy students in the field of coal mining engineering 
who are residents of Monongalia County, "West Virginia. Loans may be made to 
students beyond their first semester in Mining Engineering on a short-time basis 
without interest. 

Robert H. Pritchard Journalism Loan Fund. In September, 1952, Dr. and Mrs. 
Frank V. Rueckl of Winnemucca, Ne\ada, established a loan fund in the University in 
memory of Mrs. Rueckl's father, Robert H. Pritchard, a former member of the Uni- 
versity Board of Governors and prominent newspaper owner and editor in Weston, 
W. Ya. This fund of 51.000 is open to use by Journalism students who are residents 
of West Virginia. Loans up to 5100 per year may be obtained by a student over foui 
years. 

PRIZES, TROPHIES, AND MEDALS 
Prizes 

Awards for prizes in the University are made in accordance with the follow- 
ing rules: 

No composition, in whole or in part, shall be submitted in competition for 
two prizes. 

Only students pursuing courses leading to baccalaureate degrees are eligible 
for any prize offered, except for the James F. Brown prize. 

No student shall be eligible to enter any contest w 7 ho has not been a resi- 
dent student in this University for at least one semester preceding the semester 
in which the contest is to be held, and who, unless he be a competitor for the 
James F. Brown prize, is not a resident student in good standing in the University 
in the semester in which the contest is held. 

No successful contestant may become for a second time a competitor for the 
same prize. 

If in any contest the judges find no manuscript of sufficient merit, there shall 
be no award for the prize that year. 

Students intending to compete in anv essay-writing contest must notify the 
chairman of the Committee on Prizes not later than March 15, Three typewritten 
copies of each essay must be in the hands of the chairman of the committee not 
later than May 15. 

The conditions upon which the awards m the several contests are made may 
be learned upon application to the office of the Director of Student Affairs. 

The Tax Commission Prize. The honorable members of the State Tax Com- 
mission of 1902, namely W. P. Hubbard, Henry G. Davis, John K. Thompson, 
L. J. Williams, and J. H. Holt, gave the sum of SI, 350, later increased by unawarded 
sums to SI, 500. the income of which is to be used annually as a prize for the "best 
original work bearing on matters of taxation in West Virginia." The conditions 
of the competition are determined by the Council of Administration. The amount 
of the prize at prseent is S50. 

The James F. Brown Prize. The Hon. James F. Brown, an alumnus of the 
University, "with a desire to stimulate the young men of the State to fuller con 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 41 



sideration of the 'inalienable right' of mankind, and especially those guaranteed 
by the Constitution of the State and the United States," has contributed $5,000 to 
the University, the income of which is to be "used as a prize for the best essay 
or paper each vear on the subject of the individual liberties of the citizen as 
guaranteed by the Constitution." The income may be given as a single prize, or 
it may be divided into a first and second prize. For the present the award will 
oe made as a single prize, S200 in amount. Any regularly enrolled student in any 
school or college of the University or any student within one year after receiving 
an undergraduate degree may compete for this prize. Graduates of the College of 
Law or the School of Medicine or holders of any post-graduate degree are not 
eligible to compete for this prize. 

The West Virginia State Pharmaceutical Association Prize. The West Virginia 
State Pharmaceutical Association offers to the student making the best set of 
drawings in Pharmacy 10 a two-year, paid-up membership in the American Pharm- 
aceutical Association. 

The Waitman Barbe Memorial Prize. The English Club of West Virginia 
University offers an annual prize of $25 in memory of Waitman Barbe, poet, 
scholar, and adviser of the English Club during his long term of service on the 
faculty. The prize is awarded to some student regularly enrolled as a junior or 
senior in West Virginia University, for creative work in the field of literature, either 
in prose or poetry or both. The minimum length of such compositions must be 
four thousand words in prose or one hundred lines in poetry. 

The Board of Governors Military Essay Prize. The Board of Governors of 
West Virginia University each year offers a prize of $50 to the cadet in the 
Division of Military and Air Science and Tactics "who shall write the best essay 
on preparation against war." 

Chi Omega Sorority Prize. The Chi Omega sororitv offers an annual $15 
prize to the Sociology major with the highest academic ranking. All work done 
at West Virginia is taken into account and no student is eligible to compete lor 
the prize unless his junior and senior years have been spent at West Virginia Univ- 
ersity. The prize is awarded at the annual Commencement. 

Phi Lambda Upsilon Fraternity Prize. Phi Lambda Upsilon, honorary chem- 
ical fraternity, offers annually the Alexander Reed Whitehill award to the student 
receiving the highest grade in chemistry during the freshman year. The award 
consists of an engraved ornament. 

Tau Beta Pi, honorarv Engineering fraternity, each vear offers an engraved 
cup to the sophomore engineer who during his freshman year maintanied the 
highest average in his class. 

The Rufus A. West Award for Engineering Students. The late Rufus A West, 
a former instructor of the University, because of his interest in the College of Engi- 
neering and in the young men who have been and are students there and with the 
further idea of promoting sound scholarship, bequeathed SI 0,000, the income of 
which is to be used as an award to the member of the graduating class of the College 
of Engineering in June who has maintained the highest scholarship as measured 
by his grade-point average. The first date for the presentation of this award will be 
June, 1953. 

The La Verne B. Davis Home Economics Award. This award ($25.00) was estab- 
lished and is supported by Mr. and Mrs. Richard Earle Davis. The award is pre- 
sented annually at Commencement time to the graduating senior in the Division of 
Home Economics who has maintained the highest scholastic average during four 
years of residence. 

The Natha?i Burkan Memorial Prize. The American Society of Composers, 
Authors, and Publishers has established the Nathan Burkan Memorial Competition, 
open to the leading universities and colleges of the country that offer a course in 
law. A prize of $100 is available in each institution, to be awarded to the stu- 
dent in the graduating class in Law who prepares the best paper on the subject 
of "Copyright Law." 

The Intercollegiate Peace Association of America provides SI 00 in cash prizes 
to be awarded as follows: $50 for first prize; $30 for second prize; and $20 for 



42 GENERAL INFORMATION 



third prize in the annual Intercollegiate Peace Oratorical Contest. This contest is held 
under the auspices of the Department of Speech of the University and each in- 
stitution of higher learning in the state is entitled to send one representative. 

The Sigma Xi Award. Sigma Xi, the national honary scientific research 
society, annually gives an award to the senior student majoring in science who 
shows most promise in research. The award consists of election to associate mem 
bership in Sigma Xi, with the initiation fee and Associate's key donated by the 
West Virginia Chapter. 

West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association Prize for Students in the School 
of Mines. In order to stimulate interest on the part of oil and natural gas engineer- 
ing students in their profession, the West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association 
offers a prize of $25 each year to a member of the graduating class of the School 
of Mines. The student must be enrolled in the oil and natural gas option, and 
his scholarship must be the highest of that group as measured by his grade-point 
average. 

West Virginia Coal Mining Institute Prize for Students in the School of Mines. 
In order to stimulate interest on the part of mining engineering students in their 
profession, the West Virginia Coal Mining Institute offers a prize of $25 each year 
to the members of the graduating class of the School of Mines. The student must 
be enrolled in the coal mining option, and his scholarship must be the highest 
of that group as measured by his grade-point average. 

The Charles E. Lawall Award. This award was created in 1952 through the 
generosity of D. L. McElroy of Pittsburgh, Pa., and will be given in the first semester 
of each school year to the senior student maintaining the best scholastic average in 
the first one hundred hours of the required curriculum. Students in the coal mining 
option and the oil and gas option are eligible. This award carries a cash payment 
of $50.00. 

The James Wimer Memorial Award. This award pays tuition for one year. The 
donor desired anonymity. The award is given to the senior making the highest 
average in his first three years in Chemical Engineering. 

The Merck Award. Merck and Company, Inc., manufacturing chemists of Rah way, 
N. J., offers an award consisting of the current edition of The Merck Index, the 
Merck Manual of Therapeutics and Materia Medica, and Reagent Chemicals and 
Standards to the graduating senior who attains the highest grade in Pharmacy 113. 

Trophies 

Alpha Epsilon Delta Prize. The Alpha of West Virginia chapter of Alpha 
Epsilon Delta offers each year a silver cup to the freshman premedical student 
who has made the best scholastic record for the year in chemistry and zoology. 

The Louis D. Corson Interfraternity Scholarship Trophy. This trophy is 
awarded at the end of the University year to the fraternity having the highest 
average scholarship standing for that year and is to remain in possession of that 
fraternity during the following year. The cup becomes permanent property of the 
fraternity that wins it three times. 

The School of Physical Education and Athletics offers two trophies to the 
fraternities scoring the highest and second-highest number of points in the all- 
Near athletic competition for fraternities. 

Pan-Hellenic Association Scholarship Cups. The Pan-Hellenic Association offers 
two scholarship cups. Any sorority which is a member of the Women's Pan-Hellenic 
Council may compete for the cup, and it is awarded each year to the group having 
the highest average. The women's fraternity which has maintained the highest 
average for three consecutive years is given permanent possession of the cup. The 
Pan-Hellenic Association also offers a cup each year to the pledge group which 
maintains the highest average. 

Rho Chi Awards. In order to stimulate superior scholastic ability among 
students in the College of Pharmacy, Alpha Mu Chapter of Rho Chi, honorary 
society, offers the following awards: 

An appropriately engraved trophy to the student attaining the highest scho- 
lastic record the first year of enrollment in the College. 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 43 



The current edition of the United States Dispensatory to the student attain- 
ing the highest scholastic record during the sophomore year. 

Medals 

The Lehn and Fink Medal. Through the generosity of Lehn and Fink, manu- 
facturing chemists of New York City, the College of Pharmacy awards a gold medal 
each year to the senior Pharmacy student who ,in the opinion of the faculty of 
the College of Pharmary, attains the highest scholarship. The medal is appropriately 
engraved. 

Prizes in Public Speaking. In each of the four events (debate, oration, 
extempore speaking, and poetry reading) in the West Virginia Interscholastic 
Public Speaking Contest a gold medal is awarded to the winner of first place; a 
silver medal to the winner ot second place; and a bronze medal to all other 
speakers who participate in the semi-finals at the University. Each high school 
represented bv a winner of first place is presented with a beautiful wall plaque 
with the escutcheon of the University mounted upon it. 

The Alpha Kappa Psi Scholarship Key Award. Beta Rho Chapter of Alpha Kappa 
Psi, a professional fraternity of commerce, awards annually the Alpha Kappa Psi 
Scholarship Key to the male senior in the Department of Economics and Rusiness 
Administration, who has attained the highest scholastic average for a minimum of 
six semesters of collegiate work in this University. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Alpha Epsilon Delta (Premedical). The Alpha of West Virginia chapter of Alpha 
Epsilon Delta was established at West Virginia University in 1930. The chief object 
of the society is promotion of high scholarship among premedical students. Juniors 
and seniors of high scholarship and character are eligible for membership. 

Alpha Psi Omega (Dramatics) . Pi chapter of Alpha Psi Omega was formed at 
West Virginia University in 1926. Recognition is given as a reward to students dis- 
tinguishing themselves in dramatic productions, both by playing roles and by per- 
forming other outstanding duties on the technical and business side of productions. 

Alpha Zeta (Agriculture). The West Virginia chapter of Alpha Zeta, the national 
agricultural honor fraternitv, was instituted in the College of Agriculture in 1921. 
Sophomores and upperclassmen who maintain high standing in scholarship and rank 
among the upper two-fifths of their respective classes are eligible to membership. 

Chi Epsilon (Civil Eng'g) . Chi Epsilon, the recognition society in the field of 
civil engineering fosters the development and exercise of fundamentally sound traits 
of character and technical abilitv among engineers which will work towards a higher 
standard of service offered to humanity by the profession. The West Virginia chap- 
ter was formed in 1949. Membership is open to outstanding members of the junior 
and senior classes. 

Delta Nu Tau (Pre-Law) . 

Epsilson Lambda Sigma (Accounting). This is a local honorary society for out- 
standing students in Accounting with high scholastic averages. The purpose of 
Epsilon Lambda Sigma is to promote the moral, intellectual, and social developments 
of its members; to encourage individual research; and to foster interest in the field 
of accounting at West Virginia University. 

Eta Kappa Nu (Elec. Eng'g) . Eta Kappa Nu, an Electrical Engineering honor- 
ary society installed at West Virginia University in 1946, is open to students in the 
upper fourth of the junior class and in the upper third of the senior class. 

Kappa Delta Pi (Education). Kappa Delta Pi, national honorary educational 
society installed Alpha Upsilon chapter at West Virginia University on July 21, 1927 
Election to this fraternity is conditional upon high scholarship and desirable personal 
and professional qualities. 

Kappa Tau Alpha (Journalism). This is a national journalistic honor society 
with special emphasis on high scholarship and the best professional ideals. There 
are chapters in twenty-two universities. The West Virginia chapter was established 
in 1930. 



44 GENERAL INFORMATION 



Mortar Board (Student Leadership— Women) . Laurel Chapter of Mortar Board, 
national women's honorary, was instituted at West Virginia University in 1924. The 
purpose of Mortar Board is: "to provide for the cooperation between the senior honor 
societies for women, to promote college loyalty, to advance the spirit of scholarship, to 
recognize and encourage leadership, and to stimulate and develop a fiiner type of 
college women." Qualifications for membership are service, scholarship and leader- 
ship. New members are elected to Mortar Board in the spring from women who will 
have completed their junior year by the opening of the fall term. Elections are by 
unanimous vote of active members. A scholarship standard must be met by each 
candidate. 

Omicron Nu (Home Economics) . On October 16, 1951, Omicron Nu, national 
honor society in Home Economics, was established at West Virginia University. The 
society has as its purposes "the promotion of scholarship, leadership and research, 
and the advancement of home economics throughout the world." Membership in 
Omicron Nu is based upon high scholarship and promise of future achievement. 
Only persons from the highest 20 per cent of the class are eligible for membership. 
Election is not permitted earlier than the fifth semester of the college course. 

Order of the Coif (Law) . A chapter of the Order of the Coif, national law 
school honor society, was installed in 1925. Its members are selected by the law 
faculty from 10 per cent of the senior class in the College of Law ranking highest 
in scholarship. 

Phi Beta Kappa (Scholarship) . The Alpha of West Virginia chapter of the Phi 
Beta Kappa Society is established at the University. Stated meetings or public exer- 
cises of the society are held twice annually; the anniversary meeting on December 5, 
and the annual meeting during Commencement Week. The honor of membership 
may be conferred upon candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, the Degree of 
Bachelor of Science (if they also meet the requirements for the former) , or for the 
Degree of Doctor of Philosophy who have maintained a high scholarship rank during 
their college courses; also, upon outstanding alumni of the University, and persons 
attaining national or international reputations in letters, science, or education. 

Phi Epsilon Phi (Botany). Phi Epsilon Phi, botanical honor fraternity, was 
founded at West Virginia University in 1929. The fraternity has for its purpose 
promotion of high scholarship, inciting of interest in botanical research, and en- 
couragement of professional ideals. Seniors and graduate students who are engaged 
in botanical work and who have attained a high standard of scholarship and char- 
acter are eligible for membership. 

Phi Lambda Upsilon (Chemistry) . The Tau chapter of Phi Lambda Upsilon, 
national chemical honor fraternity, was established at the University in 1924. The 
chief object of the society is promotion and protection of high scholarship and 
original investigation of all branches of pure and applied chemistry. Seniors and 
juniors who have attained a high standard of scholarship and character are eligible. 

Pi Delta Phi (French). 

Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Eng'g). The West Virginia Pi Gamma chapter of Pi 
Tau Sigma was installed at West Virginia University on March 31, 1942. This is 
an honorary mechanical engineering fraternity with chapters in thirty-five univer- 
sities. Seniors and juniors in Mechanical Engineering who have attained high 
scholarship rank are eligible for membership. 

Psi Chi (Psychology) . West Virginia chapter of Psi Chi, national recognition 
society in the field of psychology, was formed November 15, 1948. Membership is 
open to psychology majors and minors who have a high scholastic average. The pur- 
pose of the society is primarily to advance the science of psychology and is further 
concerned with stimulating scholarship of the individual members in all academic 
fields. 

Rho Chi (Pharmaceutical). Rho Chi, National Honorary Pharmaceutical So- 
ciety, installed Alpha Mu chapter at West Virginia University, January 28, 1949. The 
object of the Society is "the promotion of scholarship and friendship and recognition 
of high attainments in the pharmaceutical sciences." A student elected to member- 
ship must have completed 75 hours of scholastic work, attained a scholastic average 
of "B" or better, shown capacity for achievement in the science and art of pharmacy 
and the allied sciences as evidenced by strength of character, personality, and leader- 
ship; and be approved by the Dean of the College of Pharmacy. 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 45 



Scabbard & Blade (Military) . C Company, Second Regiment, West Virginia Uni- 
versity, the National Society of Scabbard and Blade, was installed on May 21, 1916. 
The society believes that military service is an obligation of citizenship and that the 
greater opportunities afforded college men for the study of military science place 
upon them certain responsibilities as citizens. The purpose is to create and unite 
in closer relationship the military departments of American universities and colleges; 
to preserve and develop the essential qualities of good, efficient officers; to prepare 
themselves as educated men to take a more active part and to have a greater in- 
fluence in military affairs of the communities in which they may reside; and above 
all to spread intelligent information concerning military requirements of our coun- 
try. Advanced Course R.O.T.C. and A.R.O.T.C. students who maintain high stand- 
ing in scholarship, leadership, character, and efficiency are eligible for membership. 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon (Earth Sciences) . Upsilon chapter was established at 
West Virginia University in 1927. The fraternity has for its objects the social, scho- 
lastic, and scientific advancement of its members; extension of the relations of friend- 
ship and assistance between the universities and scientific schools with recognized 
standing in the United States and Canada; and upbuilding of a national college 
society devoted to advancement of geology, mining, metallurgy, and ceramics. Sen- 
iors and juniors in the courses indicated, who have attained high scholarship rank, 
are eligible for membership. 

Sigma Pi Sigma (Physics). Theta chapter of Sigma Pi Sigma, national physics 
honor society, was installed in the University in 1929. The formal statement of ob- 
jects of the society is: "To reward high scholarship and promote interest in the ad- 
vanced study of physics, to stimulate individual research, and to enable its members 
to keep pace with the progress of science." A student elected to membership must be 
taking some course in physics at the time of his election. Graduate students who are 
taking advanced work in physics and related subjects are eligible for membership. 

Sigma Xi (Scientific Research) . The Society of the Sigma Xi is a national hon- 
orary society devoted to advancement of research in pure and applied science. Mem- 
bership may be conferred upon faculty members and students who show outstanding 
ability in some field of scientific research. 

Sphinx (Senior Men's Honorary). Sphinx, Senior Men's Scholarship Society, was 
established at West Virginia University in 1909. Its purpose is to accord suitable 
recognition to students of high standing in scholarship. The local chapter acts as a 
sponsor and preserver of all such college traditions as it may find worthy; and to act 
for the inspiration, betterment, and guidance of the Freshman Class. 

Tau Beta Pi (Engineering). The West Virginia Alpha chapter of the national 
engineering honor association of Tau Beta Pi was established in the College of Engi- 
neering in 1922. Students who rank in scholarship among the upper one-eighth of 
their class are eligible to election in their third year and all who rank among the 
upper one-fourth of the class are likewise eligible in their fourth year. These to- 
gether with alumni and honorary members constitute the chapter. 

Xi Sigma Pi (Forestry) . Xi Sigma Pi, forestry honor society, was established at 
West Virginia University on May 16, 1950. The objects of Xi Sigma Pi are "to se- 
cure and maintain a high standard of scholarship in forest education, to work for 
the upbuilding of the profession of forestry and to promote fraternal relations 
among earnest workers engaged in forest activities." 

OTHER UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS 

There are in the Universitv various fraternities, sororities, societies, and clubs 
devoted chiefly to social, educational, and athletic interests of students. Some of 
the more important of these organizations are: 



46 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Social Fraternities 

Alpha Gamma Rho 
Alpha Phi Delta 
Alpha Sigma Phi 
Beta Theta Pi 
Delta Tau Delta 
Kappa Alpha 
Kappa Sigma 
Lambda Chi Alpha 
Phi Delta Theta 
Phi Kappa Psi 



Phi Kappa Sigma 
Phi Sigma Delta 
Phi Sigma Kappa 
Pi Kappa Alpha 
Pi Lambda Phi 
Sigma Chi 
Sigma Xu 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 
Theta Chi 



Social Sororities 

Alpha Delta Pi 
Alpha Phi 
Alpha Xi Delta 
Chi Omega 



Delta Gamma 
Kappa Delta 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Pi Beta Phi 



Professional Honorary Societies 

Alpha Kappa Psi (Economics) 
Alpha Tau Alpha (Vo-Ag) 
Delta Sigma Rho (Debate) 
Kappa Phi (Methodist Women) 
Mu Phi Epsilon (Music, Women) 
Phi Alpha Delta (Law) 
Phi Beta Pi (Medical) 

Honor and Recognition Societies 

Alpha Epsilon Delta (Pre-Medical) 
Alpha Psi Omega (Dramatics) 
Alpha Zeta (Agriculture) 
Chi Epsilon (Civil Eng'g) 
Chimes (Junior Women) 
Delta Nu Tau (Pre-Law) 
Epsilon Lambda Sigma (Accounting) 
Eta Kappa Nu (Elec. Eng'g) 
Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 
Kappa Kappa Psi (Band) 
Kappa Tau Alpha (Journalism) 
Li-Toon-Awa (Sophomore Women) 
Mortar Board (Senior Women) 
Mountain (Men's Honorary) 



Phi Chi (Medical) 

Phi Delta Phi (Law) 

Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia (Music, Men) 

Phi Upsilon Omicron (Home Economics) 

Sigma Theta Epsilon (Methodist Men) 

Theta Sigma Phi (Journalism, Women) 



Omicron Nu (Home Economics) 

Phi Alpha Theta (History) 

Phi Epsilon Phi (Botany) 

Phi Lambda Upsilon (Chemistry) 

Pi Delta Pi (French) 

Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Eng'g) 

Psi Chi (Psychology) 

Rho Chi (Pharmaceutical) 

Scabbard & Blade (Military) 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon (Earth Science) 

Sigma Pi Sigma (Physics) 

Sphinx (Senior Men) 

Tau Beta Pi (Engineering) 

Xi Sigma Pi (Forestry) 



National and Local Student Organizations 



Agriculture Council 

Arnold Air Society 

Associated Women Students 

Block and Bridle Club 

Canterbury Club 

Der deutsche Yerein 

Dolphin Swimming Honorary 

English Club 

Fi Batar Cappar 

Forestry Club 

General Engineering Society 

Geology Club 

Hillel 1 



Home Economics Club 

Horticulture Club 

II Circolo Italiano 

Independent Men's Association 

Independent Party 

Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship 

Journaliers 

La Tertulia 

McDowell Club 

Men's Glee Club 

Mountaineer Poultry Club 

Men's Hall Council 

Music Educator's National Conference 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 



4 7 



Newman Club 

Orchesis 

Panhellenic Council 

Philosophical Society 

Physical Education Club 

Press Club 

Recreation Majors Club 

Sociology and Social Work Club 

Student Council 

Student Marketing Club 

Student Party 

Terrace Hall 

Collegiate Academy of Science 

Collegiate F.F.A. Chapter 

Cosmopolitan Club 

Council of Fraternity Presidents 

Dairy Science Club 

University Dames Club 

University 4-H Club 

University Religious Council 

University Young Democrats 

Wesley Foundation Cabinet 

Westminster Foundation 

Woman's Hall Center 

Woman's Hall North 



Woman's Hall South 
Women's Glee Club 
Women's Recreation Association 
Writer's Forum 

Young Men's Christian Association 
Young Republican Club 
Young Women's Christian Association 
Student Branches of the following: 
American Chemical Society 
American Institute of Chemical 

Engineers 
American Institute of Electrical 

Engineers 
American Institute of Mining and 

Metallurgical Engineers 
American Pharmaceutical Association 
American Society of Agricultural 

Engineers 
American Society of Civil Engineers 
American Society of Mechanical 

Engineers 
Institute of Aeronautical Sciences 
Society for the Advancement of 

Management 
Society of WYU Mining Engineers 



Fraternity Advsiers 

Alpha Gamma Rho, Clark Butler; Alpha Phi Delta, P. Simonette; Alpha Sigma 
Phi, Marlyn E. Lugar: Beta Theta Pi, Charles D. Thomas; Delta Tau Delta, Charles 
E. Roberts; Kappa Alpha, Carter R. Bishop; Kappa Sigma, Paul R. Jones; Lambda 
Chi Alpha, H. E. Fairbanks; Phi Delta Theta, Festus P. Summers; Phi Kappa Psi, 
Kenneth Wood; Phi Kappa Sigma, Ralph White; Phi Sigma Delta, Victor J. Lemke; 
Phi Sigma Kappa, Donovan H. Bond; Pi Kappa Alpha, W. F. Hopper; Pi Lambda Phi, 
name to be announced; Sigma Chi, Leighton G. Watson; Sigma Nu, Russell H. Gist; 
Sigma Phi Epsilon, H. G. Wheat; Tau Kappa Epsilon, Martin Cobin; Theta Chi, 
K. C. Westover. 

Sorority Supervision 

Supervision of all sororities on campus is vested in the office of the Dean of Women. 



Faculty- Organizations 

American Association of University Professors. The West Virginia University 
chapter of the American Association of University Professors now has a membership 
of approximately one hundred and fifty. The present officers are Harold A. Gibbard, 
president; Donovan H. Bond, vice-president; Mavis Mann, secretary. 

Faculty Club. The Faculty Club of the University, organized on March 10, 1921, 
is composed of teaching, research, and extension staffs of the University. Members of 
the various departments of the State of West Virginia working with the University also 
are eligible. The purpose of the club is to promote friendliness, fellowship and good 
will among its members and to encourage closer ties between faculty members of 
different colleges, schools and departments. A program of social activities is conducted 
throughout the fall and winter semesters. 

Campus Club. The Campus Club is a social organization made up of women on 
the University staff as well as the wives of men on the staff. The club holds meetings 
twice each month and special meetings and functions at other times. 

West Virginia Alumni Association of Johns Hopkins. The West Virginia Alumni 
Association of Johns Hopkins, founded in 1913, holds annual meetings on February 22, 
anniversary of the establishment of The Johns Hopkins University. Graduates and 



48 GENERAL INFORMATION 



former students of Johns Hopkins are eligible for membership. Dr. A. M. Reese is 
president; Dr. Dorsey Brannan, vice-president; Dr. C. E. Watson, secretary. 

Wisconsin Alumni Club. Graduates and former students of the University of 
Wisconsin are eligible to membership in this organization. It holds social meetings 
at which speakers from that university are heard. Dr. E. O. Roberts is the present 
president of the club, organized in 1937. 

DISCIPLINE 

Rules and regulations which students are required to observe are few, simple, 
and reasonable: civil and orderly conduct; reasonable diligence in performance of the 
work prescribed; and abstinence from vices. 

All matters of discipline are in charge of the Director of Student Affairs and 
the Committee on Discipline. No student may be expelled without approval of the 
President of the University. 

Absences 

Students shall attend all classes, including laboratory sessions, for which they are 
registered, unless prevented from doing so by illness, injury, authorized University 
activities, or other reasons approved by their deans or directors. 

A student who must be absent from class for an extended period of time shall 
inform his adviser or his dean or director. 

Each college or school shall make suitable and effective provisions for handling 
absences. 

Probation and Suspension 

Any student whose mid-semester grades are below passing in courses amounting 
to more than half of the total number of semester hours for which he is registered 
shall be placed on probation for the remainder of the semester. The terms of proba- 
tion are determined by the respective scholarship committees. 

Any student whose grades at the end of any registration period are below passing 
in courses amounting to more than half the total number of semester hours for which 
he is registered shall be suspended from the University. A freshman subject to the 
operation of this rule at the end of his first registration period in residence shall be 
placed on probation for the succeeding registration period. 

A student who receives a grade of "FIW" (failure because of irregular withdrawal) 
shall, unless restored to probationary standing, be suspended from the University. The 
grade of "FIW" may be given, provided the student has been previously reported to 
his adviser and the dean or director of his college or school as having excessive 
absences, in either of the following cases: (1) the student's absences exceed 25 percent 
of the total number of the class meetings, or (2) the student is absent from all the 
class meetings during the 14 calendar days immediately preceding the period set for 
final examinations. 

All actions of the Committee on Scholarship and of the dean or director of the 
college or school that affect the standing of a student shall be reported by the dean 
or director to the Registrar. 

Duties of Instructors 

Each instructor shall be responsible for keeping an attendance record of students 
in his classes, and shall report an excessive number of absences to the student's dean 
or director and his adviser. 

Duties of Advisers 

All advisers, upon receipt of reports of excessive number of absences shall have 
conferences with the students concerned and shall make such recommendations and 
adjustments as are desirable and feasible. If the adviser does not find a satisfactory 
solution after a conference with the student, he shall report the case to the dean or 
director of his college or school. 



UNIVERSITY LIFE 49 



Duties of the Committee on Scholarship 

The Committee on Scholarship shall have authority to proceed according to 
its best judgment in regard to delinquent students referred to it for its consideration. 

All orders of the committee shall become effective when approved by the dean 
or director of the college or school. 

In the exercise of its authority the Committee shall not suspend a student 
during a semester except for wilful neglect and in cases where the student's class 
grades are so low that further class attendance would be a waste of time. No 
suspension shall become effective until approved by the dean of the college. 

Student Marriages 

If any student under the age of twenty-one years, who has not been previously 
married, intends to marry within the school year, he or she must obtain the con- 
sent of the parents 1 or guardian before such marriage shall be solemnized, in 
accordance with provisions of section 8, chapter 48, revised Official Code of West 
Virginia, 1931. 

In order to insure obedience to both the letter and the spirit of this statute 
and the policy of the University such student must, not less than one week before 
said marriage, show satisfactory evidence to the office of the Director of Student 
Affairs that consent of the parents or guardian as required by the statute has been 
obtained. 

In the event that such student does not make such showing to the office of 
the Director of Student Affairs, regardless of where the marriage ceremony is 
performed, he or she may be suspended, and may only be reinstated upon showing 
satisfactory reason to the Council of Administration why he or she failed to comply 
with this regulation. 

Where both parties to the marriage ate students and one has not complied 
with the above rule, both may be suspended as provided above. 

EMPLOYMENT AND PLACEMENT SERVICE 

Student Employment 

Students desiring part-time work may register with Miss Cornelia Ladwig, Place- 
ment Adviser. 

Until successful completion of one semester's University curricular work, fresh- 
men should not attempt outside work unless absolutely necessary. Only the excep- 
tional student can do so without danger to his scholastic status. 

The Senior and Alumni Placement Service 

The purposes of the University Placement Office are to assist those who are un- 
certain as to what occupation they wish to pursue and to assist in finding positions 
for those who have chosen a career. This is a service of the University designed 
to help students in selecting a vocation and to give them a greater scope of choice 
in their fields of interest. It does not end with placement of the student on his 
first job, but may be referred to at any time in the future. 

The Placement Office, located on Hunt Street west of Armstrong Hall, 
registers candidates for positions, interviews registrants, analyzes the changing 
markets for graduates, aids students with regard to the techniques of the employment 
interview, assists alumni seeking promotion or change of position, cooperates with all 
individuals and agencies interested in placement, and engages in continuous research 
in the interest of improving these services. A meeting place is provided by this office 
for students seeking jobs, employers on recruiting tours, and faculty members whose 
comments are sought by employers. Interviews and pre- interview meetings are 
scheduled by this office for visiting company representatives. 

A vocational library is maintained to assist any student having difficulty in deciding 
upon a career as well as to enable those graduating to review the kinds of opportunities 
available in their fields. 

(The Placement Office cannot furnish credentials to commercial agencies). 



50 GENERAL INFORMATION 



The Pharmacists' Register 

A pharmacists' register for the benefit of both the employer and employee 
has been established by the College of Pharmacy. No charge is made for services 
rendered. 



ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, FEES 

ADMISSION TO UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 
Methods of Entrance 

Candidates for admission to the University must be at least sixteen years of 
age. They may be admitted either by examination or on the basis of official 
transcripts of record. Transcripts of secondary-school record must be sent by 
the principal directly to the Registrar of the University immediately after the 
student's graduation; 2 transcripts of college or university record must be sent by 
the registrar of the other institution directly to the Registrar of the University 
immediately after the student has completed his work in that institution. Tran- 
scripts must be received by the Registrar of the University at least three weeks 
prior to the beginning of the term or semester in which the applicant is interested. 
The transcripts received in support of applications for admission become the prop- 
erty of the University and are permanently filed in the office of the Registrar. 

Applicants for admission who do not have transcripts from accredited secondary 
schools on file in the office of the Registrar of the University or who do not 
have official transcripts from colleges or universities previously attended on 
file in the office of the Registrar of the University, may, at the discretion of the 
Committee on Admissions, be permitted to register provisionally. If satisfactory 
transcripts cannot be obtained, the registration will be cancelled and the fees paid 
by the applicant will be returned, in accordance with the University refund schedule. 
A provisional registration will not ordinarily be continued for a period longer 
than one week. 

Conditional Admission. Students must make up all deficiencies before they 
can be classified as sophomores. 

Entrance Unit Defined 

Requirements for admission to colleges, schools, and divisions of the Univer- 
sity are stated in terms of units. 

A unit in any subject represents the amount of work that may be done in 
a standard high school in a year of thirty-six weeks, with five recitation periods 
per week, of no less than forty minutes each In courses in which laboratorv 
work is required, from two to three peridos of laboratory work are considered 
the equivalent of one period of recitation according to the amount of outside 
preparation required in connection with such work. 

Graduates of accredited schools may receive credit for work certified, with 
the understanding, however, that no student may enter any college, school, or 
division of the University until he has credit for 15 units, i.e., the work of the 
standard four-year college preparatory course. 

Prescribed and Elective Units 

A. Fifteen units of high-school work are required for admission to the University. 

B. The following groups are required: 



lOr of the parent living, or, if the parents be living- separate and apart, 
of the one to whom was accorded the custody of such person. 

2ln accrediting- West Virginia secondary schools the University follows the 
classification made by the State Supervisor of High Schools. 



ADMINISTRATION, REGISTRATION, FEES 



(1) Four units in English 3 

(2) Three units in a second subject 

(3) Two units in each of two other subjects 

C. The work in "A" must include the following: 

For admission to all colleges and schools, 1 unit in elementary 
algebra. 

For admission to the College of Agriculture, in the case of students 
who elect agriculture or forestry as their major field of study— 1 unit in 
elementary algebra and 1 unit in plane geometry. 

For admission to Agricultural Engineering— 1 unit in elementary 
algebra, % unit in intermediate algebra, 1 unit in plane geometry, and 
V2. unit in solid geometry.* 

For admission to the College of Arts and Sciences, in the case of 
students who intend to elect chemistry, geology, mathematics, physics, 
predental or premedical studies as their major field of study— 1 unit of 
elementary algebra and 1 unit in plane geometry. 

For admission to the College of Engineering or the School of Mines— 
Wz units in algebra, 1 unit in plane geometry, and V2 unit in solid 
geomerry. 4 

For admission to the College of Pharmacy— 1 unit in elementary 
algebra, 1 unit in history, and 1 unit in science. 

D. Work in the following subjects not to exceed the number of units placed 
after each subject will be accepted: 

Subject Units Subject Units 

English 4 Science 7 

Journalism 1 Biology 8 

Speech 1 Botany 8 

Foreign languages^ Chemistry 

French 3 General Science 

German 3 Geology 

Greek 3 Physical geography 

Italian 3 Physics 

Latin 4 Physiology i/ 2 

Spanish 3 Zoology 1 

Education 2 Commercial geography 1/2 

Mathematics, General 1 Commercial law i/ 2 

Algebra 2 Vocational subjects (not to exceed 

Plane geometry 1 5 units) 

Solid geometry 1/2 Agriculture 4 

Trigonometry 1/2 Home economics 3 

History and Social Science 6 Industrial training 3 

History 3 Bookkeeping or bookkeeping and 

Social Science 3 commercial arithmetic 2 



Drawing Commercial arithmetic (alone) 

Free-hand drawing 1 Shorthand 

Mechanical drawing 1 Typing 

Music 2 Aeronautics 



Art 

Hygiene 

Physical education 



(A student may enter the University with 3 units in English and satisfy ad- 
mission requirements by making a satisfactory grade on the English Placement 
Test, or by successfully completing- English 0, or English 1. 

In the College of Engineering, the School of Mines, and the Department of 
Agricultural Engineering, a. student may enter with only 3 units in English 
if he also presents for entrance 2 units in a foreign language. 

•iStudents entering the College of Engineering or the School of Mines may 
be admitted conditionally without solid geometry provided they are prepared 
to take Mathematics 3 as indicated by their grade in the mathematics placement 
test. The deficiency in solid geometry must be made up during the first year. 



GENER \I ENFORM \ HON 



Special Students 

Persons who do not desire to become candidates for a degree may, by per- 
mission of the Committee on Admissions and the dean of the college which 
they desire to enter, be admitted as special students, subject to the following 
provisions: 

1. Special students must as a rule be twenty-one )ears of age. 

2. Special students must satisfy at least 9 units of the requirements for ad- 
mission, including 2 units of English. 

j. Every application for admission as a special student must be presented 
in writing to the Committee on Admissions and must set forth fully the ap- 
plicant's reason, together with a detailed statement of studies he desires to pursue. 

4. Special students are subject in all respects to the usual rules relating to 
registration and scholarship. They may be assigned to classes for which they apply, 
it being understood, however, that admission to any class rests entirely with the 
instructor in charge, and further, that admission to any class when so granted 
6ot:s not necessarily imply credit for prerequisites. 

5. In the College of Law. students with less than the academic credit re- 
quired of candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Laws will be admitted as 
special students only if: 

(a) they have credit for no less than two years of work of collegiate grade 
m an institution of approved standing; 

(b) they are at least twenty-three years of age; 

(c) there is good reason, acceptable to the Scholarship Committee, for think- 
ing that their experience and training have specially equipped them to engage 
successfully in me study of law, despite the lack of the required college credit; 
and 

I'd) the number of such special students admitted each year shall not exceed 
ten per cent of the average number of students admitted by the College of Law 
as beginning regular law students during the two preceding years. 

Special Requirements for Admission 
the college of education 

Requirements for admission to the College of Education shall be the com- 
pletion of 58 semester hours of approved college work, with an average of at least 
2 grade points per credit hour. Candidates for a Bachelor's Degree in Ed- 
ucation register for their first two years of work in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Freshman and sophomores who expect to enter the College of Education will 
indicate their intention when they register. Their studies will be directed by 
advisers for pre-education students. Such students should so order their courses 
of study as to satisfy requirements for junior standing and should be fulfilling 
requirements for the certification of teachers. 

THE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM 

A candidate seeking admission to the School of Journalism with the view 
of obtaining a degree must have satisfied requirements for matriculation in one 
of the University undergraduate colleges and must have earned at least 58 
semester hours of college credit. A student deficient in physical education service 



-One unit of Latin will be accepted. No less than 2 units of either French, Ger- 
man, Greek, Italian, or Spanish will be accepted unless sufficient additional work 
in that languasre is taken in college to complete a minimum of 2 units. 

6A group of 3 units may be formed by combining 2 units of history with one 
unit of social science, or by combining one unit of history with two units of social 
science. 

7A group of 2 or 3 units in science may be made by combining one unit each 
of any 2 or 3 of the following: biology, botany, chemistry, geology, physics, and 
zoology. 

8If a student presents one unit in biology for admission, he may have credit 
for no more than V 2 unit in either botany or zoology. 



ADMINISTRATION, REGISTRATION, FEES 53 

program and military science will be required to take these subjects as soon as possible. 
During his freshman and sophomore years he should have completed satisfactorily 
all or most courses specified for prejournalism majors. A prejournalism student 
not maintaining at least a "C" average during his first two years in all college 
subjects is strongly advised not to enroll in the professional school. 

THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

All candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Laws must present three-fourths 
of the number of hours required for a haccalaureate degree from an institution of 
approved standing of which hours not more than 10 per cent may be in non-theory 
courses. All work taken after June 1, 1947, must carrv an over-all average of at 
least 2.3 grade points, or the equivalent. In computing such over-all average, 2 
grade points will be deducted for each hour of "F." Work taken before June 1, 1947, 
will be acceptable provided it carries an average grade of "C," or one grade point 
per credit hour, or the equivalent. Non-theory courses in military science and 
physical education will not be counted either in computing hours of credit or 
grade points. 

Any degree from an institution of approved standing will be regarded as 
satisfying the requirements lor admission provided that, in the opinion of the 
Scholarship Committee of the College of Law, the degree satisfies the entrance 
requirements of the Association of American Law Schools. 

Every applicant for admission must request the proper registrars to send 
directly to the secretary of the College of Law, before registration, a complete 
transcript of his record in each institution which he has attended after comple- 
tion of his secondary education. Evaluation of all credentials is made by the Registrar 
of the University. 

No applicant will be admitted who previously shall have attended another 
law school and who shall be ineligible to return to that school in good standing. 

THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

In addition to high-school requirements, the applicant for admission to the 
School of Medicine must have credit for at least three years of work in a college 
of recognized standing. This must include 90 hours of credit exclusive of military 
science and physical education. 

The ^0 hours of credit include the following subjects and hours: English com- 
position, 6 hours; physics, 8 hours; biological sciences, 12 hours (mainly zoology 
and comparative anatomy); chemistry, 20 hours (including 6 hours organic); psy- 
chology, 3 hours; a modern foreign language, 12 hours (German or French pre- 
ferred); Latin, 6 hours recommended if no high-school Latin has been taken. 

Selection of Students. The number of students the Medical School can accom- 
modate is strictly limited. Applications for admission are considered by the Com- 
mittee on Admissions of the School of Medicine, which selects those with the 
highest qualifications of scholarship and personal fitness. An important factor is 
the score of the applicant in the Medical College Admissions Test sponsored by 
the Association of American Medical Colleges and given at suitable times. Students 
should consult premedical advisers about this test or should write to Educational 
Testing Service, P. O. 592, Princeton, New Jersey. Applications for admission may 
be made as much as a year in advance of the opening date. Only bona fide 
residents of West Virginia may be considered for admission. 

Further details concerning entrance requirements to the School of Medicine 
may be obtained by writing to the Dean of the School of Medicine or to the 
Registrar of the University. A full statement concerning suggested premedical 
courses is to be found in Part II of this Catalog (pages 124-127) . 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Students who meet University entrance requirements are admitted to the 
School of Music either by examination or on certificate from an accredited second- 



54 G ENERAL INFORMATION 



ary school. Students majoring in Music will be expected to have acquired previously a 
background in the fundamentals of music and a fair ability in music reading. All 
students will be examined at least twice a year, in January and in May, to determine 
the progress made. 

In the School of Music special provision may be made to permit talented 
individuals to take work in Applied Music without credit. 

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Applicants holding Bachelors' degrees from West Virginia University or from 
other accredited institutions may be admitted to the Graduate School. Applica- 
tions for admission to the Graduate School must be filed with the Registrar of the 
University who will forward the applications to the Dean of the Graduate 
School. The applicant must request the registrar of the college or university pre- 
viously attended to send an official transcript directly to the Registrar of the Univer- 
sity. The applications and transcript should be received by the Registrar at least one 
month in advance of registration days. Application forms may be obtained from the 
Registrar of the University. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not constitute acceptance by the major 
department. It merely grants permission to seek admission to that department. 

The Dean of the Graduate School and the head of the Department in which the 
student desires to do his major work will advise him concerning departmental pre- 
requisites for candidacy for an advanced degree and major and minor advanced degree 
requirements. 

Undergraduate deficiencies, generally unsatisfactory background, or lack of ade- 
quate facilities in a given department may prevent acceptance by the department. In 
such instances, the student must either seek acceptance by another department or 
register as a "special" graduate student. A "special" graduate student is not a can- 
didate for an advanced degree. 

Eligible students who wish to further their education without reference to 
higher degrees may be admitted to the Graduate School and may elect courses for 
which they can satisfy prerequisites. 

Graduate Degrees 

Graduate degrees offered by departments in the University which have been 
approved for graduate work are as follows: 
Master of Arts (A.M.) 
Master of Music (Mus.M.) 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

Master of Science in Chemical Engineering (M.S.Ch.E.) 
Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (M.S.E.E.) 
Master of Science Civil Engineering (M.S.C.E.) 
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (M.S.M.E.) 
Master of Science in Engineering of Mines (M.S.E.M.) 
Master of Science (Home Economics Education) M.S. (H.E.Ed.) 
Master of Science (Biochemistry) 
Master of Social Work (M.Soc.Wk.) 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) 

Professional Degrees 

The following professional degrees are conferred upon graduates of the Col- 
lege of Engineering and the School of Mines of West Virginia University on the 
basis of practical experience and study in absentia, the presentation of a thesis, 
and an oral final examination. 

Aeronautical Engineer (A.E.) Electrical Engineer (E.E.) 

Chemical Engineer (Ch.E.) Engineer of Mines (E.M.) 

Civil Engnieer (C.E.) Mechanical Engineer (M.E.) 



ADMINISTRATION, REGISTRATION, FEES 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

Applicants for admission to advanced standing must satisfy ordinary require- 
ments for admission to the first-year class, must have successfully pursued the 
study of law in a school which is a member of the Association of American Law 
Schools and must have received credit for courses equivalent to those required 
of students in the College of Law. The extent of credit allowed for work done 
elsewhere is determined by the Scholarship Committe. A student will not be 
allowed credit for work carried in another law school, however, unless the stu- 
dent receives thereon a grade of "C" or its equivalent. 

Any applicant for advanced standing may also, at the discretion of the faculty, 
be required to pass examinations in any or all courses presented for credit. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Advanced studing in applied music is given only by examination. Persons 
desiring such standing should enroll at the beginning of the semester, and after 
they have become thoroughly familiar with the requirements for each semester's 
work, they may apply to the Registrar of the University for a special examination in 
which they may prove their ability to meet the requirements as outlined. 

THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

No student shall be permitted to complete the course in Pharmacy in less 
than three collegiate years in a college of pharmacy, regardless of the amount 
of credit offered for advanced standing. This is in accordance with the by-laws 
of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

VETERANS OF WORLD WAR IT OR KOREA 

The University recognizes that men and women from the Armed Forces who 
enter college require individual and personalized guidance in order to facilitate 
their entrance into the University and to aid their adjustment to University life. 
The Veterans' Coordinator is available for consultation and help in the solution of 
personal problems which may arise in the transition to civilian student life. 

Information regarding educational opportunities made possible at the University 
through provisions of the Service Men's Readjustment Act of 1944 (G.I. Bill of Rights), 
Public Law 550, and the Vocational Rehabilitation Program of the Veterans Adminis- 
tration (Public Law 16) may be obtained from the Veterans Coordinator by personal 
conference or by mail. 

Veterans may be admitted to the University by the Committee on Admissions by 
any of the following methods: 

1. Graduation from an accredited preparatory school. 

2. Presentation of 15 units of high-school work without graduation. 

3. Advanced standing from other accredited colleges or universities. 

4. Evidence of sufficient maturity and ability to do college work furnished 
by the use of United States Armed Forces Institute tests or American Council 
on Education tests. Training of any kind received in the service will be con- 
sidered and, if possible, evaluated for entrance or college credit. 

5. Veterans who present at least 9 units of entrance credit may be ad- 
mitted as special students. 

An honorably discharged veteran of World War II who has successfully com- 
pleted basic training in the Armed Forces of the United States shall be excused 
from any additional work in Basic Military and in the Physical Education Service 
Program upon submission of due proof thereof to the Registrar of the University. 

REGISTRATION 

Persons who are not registered as students in the University and who are 
not members of its administrative or teaching staffs shall not be admitted to 
regular attendance in University classes. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



All students are expected to register on days set apart for registration at the 
beginning; of each semester or term of the University All freshmen are required 
to take intelligence, placement, medical, and physical tests. 

Immediately after completion of their registration, all students are expected 
to pay their fees at the office of the Comptroller in the Administration Building. 

Visitors 

Students who are presently registered in the University may attend classes as 
visitors, provided they obtain the written permission of their advisers and of the in- 
structors in classes they desire to visit. Members of the administrative or teaching 
staffs, or other regular employees of the University, may attend classes as visitors, 
provided they obtain the written permission of the heads of their departments and 
of the instructors in the classes which they desire to visit. 

Xo record is kept of the work and attendance of persons admitted to classes 
as visitors and no credit is given for their work in such classes. 

Persons eligible to attend classes in the University as visitors may obtain the 
proper blanks from the Registrar. 

Auditors 

Students may enroll in courses without working for grade or for credit by regis- 
tering as auditors and by paying full fees. Credit or audit status must be indicated 
at the time of registration. No change in status from audit to credit or from credit 
to audit will be made at any later date. 

Late Registration 

No student will be permitted to register in the University after the eighteenth 
day of a semester or the ninth day of either term of the Summer Session, with- 
out the special permission of the dean or director of the college or the school 
which he proposes to enter. No student registering late will be permitted to en- 
roll for more hours of work than the number of weeks in actual attendance with- 
out the permission of the Committee on Scholarship of the college or school con- 
cerned . 

Withdrawal from the University 

A student who desires to withdraw from the University must obtain a with- 
drawal card from the office of the Registrar 103 Ad. Withdrawal procedure will be 
explained to him when he obtains this card. 

Students who withdraw from the University without permission will receive 
at the end of the semester a grade of "FIW" (failure because of irregular with- 
drawal) in each of the subjects for which they are registered and will be indefinitely 
suspended from the University. 

Students who desire to drop part of their work may withdraw from classes 
in which they are enrolled with a grade of "W" at any time prior to the end of the 
i he second week following the date set for mid-semestei reports. Withdrawal 
permits must be approved by the adviser and filed with the Registrar. If such 
withdrawal reduces the student's hours below the required minimum, the per- 
mit must be approved by the Scholarship Committee. Withdrawals after the 
above date will be permitted only in exceptional cases and must be approved by 
i he Scholarship Committee of the college or school m which the- student is 
registered. 

Re-entry after Withdrawal 

Students required to withdraw from one college or school of the University 
because of failure in their work and permitted to transfer to another unit of the 
University may not again register in the college or school in which they were 
originally registered without the consent of the Scholarship Committee of that 
college or school. 



ADMINISTRATION, REGISTRATION, FEES 



57 



College Credit Defined 

A college credit or semester hour represents the amount of work done in one 
semester in one recitation hour with two preparation hours a week. From two to 
three hours of laboratory work are considered equivalent to one hour of recit- 
ation, according to the amount of outside work assigned in connection with the 
laboratory hours. 

Numbering of Courses 

Courses offered in the various colleges and schools of the University are numbered 
so as to indicate the rank (freshman, sophomore, junior, senior or graduate) of 
students for whom they are intended. See page 68. 

Adviser 

The college or school in which a student is enrolled shall have jurisdiction over 
the course of study of that student. Each student upon entering the University is 
assigned to an adviser, whose duty it is to assist the student in his registration, 
to keep a record of his work, and to report his registration and standing to the 
Registrar as required. The adviser approves the student's program of studies, 
sees that all prescribed work is taken in proper sequence, approves the selection 
of elective courses, and assists the student generally in planning his course of study 
so that he may proceed systematically and without conflicts. Changes in registra 
tion must always have the approval of the adviser. The student will look to his 
adviser for guidance in all matters pertaining to his work. 



Maximum and Minimum Work 

The maximum and minimum number of hours per semester as weil as the 
maximum number of hours per vear for which a student ma) registei during 
the regular academic year of the University are as follows: 



Miriimum Maximum 
Hours per Semester 
Semester Hours per 



Year 



Agriculture 






. . . 14 


18 
18 
18 
20 
20 
18 
18 
16 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 










12 




Commerce 

Education 






12 


35 


Fntnneei "ine and M< 


?chan 


ic Arts 


14 




Forestry 




14 

14 




Home Economics 






34 


Journalism . . . 






14 


36 


Law 






13 




Medicine 






17 




Mines 




14 




Music 






14 




Pharmacy 

Physical Education 


and 


Athletics 


14 
14 





Work of the Summer Session is equivalent in character to that of the regular 

vear. One hour's credit per week is a normal load for either term; but in 

order to facilitate scheduling of courses, undergraduate students may carry 7 
hours if the periods are seventy-five minutes in length. 

A student desiring to do irregular work, more or less than the prescribed 

number of hours in any college, must obtain permission from the Committee on 
Scholarship in his college or school. This permission is not valid until it has been 
reported to the Registrar for record 



58 GENERAL INFORMATION 



Substitution for Required Courses 

A student who desires to substitute another course for any course prescribed 
in his curriculum or required tor the degree toward which he is working, must 
obtain permission tor such substitution from the Committee on Scholarship in 
his college or school, but there can be no substitution from group to group. 

Return of Books to the Library 

Students must present a signed statement from the Librarian that they have 
returned all books and paid all library fines incurred before they withdraw. No 
student will be allowed to graduate before paving all fines and returning all Library 
books. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

(Subject to change without notice) 

Fees 

All fees are due and payable at the Comptroller's office on the day of regis- 
tration. 9 Students registering pay the fees shown in table on page 59. 

Remission of Fees 

No tuition or fees, except those payable to State Special Funds or those charged to 
Special Services, shall be charged or collected by the University from any stu- 
dent registered in the Graduate School while such student is employed by the 
University on a regular appointment. Any such student who has held a regular 
University appointment for the second semester shall also be entitled to exemp- 
tion from these fees for the Summer Session immediately following his term of 
appointment. 



^Students who have not paid their fees before the close of office hours of the 
second Saturday following- the opening of a semester or a summer term, shall be 
dropped from the rolls of the University, and the Registrar shall notify their 
instructors that their class cards are to be withdrawn. 



ADMINISTRATION, REGISTRATION, FEES 



y.) 



SEMESTER FEES IN THE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 
See footnotes 10, 11 ,12 







REGULAR YEAR 




SUMMER SESSION 






Full Time 


Part Time 


Full Time 


Part Time 


REMARKS 


COLLEGE 
OR SCHOOL 


Resi- 
dent 


Non- 
resi- 
dent 


Resi- 
dent 


Non- 
resi- 
dent 


Resi- 
dent 


Non- 
resi- 
dent 


Resi- 
dent 


Non- 
resi- 
dent 




Agri., For., H. Ec. . 
Arts and Sciences. . . 

Commerce 

Education 

Engineering 


$ 42.00* 


Fees in this coiumn include £ 

out-of-state tuition. b 

o 


$ 3.00$ 10.00 

per 
credit 
hour 


$25. 75b 

or 
$31.50ac 


$40. 75b 

or 
$46.50ac 


$ 5 00$ 8.00 

per 
credit 


*Includes Contingent 
Fee ($30); Student 
Activity fee ($7) ; 
Health Service fee 
($3), and Mount- 










Physical Education, 
and Athletics . . 






figure, both terms, 
higher figure. 

blncludes Health Serv- 
ice Fee ($1). 

clncludes Health Serv- 
ice Fee ($2). 




$ 77.00* 


$177.00* 


See Summer Session Bulletin 








Pharmacy 

(See "Special Fees 
in Pharmacy") 


$ 67.00* 


$167.00* 


$ 4.00 $10.00 
per credit hour 


No instruction 
during 
the summer 


*See above 




$ 67.00* 


$192.00* 


$ 4.00 $12.00 
per credit hour 








Medical Technician. 
(Jr. and Sr. Years) 


$ 67.00* 


$167.00* 


$ 4.00 $10.00 
per credit hour 


*Sce above 




$129.00* 


$350.00* 


$ 8.00 $20.00 
per credit hour 









i"A full-time student is one who is registered for 10 or more semester hours 
of work during- each semester of the regular academic year, or 4 or more semes- 
ter hours of work during each term of the Summer Session. A full-time student 
during the regular academic year receives a student activity book which en- 
titles him to admission to all outdoor athletic events and, by the payment of an 
additional nominal amount at each event, entitles him to admission to all indoor 
athletic events held in the Field House. A full-time student during the regular 
academic year, or during the Summer Session, is entitled to free medical con- 
sultation and advice from the University physician. A moderate charge is made 
for room calls, X-rays, special laboratory tests, drugs furnished by the University 
Pharmacy, minor operations, treatment of fractures and dislocations, and in- 
travenous treatment. 

iiNo person shall be considered eligible to register in the University as a resi- 
dent student who has not been domiciled in the State of West Virginia for at 
least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registration. No nonresident 
student may establish domicile in this State, entitling him to reductions or ex- 
emptions of tuition, merely by his attendance at thp University. A minor student 
whose parents have become domiciled in West Virginia after the student's 
original registration in the University, will be deemed to have the domicile of his 
parents and be entitled to pay resident fees thereafter. Moreover, any student 
who has originally paid nonresident fees may become entitled to pay resident 
fees, if after an interim of nonattendance or otherwise he has established a 
valid legal domicile in this State at least twelve months prior to his registra- 
tion in the University. In any event, the appointment of a guardian for a minor 
student temporarily resident in West Virginia, other than the designation of a 
natural guardian, shall not in and of itself operate to establish a West Virginia 
domicile for such student. 

12A part-time student is one who is registered for fewer than 10 semester 
hours per semester during the regular academic year; or for fewer than 4 semes- 
ter hours per term during the Summer Session. 



60 (.1 NF.RAL INFORMATION 



Special Fees 

Late-registration fee (nonrefundable) 1 "■ $ 2.00 

Graduation fee'-* 10.00 

Professional Engineering degree (including $10 graduation fee) 25.00 

Student's record fee 15 1 .00 

Certificate in Agriculture 1 .00 

Associate in Arts Degree 2.00 

Special extra fee for flight training: 

A.E. 171 100.00 

A.E. 172 100.00 

A.E. 173 100.00 

A.E. 175 100.00 

A.E. 176 100.00 

A.E. 177 100.00 

Change in registration tee (alter 8th da\) LOU 

Fee for examination for entrance credit, per unit 1.00 

Fee for examination for advanced standing 3.00 

Fee for General Educational Development tests (high-school level) . . 15.00 

Social work certificate 2.00 

Fee for reinstatement of students dropped from the rolls 3.00 

Pee* for examination of candidates for graduate degrees 1.00 

Student locker fee (men) 2.50 

Student locker fee (women) 2.00 

Diploma replacement fee 5.00 

Fee for Extension Work 

A fee of $8 per semester hour is charged for each extension course offered. 

Special Fees in Medicine and Pharmacy 

Students in colleges and schools other than the College of Pharmacy and the 
School of Medicine who register tor courses in the College of Pharmacy or the 
School of Medicine shall be required to pay a fee of $4 per credit hour for such 
courses in addition to the fees charged in the colleges or schools in which they 
are registered. 

Regularly enrolled students in the College of Pharmacy are given the privilege 
of enrolling without additional fees in required Pharmacy courses offered in the 
School of Medicine. 

Regularly enrolled premedical students in the College of Arts and Sciences 
are given the privilege of registering for the following courses in the College of 
Pharmacy without additional charge: Pharmacy 2, Pharmacy 3, Pharmacy 9, Pharmacy 
106, and Pharmacy 107. 

School of Music Fees 

1. Students Registering for a Degree in the School of Music. 

Resident students. $77 per semester. Nonresident students $177 per semester. 

2. Special or Part-time Students Registering in the School of Music. 

(a) Class courses— Special or part-time students registered in the School of 
Music for class courses in music shall pay $3 per credit-hour for these courses. 



isCharged when students register after registration dates announced in the 
University Calendar, Part IV. 

i4The gradual ion fee is payable by all students at the beginning of the semes- 
ter or term in which they expect to receive their degrees. 

l'One transcript of a student's record is furnished by the Registrar without 
charge. This fee is charged for furnishing an additional transcript. 

*For graduate students not otherwise enrolled at time of final examination 



ADMINISTRATION, REGISTRATION, FEES 61 



(b) Applied Music— Special or part-time students registered in the School 
of Music for courses in applied music shall pav tuition fees as follows: 

LESSONS PER WEEK 

One Tico 

Voice S35 $55 

Piano 35 55 

Pipe-Organ 35 55 

Band and orchestra instruments 35 55 

Instrument Classes 55 per semester 

Ensemble: 

1 . Accompanying S5 per semester 

2. Chamber music S5 per semester 

(c) Special Work in Another College or School— Special or part-time students 
registered in the School of Music who take special work in another college or 
school of the University shall pay music fees plus the regular rate per credit- 
hour for the work they are taking in another college or school. 

3. Students Registered in Other Schools and Colleges. 

(a) Class Courses— Students registered in other schools and colleges of the 
University may enroll for class courses in the School of Music without paying 
aditional fees. 

(b) Applied Music— Students in other schools and colleges of the University 
who enroll for one or more courses in applied music shall pay the fees required 
in the school or college in which they are registered plus music fees as follows: 
for courses in voice, piano, pipe-organ or band and orchestra instruments, one 
lesson per week S20; two lessons S35. 

4. Piano and Pipe-organ Practice. 

(a) Piano for practice— One hour a day, S6 per semester; two hours, 510; 
three hours, $14; four hours, SIS. 

(b) Pipe-organ practice— One hour a day, $10 per semester. 

(c) Band and orchestra instruments— Rental fee S2.50 per semester. 

Deposits 

The deposits required are as follows: breakage deposit in chemistry, 57 to 
512; breakage deposit for students enrolled in medical technology course and in 
the School of Medicine, $10; for students enrolled in other colleges and schools 
of the University electing courses in medical technology or medicine. $5 for one 
laboratory course and $10 for more than one course; military science deposit, $10; 
breakage deposit in pharmacy, S10. 

Refunding of Fees 

A student who withdraws regularlv 10 from the University may arrange for a 
refund of fees by submitting to the Comptroller approval by the Registrar of 
the refund. Semester fees will be returned in accordance with the following 
schedule: 

Amount of Refund 

During first and second weeks All fees less S2.50 

During the third and fourth weeks 80% of fees 

During the fifth and sixth weeks 60% of fees 

During the seventh and eighth weeks 40% of fees 

Beginning the ninth week No refunds allowed 

COST OF AN ACADEMIC YEAR'S WORK 

A student's textbooks will cost approximately $50 a year, and his registration 
fees §84 to $258 if he is a resident; or S284 to S700 if a nonresident. Students 

i6To withdraw regularly a student must apply to the Registrar for permis- 
sion. The withdrawal permit must be approved by the student's adviser and the 
dean of the college and filed in the Registrar's office. 



62 GENERAL INFORMATION 



in engineering will use drawing instruments costing from $40 to $50. The lab- 
oratory breakage deposit required ranges from $7 to $12, a part of which is 
usually returned at the end of the year. In military and air science a $10 deposit is 
required to cover military equipment in the custody of the student, practically 
all of which is returned to the student when he accounts for his equipment. 
Board and room may be obtained at from approximately $459 to $549 a year. A 
student's laundry will cost from $25 to $35 a year. Traveling expenses, cloth- 
ing, and other miscellaneous items will depend largely upon the tastes and hab- 
its of the individual student. In general, however, it may be said that the legiti- 
mate cost of a 9-month term of residence at the University ranges from $700 to 
$1,000 a year. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

Candidates for degrees are eligible for graduation upon completion of the 
requirements, in the college or school in which they are registered, which were 
in effect at the time of their first registration in that college or school, pro- 
vided they apply for graduation within a period of seven years from the time of 
their first registration. Students who fail to complete the requirements for grad- 
uation within seven vears from their first registration in the college or school in 
which they are candidates for degrees, shall satisfy the requirements in effect 
at the time they apply for graduation. 

All University degrees are conferred by the Board of Governors upon recom- 
mendation of the faculties ol the various colleges and schools. Degrees are 
granted at the close of the semester or Summer Session term in which the students 
complete their work. 

Candidates for degrees to be conferred at the close of the second semester 
must be present in person to receive their degree unless excused by the deans or 
directors of their colleges or schools. 

Baccalaureate Degrees 

credits and grade points required 

Less than 6 hours in an ancient or modern language will not be counted 
toward any University degree, diploma, or certificate unless work in the same 
language has been offered for entrance. 

Six hours of English composition and rhetoric (English 1 and 2) are re- 
quired of all candidates for the Bachelor's Degree in all colleges and schools 
of the University. 

Eight hours of basic military or air science and tactics are required of all freshmen 
and sophomore men not specifically exempt. 1 7 

Two hours of physical education for men (P.E. 1 and 2), to be taken during the 
first year in residence, and four hours of physical education for women (P.E. 1-16, 57, 
101-104) , to be taken during the first and second years in residence, are required for 
graduation, except in the case of students entering with advanced standing amount- 
ing to 58 semester hours or more. 

Each undergraduate who begins college work after June 1, 1952, must pass 
a proficiency examination in English, after the beginning of his junior year in order 
to qualify for graduation. He shall take the examination during the first semester 
of his junior year, and if not declared proficient, shall repeat the examination as 
many times as necessary. The examination shall be administered by the English 
Proficiency Board. 

Each baccalaureate degree is conditioned upon the completion of a specified 
number of semester hours of credit. Eor a tabular statement of the number of 
credit hours required for each degree, see the last column on page 61 under the 
caption "Classification of Students." 

All divisions of the University require minimum standards of scholastic quality. 
Grade points are computed only on grades earned at West Virginia University 

iTSee pages 18-19. 



A DMINISTRATION, REGISTRATION, FEE S 63 

(including Potomac State School of West Virginia University). To be eligible 
for graduation, a student must have an average of "C" or an average of two grade 
points on all work for which he received grades (except "W" and "WP"). The Col- 
lege of Education, in addition to the general average of two grade points per 
credit hour in all subjects, requires an average of two grade points per hour of 
credit in Education and in each teaching field. 

It is the student's responsibility to keep informed on his grade point standing. 
This information may be obtained at any time from the dean or director of the 
college, school, or division in which the student is registered. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Effective June 1, 1949, the University established the practice of awarding "Honors" 
and "High Honors" to qualified students who are candidates for their initial bac- 
calaureate degrees. (Candidates from the College of Law are excluded.) The follow- 
ing regulations govern these awards: 

1. The computation of the average shall begin with the student's penultimate 
term or semester and continue in reverse chronological order until at least 54 semester 
hours have been counted. If, in order to total the required number of hours, it is 
necessary to include any part of a semester or term the work of the whole semester 
shall be included. 

2. No graduate shall be eligible for honors unless he shall have completed at 
least half of the semester hours required for his degree in West Virginia University. 

3. The senior year must be at the University. 

4. No graduate shall be eligible for honors if his grade point average for his 
final semester or term is less than 3.0. 

5. Subject to the above conditions, all candidates for a baccalaureate degree 
whose average, as shown by the portion of the work used, is 3.6 or above, shall be 
graduated with "High Honors." All those whose average is less than 3.6 but 3.3 or 
above, shall be graduated with "Honors." 

6. Fitting recognition of graduation with honors shall be made on the candidate's 
diploma and on the commencement program. 

REQUIREMENTS AS TO RESIDENCE 

Students who come to the University from other colleges or universities are 
advised to make the transfer not later than the beginning of their third year and 
in no case will a student who matriculates in the University later than October 
1 in any year be permitted to receive a degree at the next commencement. 

In special cases students who desire to leave the University at the close of 
their third year to enter another institution with the purpose of taking a combined 
course leading to two degrees or of preparing for graduate study may, upon ap- 
plication beforehand to the Committee on Scholarship of the college or school 
in which thev are registered, be permitted to do the work of the fourth year, 
or a part thereof, at such other institution and to receive the Bachelor's Degree 
from the University upon the presentation of the proper credits. 

Except in the College of Law, no student will be granted a Bachelor's Degree 
by the University who has not done either a total of 90 hours or the last 30 hours 
of his work in actual residence at the University. 

No student may receive the Degree of Bachelor of Laws without at least 
three semesters in residence at the College of Law and the successful completion 
of courses aggregating at least one-half of the total number of hours required for 
graduation. 

WORK DONE OUT OF RESIDENCE 

It is the policy of the University to discourage the taking of regular residence 
courses in absentia. In the case of courses begun at the University and not com- 
pleted because of illness or for other acceptable reasons, however, permission to 
complete the work in absentia under the direction of the regular University in- 
structors giving the courses may be granted by the Committee on Scholarship; but 



(it 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



in such case credit should be given only upon a report of the grade of no less 
than "C" on final examination. 

This regulation does not apply to University extension courses. 

CREDIT IN CORRESPONDENCE WORK 

Credit up to a maximum of 30 semester hours for work completed by cor- 
respondence in non-laboratory courses will be accepted by the University when 
such work is given by accredited colleges or universities that accept this work 
for credit toward their own degrees and whose residence work is accepted by 
West Virginia University. In compliance with an order of the State Board of 
Education, however, credits obtained in correspondence courses will not be con- 
sidered in certifying students for teachers' certificates. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

The following table shows the number of semester hours required for classi- 
fication as second-year, third-year, and fourth-year students and for graduation, ac- 
cording to the curricula in the several colleges, schools, and divisions. First-year stu- 
dents must satisfy the requirements for admission as set forth on pages 47 to 50. 
inclusive. 

HOURS REQUIRED TO CLASSIFY AS 

Second- Third- Fourth- Required 

COLLEGE AND DEGREE Year Year Year for 

Student Student Student Degree 
Agriculture, Forestry, and 
Home Economics 

B.S. (Bachelor of Science) 26 64 100 144 

B.S. in Agriculture (B.S. Agr.) 26 64 100 144 

B.S. in Forestry (B.S.F.) 30 70 110 150 

B.S. in Home Economics (B.S.H.E.) 25 58 92 128 

Agriculture & Engineering 

B.S. in Agr'l Eng'g (B.S.Agr.E.) 30 72 112 154 

Arts and Sciences 

Associate in Arts (A.A.) 25 .. .. 64 

Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) 

Regular 25 58 92 128 

Premedical 32 58 96 128 

Combined (Medicine)" 32 58 96 132 

Combined (Law)" 25 58 96 124 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 

Geology 32 58 99 132 

Chemistry 34 58 103 136 

Combined (Medicine) 2 <> 32 58 96 132 

Social Work 25 58 92 128 

Commerce 

B.S. in Bus. Ad. (B.S. Bus.) 58 99 123 

B.S. in Ec. (B.S.Ec.) - 58 99 1 32 

Education 2 i 

B.S. in Education (B.S.Ed.) 58 92 128 



isFourth year in School of Medicine. 
"Fourth year in College of Law. 
2*oThird and fourth years in School of Medicine. 

2iFor the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Education, at least 10 hours of the 
residence work must be in Education. 



ADMINISTRATION, REGISTRATION, FEES 



65 



HOURS 

Second- 
COLLEGE AND DEGREE Year 

Student 
Engineering 22 

Bachelor of Science 27 

B.S. in Aero. Eng'g (B.S.A.E.) 30 

B.S. in Chem. Eng'g (B.S.Ch.E.) 30 

B.S. in Civil Eng'g (B.S.C.E.) 30 

B.S. in Elec. Eng'g (B.S.E.E.) 30 

B.S. in iVfech. Eng'g (B.S.M.E.) 30 

Journalism 

B.S. in Journalism (B.S.J.) 

Law 

Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) 21 

Medicine 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 

Medical Technician 25 

Mines 

B.S. in Engg of Mines 

(B.S.E.M.) 30 

M usic 

Bachelor of Music (B.Mus.) 30 

Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharmacy (B.S.Phar.) 

Retail Pharmacy 30 

Industrial Pharmacy 30 

Physical Education and Athletics 
Bachelor of Science in Physical 

Education (B.S.P.E.) 28 

Bachelor of Science in Recreation 

(B.S.Rec.) 28 



REQUIRED TO CLASSIFY AS 

Third- Fourth- Required 

Year Year for 

Student Student Degree 



bO 


94 


133 


72 


112 


154 


72 


112 


154 


72 


112 


154 


72 


112 


154 


72 


112 


154 


58 


92 


128 


50 




81 



58 



100 



135 



72 


112 


154 


64 


102 


136 


70 


108 


142 


70 


108 


144 


58 


92 


128 


58 


94 


130 



EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

Courses 

As a rule courses extend through one semester only. 23 

Examinations 



MID-SEMESTER AND FINAL EXAMINATIONS 

In practically all courses offered in the University, the student receives both 
a preliminary or mid-semester grade and a final grade. The mid-semester stand- 
ing of a student is based on the daily recitation grades and a special test given 
during one or more regular recitation periods. Mid-semester grades are not en- 
tered on the Registrar's records. The final grade is based on the class standing 
for the entire semester and on a written final examination 24 to which a special 
period of two or three hours is devoted, except that the manner of determining 
the final grade of seniors and graduate students provisionally approved for grad- 

22Students matriculating with 58 or more hours of credit may graduate with 
148 hours, since physical education is not required of these students. 

23ln the College of Law all courses extend either the entire year or 
through one semester. No credit will be given for less than an entire course 
except by special order of the Committee on Scholarship. Grades given at the 
end of the first semester in courses extending throughout the year are merely 
indicative of the quality of work done by the student to that point and do not 
give credit for the part of the course so far pursued. Such first-semester grades 
may be considered in determining- the final grade. 

24See 12 per cent rule under "Absences" on page 45. 



66 GENERAL INFORMATION 



uation at the end of the semester or term is left with the head of the depart- 
ment. Any student not satisfied with his grade, however, has the right to take the 
examination with his class if he so desires. 

EXAMINATION PERIODS 

Mid-semester examinations are held during the week immediately preceding the 
day of the mid-semester reports as set forth in the University Calendar. Final exami- 
nations are held during the last week of each semester of the academic year, and during 
the last two days of each term of the Summer Session. 

ABSENCE FROM EXAMINATION 

Students are required to take all regular examinations. If a student attends 
a course throughout the semester and is absent from examination without permission, 
the instructor shall count the examination as zero and report the final grade as 
"F." If, in the opinion of the instructor, absence of the student was for satis- 
factory reason, the fact will be recorded on the student's class ticket, the grade 
"I" will be returned, and the student may, upon application to the instructor, 
take the examination at a later date. 

INCOMPLETES AND FAILURES 

If the final grade of a student in any course is "F," the student must take the 
course again if he desires to receive credit for it. The grade of "I" is given when an 
instructor believes that the course work is unavoidably incomplete or that a supple- 
mentary examination is justifiable. The grade of "I" can be removed by examination 
or completion of the work of the course. A grade of "I," not removed within the 
following semester or the next semester in which the student is in residence, becomes 
a failure unless special permission is granted by the appropriate Scholarship Com- 
mittee to postpone removal. 

Reports 

Mid-semester grades are reported to students' advisers and 10 cleans or di- 
rectors but are not recorded in the office of the Registrar. 

Final grades are reported by instructors directly to the Registrar's office. Final 
grades must be in the hands of the Registrar within 48 hours after the closing hour 
of the examination. This rule also applies to the final grades of all students registered 
in other colleges or schools of the University who are enrolled in law courses. 

The final standing of all seniors provisionally approved for graduation shall 
be reported by their instructors to the deans or directors ol then colleges or 
schools, and the final standing of all graduate students provisionally approved for 
graduation shall be reported to the Dean of the Graduate School not later ihan 
the last day of recitation of the second semester. For this purpose special report 
cards are supplied by the Registrar. 

A report of each student's work is made at the close of the semester or 
Summer Session to the student himself and to his parents or guardian. 

Scholastic Standing and Grade Points 
grading system 

A— excellent (given only to students of superior ability and attainment) 

B— good (given to those students who are well above the average but who are 

not in the highest group) 
C— fair (average students) 
D— poor but passing 2 ^ 
F— failure 

25Veterans of World War II or Korea may register for courses in which they 
have a grade of "C" or higher, but no credit will be given for the new listing. 



ADMINISTRATION, REGISTRATION, FEES 



I— incomplete 
FIW— failure because of irregular withdrawal 

W— all withdrawals prior to the end of the second week following the date 
set for mid-semester reports 
WP— withdrew passing subsequent to the end of the second week following the 

date set for mid-semester reports 
WF— withdrew failing subsequent to the end of the second week following the 
date set for mid-semester reports 
X— auditor, no grade and no credit 

GRADE POINTS 

The grade-point average is computed on all work for which the student has 
registered, except for the courses with grades of "W" and "WP," and is based on the 
following grade-point values: 



A 


B 


C 


D 


F 


FIW 


WF 


I 


X 


4 


3 


2 


1 


















Provided, however, that when a student receives a grade of "I" and later removes the 
incomplete grade, his average grade-point standing shall be calculated on the basis of 
the new grade. 

Students are permitted to register in any course for which a grade of "D" has 
been received. In such cases the second grade shall supersede the first, provided it 
is not lower than "D." 



Part II 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



ABBREVIATIONS 

The following abbreviations are used in the announcements of courses: 

I— a course given in the first semester. 
II— a course given in the second semester. 
I, II— a semester course given in each semester. 
I and II— a course given throughout the year. 

S— a course offered in the Summer Session. 
SI— a course given in first term of the Summer Session. 
SI I— a course given in second term of the Summer Session, 
hr.— number of credit hours per course, 
cone— concurrent registration required, 
consent— consent of instructor. 
PR— prerequisite. 

PLAN FOR NUMBERING COURSES 

For convenience each course of study is designated by the name of the depart- 
ment in which it is given and by the number of that course. The plan of number- 
ing is as follows: 

Courses 1 to 99— courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores. 

Courses 100 to 199— courses intended primarily for juniors and seniors. 

Courses 200 to 299— advanced courses for juniors, seniors, and graduates. 

Courses 300 to 399— courses open to graduate students only. 

SCHEDULES 

Before the opening of each semester, a schedule is printed announcing the courses 
that will be offered in the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Econmoics; 
the College of Arts and Sciences; the College of Commerce; the College of Education; 
the School of Journalism; the Division of Military and Air Science and Tactics; the 
School of Music; and the School of Physical Education and Athletics. Schedules are 
prepared for the College of Engineering and the School of Mines, the College of Law, 
the College of Pharmacy, and the School of Medicine but are not printed. 



68 



The College of Agriculture 
Forestry, and Home Economics 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, 
AND HOME ECONOMICS 

Agricultural, forestry, and home economics work at West Virginia University 
is organized under the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics. 
For the purpose of administration the College is divided into three branches: 

I. The Agricultural Experiment Station, organized for research and ex 
perimental work. 
II. Resident instruction in agriculture, in forestry, and in home economics. 
III. Extension work in agriculture, forestry, home economics, and boys' 
and girls' club work, given by the Division of Agricultural Extension 
to citizens of the state who are not in residence at the College. 
The work of these divisions is closely interrelated. Although some members of 
the staff devote full time to college instruction, research, or extension work, many 
others divide their time among two or three of the divisions. 

History 

In 1897 the College of Agriculture was established as a distinct college in the 
University. The Agricultural Experiment Station, founded in 1888, became part of 
the College at the time the latter was instituted. The Agricultural Extension Division 
was added in 1913, and in 1914 the Department of Home Economics was transferred 
from the College of Arts and Sciences. Organization of the College was completed in 
1937 when a full four-year course in forestry was added. The name of the unit then 
was changed to "The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics." 

The West Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station 

The Experiment Station was established by the Board of Regents in 1888 by 
authority of an Act of Congress known as the Hatch Act. Further support was given 
by Acts of Congress known as the Adams Act, the Purnell Act, the Bankhead- Jones 
Act, and the Research and Marketing Act of 1946. 

The objects and purposes of the Experiment Station as stated in the Hatch 
Act are: 

"to conduct original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of plants and 
animals; the diseases to which they are severally subject with the remedies for the 
same; the chemical composition of useful plants at the different stages of growth; 
the comparative advantages of rotative cropping as pursued under varying series of 
crops; the capacity of new plants or trees for acclimation; the analysis of soils and 
waters; the chemical composition of manures, natural or artificial, with experiments 
designed to test their comparative effects on crops of different kinds; the adoption 
and value of grasses and forage plants; the composition and digestibility of the dif- 
ferent kinds of foods for domestic animals; the scientific and economic questions in- 
volved in the production of butter and cheese; and such other researches and experi- 
ments bearing directly on the agricultural industry of the United States as may in 
each case be deemed advisable, having due regard to the varying conditions and needs 
of the respective states and territories." 

69 



70 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Under the Purnell Act the work of the Experiment Station is enlarged to include 
research in farm economics, rural sociology, and certain phases of home economics 
which relate to nutrition and the use of foods. The work of the Experiment Station 
is also supported by State appropriations. 

Besides the provision for expanding certain types of research which were author- 
ized previously, the Bankhead-Jones Act provides specifically for research looking 
toward improvement of quality in agricultural products and by-products and in 
manufacture, and also for research relating to the conservation, development, and 
use of land and water resources for agricultural purposes. 

The Research and Marketing Act greatly enlarges the scope of the previous 
acts by providing for expansion of research in home economics, nutrition, market- 
ing, and production of agricultural products, and further provides for new researches 
in housing, farm structures, introduction of new plants and animals, and for enlarged 
cooperation with federal, state, and private agencies. 

At present, investigations are being conducted in the fields of agricultural bio- 
chemistry, agricultural economics and rural sociology, agricultural engineering, 
agronomy and genetics, animal husbandry, dairying, forestry, home economics, hort- 
iculture, plant pathology, and entomology. These investigations are classified into 
133 research projects. 

BRANCH AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS 

Branch experiment stations are maintained at Wardensville, Point Pleasant, 
Kearneysville, and Reedsville. The Reymann Memorial Experimental Farms at War- 
densville, a gift received in 1917 from the estate of Lawrence A. Reymann, occupy 
987.5 acres of farm land on the Cacapon River in Hardy County. The farm is 
being operated on an experimental basis involving pasture improvement, erosion 
control, soil rebuilding, water conservation, crops, beef cattle, sheep, and poultry. 

The Ohio Valley branch experiment station of 150 acres at Point Pleasant on 
the Ohio River was acquired in 1945 from the War Assets Administration. It is 
operated as a unit for the experimental production of tobacco and truck and 
field crops of special interest to the farmers of the Ohio and Kanawha Valleys. 
From this Station, supervision extends to the area at Lakin formerly operated by the 
Experiment Station, but operated by West Virginia State College. 

The University Experiment Farm, a tract of 158 acres near Kearneysville, in 
the eastern fruit section, was established in 1930 as a branch experiment station 
for the study of problems relating to fruit production, including insect and disease 
control, as well as problems of general farming typical of the section. The inseci 
investigations are carried on in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Economic 
Entomology. 

The Reedsville Experiment Farm in Preston County was acquired through trans- 
fer of the dairy farm of the Arthurdale Association by the Federal Housing Authority 
for the purpose of contributing to the welfare of the community and the people of 
West Virginia through demonstration and research. Work on this 457-acre farm 
consists of programs with potatoes, ornamentals, small fruits, corn and legumes 
in rotations, livestock, hillculture, and agricultural engineering. 

Bulletins and quarterly reports setting forth the results of experiments and in- 
vestigations conducted at the Station are published for gratuitous distribution and 
will be mailed to any citizen of the State who applies for them. 

Cooperative Extension Work 

By act of the Legislature in 1913, amended in 1915, the Agricultural Extension 
Division was created and established in the College of Agriculture for the purpose 
of promoting improvement and advancement of agriculture, domestic science, and 
rural life among the people of the state. 

County Extension agents carry on a continuous program of demonstration 
coupled with all available means for disseminating information on problems re- 
lating to production techniques, marketing, and soil conservation. They demon- 
strate new and improved varieties of crops, methods of insect and disease con- 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 71 



trol, methods of cultivation, proper fertilization, and use of labor-saving devices 
and techniques in harvesting. 

Farmers are assisted with the solution of problems relating to livestock breeding, 
diseases and their control, and feeding and marketing. Farmers also are helped 
with problems relating to management of their farms, securing of credit, combin- 
ation of farm enterprises, and keeping of farm accounts. 

Receiving major attention in the home phase of farm problems are those re- 
lating to nutrition, including production and conservation of foods, food selection for 
good nutrition, meal planning and preparation, and food preservation. Clothing 
for the family also receives attention. Care, repair, and operation of the sewing 
machine are demonstrated, as are short cuts and improved methods of sewing, and 
selection of materials. Attention is given to child care, training, and development 
and the use of labor-saving devices in the home. 

All Extension workers have a deep interest in rural youth of the state. Through 
4-H club work, young people are introduced to many improved practices in agri- 
culture and homemaking. This program emphasizes the four-fold development of 
head, heart, health, and hand. 

The primary function of the Agricultural Extension Service is education. The 
chief purpose of Extension is to teach people to help themselves. The organization 
is financed jointly by the federal, state, and county governments. 

In 1929 the Legislature established at Jackson's Mill, Lewis county, a State 
4-H Camp which has grown from 5 to 523 acres. Fourteen cottages erected by various 
counties together with the assembly hall, swimming pool, dining room, and 
other buildings and equipment, furnish facilities for a series of camps, conferences, 
and meetings running throughout the year. It is the pioneer development of its 
kind in the world. 

The Agricultural Extension Service cooperates with Oglebay Institute in carry- 
ing out the educational program at Oglebay Park near Wheeling. Bv arrangement 
with the Wheeling Park Board, the facilities of this park are used by the Institute 
for camps, conferences, and fairs. The chief purpose of this type of program is to 
train and develop leadership in music, recreation and other forms of leisure-time 
activities, as well as in handicrafts and art. 

Short Courses and Special Schools 

In addition to the instruction of collegiate grade offered, the College of Agri- 
culture, Forestry, and Home Economics maintains a series of annual short courses 
with special schools for the benefit of adult residents in the state who wish to obtain, 
in brief periods, education in certain fields. The department of dairy husbandry 
has sponsored milk and ice cream courses for dairy plant operators and workers. 
The Horticulture Extension School i<= held each year in the Eastern Panhandle. 
One-day schools are held at Romney and Wheeling. The annual sessions concern 
many production, disease-control, and marketing problems of the Panhandle fruit 
grower. 

Buildings and Equipment 

The administration offices and main of t he laboratories and classrooms of the 
College are in Oglebay Hall. The building contains on the basement floor the 
creamery and dairy laboratories, four-chambered cold storage plant and ice machine, 
the mailing room, and laboratories for animal husbandry. The first floor is devoted 
to the Offices of Administration of the College, the Experiment Station, and the 
Extension Service: the Department of Agronomy; the Division of Home Economics; 
and to agronomy and the home economics laboratories. The second floor houses the 
Departments of Rural Organization and Animal Husbandry as well as the editorial 
offices and provides six recitation rooms and three home economics laboratories. On 
the upper floor are situated the Department of Horticulture, and Animal Husbandry. 

The agricultural editor's office is located in the basement of Woodburn Hall. 

The Extension Service also has several offices in the Spruce Street Annex. 

In Oglebay Annex are situated the offices of the Department of Dairy Husbandry, 
and some of the laboratories of the Agricultural Engineering Department. 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



The Department of Plant Pathology, Bacteriology, and Entomology with offices, 
classrooms, and lahoratories, occupies a section of Brooks Hall. 

The old Experiment Station building houses on the first floor the office and labora- 
tories of the Agricultural Biochemistry Department. The second floor is occupied In 
the soils laboratories and offices. 

Beaumont House Annex houses the offices and laboratories of the Department 
of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology. 

The Forestry building across Stadium Bridge houses in its two upper floors the 
Division of Forestry, and in its basement and first floor, the laboratories and office 
of the Department of Agricultural Engineering. 

The Home Management Houses are situated at 128 Willey Street, and 298 Prospect 
Street. The Nursery School is located at 549 Price Street. 

The College of Agriculture now has 990 acres of land lying at a short distance 
from the University buildings. This land is definitely organized into a series of five 
farms operated respectively as Animal Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry, Poultry Hus- 
bandry, Agronomy, and Horticulture units. Each of the farms is equipped with 
modern farm buildings and with special buildings for experimental, laboratory, and 
classroom work. The Animal Husbandry Farm contains a 40-acrc woodlot which is 
used for instruction and experimentation in forestry. 

At Alvon, in Greenbrier County, the Division of Forestry maintains Camp 
Wood, devoted to field instruction in land surveying and timber estimating for 
students in the division who have passed two years of the professional fore^m 
course. The camp, situated in the Monongahela National Forest, is equipped 
with permanent buildings for instruction and living accommodations 

The Division of Forestry also has 498 acres of forest land in Randolph Countv 
which is being used for research and educational training. In addition to (his 
work, the tract is used by extension foresters to demonstrate sustained yield and 
forest operation for the production of hardwood timber. 

During 1951, an agreement was completed between the University and the Island 
Creek Coal Company making the 3,000-acre Island Creek Experimental Forest avail- 
able for research in applied forestry. The experimental work conducted here is open 
to inspection by forestry students. 

Cooper's Rock State Forest, an area of 13,000 acres fronting on Cheat Lake, is 
less than ten miles from the institution. By agreement between the University and 
the Conservation Commission of West Virginia an 8,000-acre part of this forest has 
been set aside as the West Virginia University Forest, Division of the Cooper's Rock 
State Forest. This area is managed by the Division of Forestry for research and 
educational purposes. 

With its farm land, buildings, and equipment the College of Agriculture, 
Forestry, and Home Economics is enabled to offer thorough and complete training 
in most branches of agriculture and forestry which are applicable to West Vir- 
ginia conditions, and to provide adequate training in several fields in home economics. 

As part of ihe work in several of the courses offered in the College, visits 
are made to large farms, specialized farms or farming regions, and city markets. 
Students are expected to pay their own expenses, which are kept at a moderate 
figure. 

Student Activities 

Every student entering judging courses offered in the college has the oppor- 
tunity of competing for a place on livestock, meat, dairy cattle, dairy products, 
poultry, and fruit-judging teams. Qualified teams compete at regional, national, 
and international contests. 

Numerous organizations on the Campus are open to University students. Of 
special interest to students of agriculture, forestry, or home economics are the Agri- 
culture Council, Mountaineer Poultry Club, Mountaineer Collegiate Chapter of 
Future Farmers of America, Forestry Club, Dairy Science Club, Home Economics 
Club, University 4-H Club, Alpha Zeta, (agricultural honorary) , Phi Upsilon Omicron 
(home economics honorary), and Alpha Tau Alpha (agricultural educational 
organization). 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 73 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Courses and Hours: Messrs. Armentrout, Percival, Pohi.man, Varney; Miss Noer. 

Scholarship: Miss Amick; Messrs. True and Hill. 

Student Placement and Farm Practice: Messrs. Henderson, Hyre and Marsh. 

Library:]] Messrs. Ackerman and Brooks; Miss Brown. 

faculty Executive: Messrs. Varnfy, Black. Goodspeed, Pohi.man, and Luchok; Miss 

Dietrich. 
Student Aid and ('.rants: Messrs. Butler, Dorsfy, and Miss Schultz. 

STATION STAFF COMMITTEES 

Station Projects: Messrs. Toben, Olson, Tryon, and Foster. 

Station Publications: Messrs. Schubert, Anderson, G. C, and Barnftt. 

HJoint Committee of the College and Experiment Station. 



Division of Agriculture 



The training offered in agriculture is adapted to fit the student for farm life 
or professional and business fields. Graduates may engage in farming as managers 
or as farm owners, in the teaching of agriculture in high schools or colleges, in 
extension work as county agents or specialists, in research work in experiment sta- 
tions or other organizations, or in many of the federal activities in aid of agriculture. 
They may engage in business related to farming, such as dairy manufactures, meat 
processing, seeds and nursery stock, feeds and fertilizers, or marketing. 

For the use of students, the following laboratories are maintained in the 
college: agricultural chemistry, agronomy, soils, genetics, animal husbandry, animal 
pathology, dairy husbandry, entomology, agricultural economics, rural sociology, 
agricultural engineering, horticulture, nutrition, plant pathology, and poultry hus- 
bandry. 

The Dean of the College of Agriculture will act as adviser for all agriculture 
students and will assign students to other advisers whom he may designate. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



The Division of Agriculture offers four-year courses leading to the following 
degrees: (1) Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, (2) Bachelor of Science, and (3) 
Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering. The degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Agriculture, together with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the College of Arts 
and Sciences, may be acquired in five years. The Division of Agriculture also offers 
a two-vear curriculum leading to the Certificate in Agriculture. Graduate work 
is discussed on page 84. 

Tor graduation, an average of 2 grade points per credit hour is required for all 
courses taken, whether passed or failed. 

The "semester hour" is the standard for computing the amount of work 
required for graduation. The "hour" represents the amount of work done in 
one semester (eighteen weeks) In one recitation with two preparation hours a 
week, or three hours, practice or laboratory work requiring no outside preparation. 

No student may register for less than 14 hours or more than 20 hours of work 
in any one semester without special permission. 

Students who are not required to take military science must substitute elective 
credits. First-year English (English 1 and 2 or their equivalent) must be completed 
before any upper-division courses may be pursued for credit towards the degree. 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 

The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 
is designed to provide a broad and well-grounded training in the general field 
of agriculture so that the graduate may be prepared for occupations requiring such 
general knowledge, and may have the necessary foundation for such specialization as 
he may elect to pursue. 

The requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture are: 

1. Constants, or courses required of all qualifying for this decree. 

2. Courses to be taken in the field of the student's major interest. 

3. Free electives sufficient to bring the total number of credits to 144 semester 
hours. 

4. A grade-point average of not less than two points per semester hour. 
All candidates for the degree must take the following courses: 
Biology: Biology I (4 hr.) and Biology 2, Botanv 2 or Zool. 3 (4 hr.). 
Chemistry: Chem. 1 and 2 (8 hr.). 

English: Eng. 1 and 2 and Eng. 18 (3 hr.) . 

Economics: Agr. Econ. 102 (3 hr.). 

History: Hist. 2 (3 hr.). 

Mathematics: Math. 11 (3 hr.). 

Military: Military or Air Science 1. 2, 3, and 4 (men) (8 hr.). 

Physical Education: P.E. 1 and 2 (men) (2 hr.); (women) (4 hr.). 

Physics: Physics 1 and 3 and 2 and 4 (8 hr.) (Vocational Agriculture students not 
included) . 

Political Science: Pol. Sci. 101 (3 hr.) (Vocational Agriculture students not 
included) . 

In addition to the above constants, each student is required to take the courses 
under the curriculum. At least 20 hours given in the department in which the 
student is majoring are required. 

After requirements have been met, electives may be chosen without restriction 
as to college or department, with the approval of the adviser. Required and elective 
hours taken in the College of Agriculture, however, must total at least 60. Provision 
is made for upper-division students who may wish to elect certain lower- division 
subjects such as languages. 

Students who wish to specialize may select majors in Agricultural Economics, 
Agricultural Mechanics, Agronomy and Genetics, Animal Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry, 
Dairy Manufacturing, Horticulture, Landscaping, Poultry Husbandry, and Vocational 
Agriculture. Students desiring a more general knowledge of agriculture, particularly 
those who expect to farm for themselves or go into Extension work, may pursue a 
curriculum in General Agriculture. 

The following curricula indicate course requirements in each of the majors: 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

This curriculum is designed principally to prepare students for advanced study 
in the field. Students who are interested in agricultural economics but plan to seek 
employment without graduate study are advised to major in General Agriculture and 
elect agricultural economics courses. 





FIRST 


YEAR 




SECOND 


YEAR 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


A. H. 11 


3 


•Botany 2, 




Agron. 1 4 


Agr. Econ. 106 3 


•Biol. 1 


4 


Zool. 3, or 




D. H. 11 3 


Agr. Econ. 131 3 


•Chem. 1 


4 


Biol 2 


4 


*Ag. Econ. 102 3 


Agron. 2 4 


•Eng. 1 


3 


•Chem 2 


4 


•Math 11 3 


•Eng. 18 3 


•Mil. or Air Sci 


.1 2 


•Eng. 2 


3 


•Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 


•Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 


•P. E. 1 


1 


•Mil. or Air Sci. 
•P. E. 2 
P. H. 1 


2 2 

1 
4 


•Physics 1 & 3 4 


•Physics 2 & 4 4 



17 18 

'Constants required in all curricula. 



19 



19 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



THIRD 


YEAR 




FOURTH 


YEAR 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Agr. Econ. 104 3 


•Hist. 2 3 


Agr. Econ. 


271 3 


Agr. Econ. 250 3 


A. H. 101 3 


Rural Soc. 105 3 


Phil. 106 


3 


Electives 14 


Hort. 3 3 


Electives 12 


Electives 


12 




♦Pol. Sc. 101 3 










Elective* 6 











18 



18 



IS 



17 



Select electives in accordance with the following outline. 
Group A. Elect 24 hr. from the following courses in agriculture. 

1. Elect not less than 2 hr. from: 
Agr. Econ. 102. 206. 230. 

2. Elect not less than 3 or more than 6 hr. from: 
Ag. M. 120, 153, 170. 

3. Elect not less than 3 nor more than 6 hr. from: 
Agron. 205. 210, 254: Genetics 254. 211, 221. 

4. Elect not less than 6 nor more than 12 hr. from: 

An. H. 141. 142. 143. 167. 222: P. H. 103: An. Path. 102: D. H. 12, 107, 123, 222. 

5. Elect not more than 3 hr. from: 
Hort. 102, 106, 206, 213. 

6. Elect not less than 4 nor more than 6 hr. from; 
Bact. 141; Entom. 102, 103; PL Path. 103, 106, 206. 

7. Elect not less than 3 hr. from: 
Rural Org. 134: Forestrv 183. 

Group B. Elect 6 hr. from: 

Econ. Ill, 119, 235, 241. 
Group C. Elect 3 hr. from: 

Hist. 182, Psvch. 1; Pol. Sci. 231; Sociol. 102, 229. 
Frff Eifcttvfs: 11 hr. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

This curriculum is intended for agricultural students who are interested in the 
production and primary processing of crops and livestock, in county agent and 
other extension work, in soil-conservation work, and in sales and other work 
which deals directly with farm people. To an increasing extent, the operations 
on the farm are being mechanized through use of power and machinery. Con- 
sequently, the student must have an acquaintance with machinery, power, elec- 
trical equipment, soil conservation, farm buildings, and other Agricultural Mech- 
anics subjects that relate to production and processing. Such training is in- 
cluded in this curriculum. 





FIRST 


YEAR 




SECOND 


YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


A. H. 11 


3 


♦Botany 2, 




•Ag. Econ. 102 3 


D. H. 12 


3 


*Biol. 1 


4 


Zool. 3, or 




•Math 11 3 


*Eng. 18 


3 


*Chem. 1 


4 


Biol 2 


4 


M. E. 20 3 


M. E. 11 


2 


*Eng. 1 


3 


*Chem 2 


4 


•Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 


•Mil. or Air Sci. 


4 2 


•Mil. or Air 


Sci. 1 2 


*Eng. 2 


3 


•Physics 1 & 3 4 


♦Physics 2 & 4 


4 


•P. E. 1 


1 


•Mil. or Air Sci. 


2 2 


Electives 3 


Electives 


4 



►P. E. 2 
P. H. 1 



17 18 

'Constants required in all curricula. 



18 



18 



76 



CURRK I LA AND COURSES 



THIRD 


YEAR 






FOURTH YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Agr. Econ. 104 


3 


Agron, 2 


4 


Ag. M. 20 


2 


Ag. M 113 


3 


Agron. 1 


4 


*Hist. 2 


3 


Ag. M 151 


3 


Ag. M 153 


3 


Hon. 3 


3 


Hon. 106 


3 


Ag. M 175 


3 


Ag. M 159 


3 


PI. Path. 103 


3 


M. E.ys r ] 


2 


Electives 


9 


Ag. M 170 


3 


*Pol. Sc. 101 


3 


Electives 


6 






Ag. M 200 


2 


Electives 


3 




— 






Electives 


5 



19 



18 



17 



19 



CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

The Animal Husbandry Curriculum is outlined to give students sufficient courses 
in the fundamental sciences, and adequate course work in other fields of agriculture 
to balance their knowledge of agriculture as a whole. The Animal Husbandry courses 
required and taken as electives will give students a good foundation to continue 
graduate work in their chosen major, or to be employed in special lines of work open 
to students majoring in this field. 



FIRST YEAR 



First Sem. 



Hr. 



*Biol. 1 4 

*Chem. 1 4 

*Eng. 1 3 

Hort. 3 3 

* Mil. or Air Sri. 1 2 
*P. E. 1 1 



Second Sem. 



Hr. First Sem. 



* Botany 2 4 
*Chem. 2 4 
*Eng. 2 3 

* Mil. or AirSci.2 2 
•P. E. 2 1 

P. H. 1 4 



SECOND YEAR 

Hr. Second Sem. 



Agron. 1 4 

A. H. 11 3 

Chem. 31 4 

►Ag. Econ. 102 3 
*Math. 11 3 

*Mil. or AirSci. 3 2 



Hr. 

Agron. 2 1 

Bact. 141 4 

*Eng. 18 3 

►Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 
Zool. 3 4 



18 



19 



17 





THIRD 


YEAR 


FOURTH 


YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


A. H. 101 


3 


Agr. Econ. 131 3 


Agr. Econ. 104 


3 


Agron. 254 


4 


A. H. 167 


3 


A. H. 138 2 


An. Path. 102 


3 


A. H. 222 


3 


D.H. 11 


3 


Etom. 102 4 


Genetics 221 


3 


Electives 


11 


*Physics 1 and 3 4 


*Hist. 2 3 


Electives 


9 






*Pol. Sc. 101 


3 


* Physics 2 and 4 4 










Elective 


2 


Electives 3 











18 19 

'Constants required in all curricula. 



18 



18 



Suggested Electives: An. Path. 206 (3 hr.); Hist. 182 (3 hr.); Ag. M. 175 (3 hr.); 
P. H. 103, 201 (3 hr.) ; A. H. 141 (3 hr.) ; A. H. 143 (2 hr.); Rural Org. 134 (2 hr.); 
A. H. 203 (3 hr.); A. H. 142 (3 hr.); A. H. 162 (3 hr.); A. H. 202 (2 hr.); Agron. 
210 (3 hr); Ag. M. 153 (3 hr.); PL Path. 103 (4 hr.); D. H. 12 (3 hr.); Speech 11 
(either semester, 3 hr.); Forestry 183 (3 hr.); Biochemistry 220 (4 hr.) ; Zoology 
271, (4 hr.). 

CURRICULUM IN AGRONOMY AND GENETICS 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

This curriculum is suggested for students who plan to become research workers 
or instructors in farm crops or soils, or who later expect to become engaged in 
agricultural activities where knowledge of soils or field crops production is of a 
major importance. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 





FIRST 


YEAR 




SECOND 


YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


*Biol. 1 


4 


♦Botany 2 


4 


Agron. 1 


4 


Agron. 2 


4 


*Chem. 1 


4 


*Chem 2 


4 


Chem. 51 


4 


•Eng. 18 


3 


•Eng. 1 


3 


•Eng. 2 


3 


•Math 11 


3 


•Mil. or Air 


Sci. 4 2 


*Mil.or AirSci. 1 2 


•Mil. or AirSci. 


2 2 


•Mil. or Air Sci. 


3 2 


•Physics 2 and A 


*P. E. 1 


1 


*P. E. 2 


1 


•Physics 1 and 3 


Electives 


6 


Agr. Elective 


3 


Agr. Elective 


4 












17 




18 




17 




19 




THIRD 


YEAR 




FOURTH YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


A. H. 101 


3 


Botany 161 


4 


•Ag. Econ. 102 


3 


Agron. 254 


4 


Bact. 141 


4 


*Hist. 2 


3 


Genetics 221 


3 


Electives 


.14 


Hort. 102 


4 


Hort. 1 


4 


PI. Path. 103 


4 






•Pol. Sc. 101 


3 


Electives 


7 


Speech 11 


3 






Electives 


4 






Electives 


6 







18 



18 



19 



18 



For crops majors Zoology 3, Entomology 102, and Genetics 220 are required. 
For soils majors Geology 1 and 2 are required. 

Electives should be chosen primarily from courses listed below, and include at 
least 5 hr. of Agronomy and Genetics. 



Agr. Econ. 104, 206 

Ag. M. 151, 153, 159, 175 

Agron. 205, 210, 215, 230, 231, 

251, 252 
A. H. 11 
Botany 273 



D. H. 11 
Genetics 222 
Language— 6 hr. 
Math. 3 and 4 
PI. Path. 202 



CURRICULUM IN DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

The curriculum in Dairy Husbandry is planned to give the student interested in 
dairy production a thorough training in this field. It is designed to train leaders 
in the dairy field. Students completing this curriculum should be qualified to operate 
successfully their own farm or to serve as herdsmen, farm managers, field men, county 
agricultural agents, milk sanitarians etc., or to continue in the educational field. 



First Sem. 

•Biol. 1 4 

"Chem. 1 4 

•Eng. 1 3 

•Mil. or Air Sci. 1 2 

•P. E. 1 1 

Agr. Elective 3 



FIRST YEAR 
Hr. Second Sem. 



•Botany 2 4 

•Chem. 2 4 

D. H. 2 3 

•Eng. 2 3 

•Mil. or Air Sci. 2 2 



P. E. 2 



SECOND YEAR 



Hr. First Sem. 



Hr. Second Sem. 



•Ag. Econ. 102 3 

Chem. 31 4 

D. H. 11 3 

•Math. 11 3 

•Mil. or AirSci. 3 2 



1 * Physics 1 and 3 4 



Hr. 



Agron. 2 4 

Bact. 141 4 

•Eng. 18 3 

•Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 

•Physics 2 and 4 4 



17 17 

Constants required in all curricula. 



19 



17 



( IRRK lULA AM) COURSES 



First Sem. 

Agron. 1 

A. H. 11 

A. H. 101 

An. Path. 102 

Genetics 111 
or 221 
*Pol. Sc. 101 



THIRD YEAR 

Hr. Second Sem. Hr. First Sem. 

4 Agron. 254 4 Agr. Econ. 

3 D. H. 123 2 D. H. 107 

3 *Hist. 2 3 D. H. 221 

3 Speech 1 1 3 Electives 

Electives 6 



2-3 



FOURTH YEAR 

Hr. Second Sem, 
104 3 A7-ri~-WT~ 
3 D. H. 222 



Electives 






Hr. 



18-19 18 19 19 

♦Constants required in all curricula. 

Suggested Electives: Zool. (4 hr.); P. H. 1 (4 hr.); Hon. 3 (3 hr.); Agron. 210 
- (3 hr.); Agron. 205 (2 hr.); A. H. 167 (3 hr.); A. H. 222 (3 hr.); Agr. Econ. 105 
(3 hr.); Agr. Econ. 131 (3 hr.); Agr. Econ. 230 (2-3 hr.); Agr. Econ. 235 (2 hr.); 
Ag. M. 159 (3 hr.); Ag. M. 170 (3 hr.); Ag. M. 175 (3 hr.); Ag. M. 153 (3 hr.); 
Dairy Bact. 246 (4 hr.); D. H. 103 (3 hr.); Entom. 102 (4 hr.); Libr. Sci. 1 (2 hr); 
Agr. Biochem. 318 (3 hr.). 



CURRICULUM IN DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

The curriculum given in Dairy Manufacturing below is designed for those stu- 
dents planning to enter the dairy industry as plant men, fieldmen or technicians. 

FIRST YEAR 
Hr. Second Sem. H 



First Sem. 

*Biol. 1 4 

*Chem. 1 4 

*Eng. 1 3 
* Mil. or Air Sci. 1 2 

*P. E. 1 1 

Agr. elective 3 



* Botany 2 4 

*Chem. 2 4 

D. H. 12 3 

*Eng. 2 3 

•Mil. or Air Sci. 2 2 
*P. E. 2 1 



SECOND 


YEAR 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Chem. 31 4 


Bact. 141 4 


*Ag. Econ. 102 3 


*Eng. 18 3 


*Math. 11 3 


•Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 


•Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 


♦Physics 2 and 4 4 


* Physics 1 and 3 4 


Electives 6 


Electives 3 





17 



17 



19 



19 





THIRD 


YEAR 




FOURTH 


[ YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Agr. Biochem 


Agr. Econ. 235 2 


D. H. 103 


3 


D. H. 104 


3 


218 


3 


Agr. M. 113 2-3 


D. H. 107 


3 


D. H. 204 


4 


Agr. Econ. 


160 2 


IT H. 1^8 1 


Electives 


12 


Electives 


11 


D. H. 102 


3 


D. H. 222 1-2 










D. H. 11 


3 


♦Hist. 2 3 










D. Bact. 246 


4 


Speech 11 3 










*Pol. Sc. 101 


3 


Electives 2 












18 


18-20 




18 




18 


♦Constants 


required 


in all curricula. 











Suggested Electives: P. H. 1: Genetics 111: A. H. 167. 11. 101; Hort. 3; Chem. 105; 
Agron. 1; Agr. Econ. 104, 131; D. H. 221; Math. 4; Zool. 3; Agr. Econ. 230; Agr. 
Biochem. 220. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



79 



CURRICULUM IN GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 



FIRST 


YEAR 


SECOND 


YEAR 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


*Biol. 1 4 


*Biol. 2 4 


Agron. 1 4 


Agron. 2 4 


*Chem. 1 4 


•Chem. 2 4 


Chem. 31 4 


*Eng. 18 3 


*Eng. 1 3 


*Eng. 2 3 


*Ag. Econ. 102 3 


P. H. 1 4 


•Mil. or AirSci. 1 2 


•Mil. or AirSci. 2 2 


Hort. 3 3 


•Mil. or AirSci. 4 2 


*P. E. 1 1 


•P. E. 2 1 


•Math. 11 3 


Electives 6 


Agr. elective 3 


Agr. elective 4 


•Mil. or AirSci. 3 2 





17 



18 



19 



19 



THIRD 


YEAR 




F( 


)URT] 


A YEAR 




First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


A. H. 101 3 


Entom. 102 


4 


Agr. Econ. 




Agr. Econ. 




Bact. 141 4 


•Hist. 2 


3 


Elective 


3 


elective 


3 


D.H. 11 3 


•Physics 2 and 4 


4 


An. Path. 102 




Ag. M. elective 


3 


•Physics 1 and 3 4 


Speech 1 1 


3 


or PL Path. 




Forestry 183 


3 


•Pol. Sc. 101 3 


Electives 


3 


103 
Ag. M. elective 


3-4 
3 


Electives 


9 








Genetics 1 1 1 and 












112, or 221 


3 












Electives 


7-6 







17 17 19 18 

♦Constants required in all curricula. 

CURRICULUM IN HORTICULTURE 
Degree: Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

The Horticulture curriculum in production of fruits, vegetables, and flowers has 
been revised recently to meet the current needs of students who desire to have their 
own commercial enterprise or a sound professional training for filling a position with 
an established organization. The low investment required for the production of 
small fruits, vegetables, bulb crops, and nursery stock presents unlimited opportuni- 
ties for young men with a thorough horticultural training. Small areas of tillable 
land in West Virginia demand use of the intensive type of horticultural crops if the 
greatest return is to be realized. Local marketing of horticultural crops is no problem 
in most of West Virginia, since the demand exceeds the supply. 

Certain courses offered in Horticulture are designed to interest nonagricultural 
students who desire to use the subject matter for improving their daily living or 
hobby interests. These courses deal with home grounds beau tificat ion in Horticulture 
139, home vegetable and fruit production in Horticulture 3, and propagation in Hor- 
ticulture 104. 





FIRST 


YEAR 






SECOP 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 




Hr 


First Sem. Hr. 


Hort. 102 


4 


•Botany 2 




4 


Chem. 31 4 


•Biol. 1 


4 


•Chem. 2 




4 


•Ag. Econ. 102 3 


•Chem. 1 


4 


•Eng. 2 




3 


Hort. 139 3 


•Eng. 1 


3 


Hort. 1 




4 


•Math. 11 3 


•Mil. or Air Sci 


.1 2 


•Mil. or Air 


Sci. 


2 2 


•Mil. or AirSci. 3 2 


•P. E. 1 


1 


•P. E. 2 




1 


•Physics 1 and 3 4 



Second Sem. 



Hr. 



Agron. 2 4 

Bact. 141 4 

•Eng. 18 3 

Hort. 141 or 

104 3 

•Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 

•Physics 2 and 4 4 



18 



18 



19 



20 



80 



CURRICULA \\I) COURSES 





THIRD 


YEAR 






FOURTH YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Agron. 1 


4 


Entom. 102 


4 


Ag. M. 175 


3 


Ag. M. 113 


3 


Pl\ Path. 103 


4 


*Hist. 2 (or 




Botany 221 


4 


Agron. 210 


3 


*Pol. Sc. 101 


3 


52 and 53) 


3 


Genetics 221 


3 


Hort. 141, 104, 




Hort. 206 


3 


Hort. 106 


2 


Hort. 213, 




212, or 233 


3 


Electives 


3 


PI. Path. 204 




232, or 239 


3 


Electives 


8 






205, or 206 


3 


Electives 


4 










Electives 


6 











17 18 17 17 

♦Constants required in all curricula. 

Suggested Electives: Agr. Econ. 104, 131; Ag. M. 113, 151, 159, 170, 175; Agron. 1, 
25, 215, 230: Art 11, 12, 30; A.H. 11, 104, 101; Geol. 1; Botany 274; Bus. Adm. 
245, 270; Chem. 5; D. H. 11; Econ. Ill: Entom. 103; Eorestrv 183; Hort. 140, 
141, 142, 143, 147, 148, 239; Languages; Libr. Sc. 1; Math. 4; PL Path. 313. P. H. 
1 ; Speech 1 1 . 

CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPING 
Degree: Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

The field of ornamental horticulture is broad, for it includes the work of nursery- 
men and landscape operators, as well as greenhousemen and florists, both in pro- 
duction and merchandising. There is a rapidly developing interest in this field in 
West Virginia. Because of this, opportunities for employment of graduates are 
increasing. 

Because of the breadth of the field, two different curricula are offered to fit 
the needs of the student, landscaping and production. Courses for the latter are 
listed under the Curriculum in Horticulture. The first two years are devoted to a 
broad, basic foundation as preparation for specialization during the junior and senior 
years. Emphasis is placed on a sound understanding of the basic principles involved. 
In addition to this, one twelve-week Summer Session is required, for those lacking 
experience, where practical aspects of garden construction and maintenance and 
nursery practices are emphasized. 

Students with a city background will fit into this field much more readily than 
in some other phases of agriculture. 







FIRST 


YEAR 








SECOND YEAR 


First Sem. 
*Biol. 1 
*Chem. 1 
*Eng. 1 

Hort. 102 
•Mil. or Air 


Sci 


Hr. 

4 
4 
3 
4 
.1 2 


Second Sem. 
* Botany 2 
•Chem. 2 
*Eng. 2 
Hort. 1 
•Mil. or Air 


Sci. 


Hr. 

4 
4 
3 
4 
2 2 


First Sem. 
Art 11 
Chem. 31 
Hort. 139 
Math. 2 or 
M. E. 20 


Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

3 Agron. 2 4 

4 Art 12 3 
3 Had. 141 4 

3 3 Hort. 141 3 
3 Math. 4 or 10 3 



P. E. 



P. E. 2 



* Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 *Mil. or Air Sci.4 2 



18 



18 



18 



19 



THIRD 


YEAR 




FOURTH 


YEAR 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


C. E. 5 


4 


Ag. M. elective 3 


Botany 273 4 


*Phvsics 2 and 4 4 


*Ag. Econ. 102 


3 


*Eng. 18 


3 


Genetics 221 3 


PI.' Path. 205 3 


Hort. 239 


4 


Entom. 102 


4 


*Phvsics 1 and 3 4 


Electives 10 


PI. Path. 103 


4 


Geol. 1 


3 


Pol. Sc. 101 3 




Electives 


3 


♦Hist. 2 (or 
52 and 53) 
Hort. 104 


3 
3 


Electives 3 





18 19 

'Constants required in all curricula. 



17 



17 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRTCLLTl RK 



81 



Suggested Electives: Agr. Econ. 104, 131; Ag. M. 113, 151, 159, 170, 175; Agron. 1, 25, 
215, 230; Art 11, 12, 30; A. H. 11, 104, 101; Geol. 1; Botany 274; Bus. Adm. 245, 
270: Chem. 5: D. H. 11: Econ. HI: Entom. 103; Forestry 183; Hort. 140, 141, 142, 
143, 147, 148, 239; Libr. Sci. 1; Math. 11; PI. Path. 313; P. H. 1; Speech 11, 
Languages. 

CURRICULUM IN POULTRY HUSBANDRY 
Degree: Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

The curriculum in Poultry Husbandry is designed to give the student a thorough 
knowledge of subject matter necessary for poultry raising, poultry improvement work, 
management of a poultry breeding farm, and as a basis for graduate training for 
teaching and research in Poultry Husbandry. Students may select elective courses to 
meet their special needs. 



FIRST YEAR 



First Sent. 



Hr. 



Second Sem. 



>Biol. 1 4 

*fhem. 1 4 

>Eng. 1 3 

►Mil. or Air Sci. 1 2 

>P. E. 1 1 

Agr. elective 4 



*Chem. 2 4 

♦Eng. 2 3 

♦Mil. or Air Sci. 2 2 

*P. E. 2 1 

P. H. 1 4 

♦Zool. 3 4 



SECOND YEAR 



Hr. First Sem. 



Hr. Second Sem. 



Hr. 



Chem. 31 4 

*Ag. Econ. 102 3 
♦Math. 11 3 

*Mil.or AirSci. 3 2 
♦Physics 1 and 3 4 

Electives 3 



Bact. 141 4 

*Eng. 18 3 

*Mil.or Air Sci. 4 2 
♦Physics 2 and 4 4 

Electives 4 



18 



18 



19 



17 



THIRD 


YEAR 






FOURTH YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


An. Path. 102 


3 


♦Hist. 2 


3 


P. H. 109 


1 


An. Path. 206 


3 


Genetics 221 


3 


P. H. 108 


1 


P. H. 201 


4 


ZooL-232-" 


r, 


♦Pol. Sc. 101 


3 


Electives 


14 


P. H. 211 


2 


Electives 


'V 


P. H. 103 


3 


t - l, - £- ' 


".» j 


Zool. 271 


4 




P. H. 106 


2 






Electives 


7 






Electives 


4 












/// 



i 



18 18 

'Constants required in all curricula. 



18 



18 



Suggested Electives: Agr. Econ. 104, 131; A. H. 11, 101, 167, 203; Agron. 1; D. H. 11; 

Entom. 102; P. H. 105, 110, 111, 213; Speech 11; Ag. M. 159, 170. 

In addition to the above required courses the student will be required to take at 
least 3 hours of Animal Husbandry, and Horticulture, and 4 hours of Agronomy. 



CURRICULUM IN VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

The State Board of Education has set up definite requirements applicable to all 
college graduates desiring to teach in West Virginia high schools. These requirements 
specify the kind and number of various sciences and agricultural courses as well as 
courses in professional education subjects, all of which are necessary to qualify 
graduates for certification. This curriculum is designed to prepare students for a 
teaching career in the field of vocational agriculture, with provisions for teaching 
biology as a second field. To meet the state requirements for teaching vocational 
agriculture, a B. S. Degree in Agriculture is required. This curriculum satisfies the 
requirements for this degree. 



82 



CURRICt I \ AM) COURSES 



FIRST YEAR 



First Sem. 
*Eng. ] or 

Eng. 1 (Com.) 

A.H. 11 
*Biol. 1 
*Chem. 1 



Hr. 

3 

3 
4 
4 



Second Sem. 

*Eng. 2 or 
Eng. 2 (Com.) 
Poul. Husb. 1 

*Biol. 2 

•Chem. 2 



Hr. 

3 

4 
4 
4 



•Mil.or AirSci. 1 2 *Mil. or Air Sci. 2 2 



P. E. 1 



P. E. 2 



SECOND YEAR 



F/rsJ Sem. 



Hr. 

3 
4 



Hon. 3 
Agron. 1 
Eng. 18 or 
Eng. 21 (Com.) 3 
Soc. Sci. 1 4 

Hist. 1 3 

•Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 



Second Sem. 



Hr. 



Agron. 2 4 

*Hist. 2 3 

Eng. 5 or 6 3 

Soc. Sci. 2 4 

•Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 



Elective 



3 



17 



18 



19 



19 





THIRD 


YEAR 






FOURTH 


YEAR 




First Sem. 




Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 




Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr 


•Math. 11 




3 


Bact. 141 


4 


Ag. Econ. 


104 


3 


Educ. 114 


3 


Ag. Mech. 


152 


3 


Ag. Mech. 153 


3 


D. H. 11 




3 


Educ. 120 


2 


A. H. 101 




3 


Forestry 183 


3 


Educ. 160 




3 


Educ. 124 


4 


*Ag. Econ. 


102 


3 


Educ. 106 


3 


Electives 




9 


Educ. 276 


2 


Educ. 105 




3 


Electives 


5 








Rural Org. 


118 2 


Elective 




3 












H. Educ. 1 
Elective 


80 2 
3 



18 18 18 18 

♦Constants required in all curricula. 

Note : Fifteen hours of electives must be in Agriculture. To meet requirements for a 
certificate, a student must complete : M*usic 10 ; Art 30 or 130 ; Animal or Plant Pathol- 
ogy ; total of nine hours of Agricultural Mechanics. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science is designed for 
those who are interested in teaching agricultural science and especially interested in 
research. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 

Degree: Bachelor of Science 

Students who expect to do graduate work in preparation for teaching agri- 
cultural science in colleges and universities or for research work in experiment 
stations, or for other work in specialized fields of basic agricultural science, may 
register for the Curriculum in Agricultural Science. Only those students who 
have a high-school record above average and who are capable of maintaining 
a scholarship average of "B" or above should follow this curriculum. Success in grad- 
uate work will depend upon better-than-average undergraduate scholarship, and such 
undergraduate work must include adequate preparation in biology, mathematics, 
English, and foreign languages. The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred 
upon the satisfactory completion of this curriculum. At least 45 hours of courses in 
the College of Agriculture are required. 



FIRST 


YEAR 






SECOND 


YEAR 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 




Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


•Biol. 1 4 


* Botany 2 




4 


Bact. 141 


4 


•Hist. 2 or 52 


*Chem. 1 4 


•Chem. 2 




4 


Chem. 5 


4 


and 53 3 


*Eng. 1 3 


•Eng. 2 




3 


*Ag. Econ. 102 


3 


•Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 


Math. 2 or 3 3-4 


Math. 3 or 


4 


3 


*Eng. 18 


3 


Speech 11 3 


•Mil. or Air Sci. 1 2 


•Mil. or Air: 


Sci. 


2 2 


Math. 4 (if not 




Quan. Chem. 6 4-5 


•P. E. 1 1 


•P. E. 2 




1 


taken earlier) 
•Mil. or Air Sci. 3 


3 

2 


Zool. 3 4 



17-18 



17 



19 



16-17 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



83 





THIRD 


YEAR 




FOURTH YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Chem. 233 


5 


♦Physics 2 and 4 4 


Electives 


18 Electives 


18-19 


t German, 




tGerman, 








French or 




French, or 








Spanish 


3 


Spanish 3 








* Physics 1 and 3 4 


Electives 1 1 








*Pol. Sc. 101 


3 










Electives 


3 











18 



18 



18 



18-19 



•Constants required in all curricula. 
tTake in junior or senior year. 
At least 4S hours of agriculture are required. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Agricultural Engineering is the application of engineering principles to agri- 
culture. Success in the application of engineering fundamentals to the agricultural 
industry requires knowledge of both biological and physical sciences. The pur- 
pose of the course it to give the student who completes it general training in 
agriculture and in engineering fundamentals. Considerable stress is given to the 
basic requirements of animal and plant life on the farm which affect engineering 
practices, but greater emphasis is made on a thorough knowledge of those under- 
lying principles and methods which are the foundation of all engineering pro- 
Cessions. 

Although the curriculum gives no opportunity for specialization, Agricultural 
Engineering is made up of four major fields. These are Farm Power and Machinerv, 
Farm Structures, Soil and Water Conservation, and Rural Electrification. 

Students preparing to take Agricultural Engineering should present for entrance 
as many units as possible in mathematics, chemistry, and physics; also, sufficient 
farm experience to meet the College of Agriculture requirements. 

Some of the organizations and industries employing agricultural engineers are 
electric power companies and co-operatives; farm machinery manufacturers and 
distributors; manufacturers and distributors of building materials, oil companies; 
electric equipment and other suppliers for farm utilities: trust companies; farm 
management agencies; federal agencies such as Soil Conservation Service, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, Federal Land Bank, and Indian Service; colleges and 
universities; Army and Navy, and foreign governments. 

Opportunities for employment are numerous. At no time since the establishment 
of the profession has it been crowded, and the outlook is good for a continuance of 
this situation. With agriculture becoming increasingly mechanized, the demand 
for agricultural engineers is increasing and should continue to increase. New 
opportunities arise as mechanization continues. Starting salaries are in line with 



salaries in ot 


her branches of engineering. 








<^u_ ■>_ - ( 


CURRICULUM IN 


AGRICULTURAL 


ENGINEERING 




FIRST 


YEAR 






SECOND 


YEAR 


H, 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


English 1 
Math. 3 


3 

3 


English 2 
Math. 5 


3 
4 


Phys. 105 
Phys. 107 


4 

1 


Phys. 106 
Phvs. 108 


4 

1 


Math. 4 


3 


Chem. 2 


4 


Math. 107 


4 


Math. 108 


4 


Chem. 1 


4 


Mil. or Air 


Mil. or Air 




Mil. or Air 




Mil. or Air 




Sci. 2 


2 


Sci. 3 


3 


Sci. 4 


2 


Sci. 1 
P.E. 1 
M.E. 20 


2 

1 
3 


P.E. 2 
C.E. 1 
M.E. 26 


1 
2 
3 


Agron. 1 
M.E. 29 


4 
4 


M. 101 
Botany 2 


3 
4 



G. 1 Lectures 



19 



19 



19 



18 



$4 



(LRRK li,A AM) COl'RSES 



Summer Session Following First Year 



M.E. 11 2 

M.E. 12 1 



Economics .") 3 

M.E. 7 1 






THIRD 


YEAR 




FOURTH YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


H 


Speech 13 


2 


M. 104 


3 


C.E. 115 


2 


Bus. 5 


3 


M. 102 


4 


M.E. 113 


4 


Hon. 3 


3 


Agr. Eng. 190 


3 


E.E. 102 


4 


M.E. 222 


3 


Agr. Eng. 140 


3 


Agr. Eng. 110 


2 


Chem. 131 


4 


Dairy H. 12 


3 


Agr. Eng. 230 


4 


Agr. Eng. 100 


3 


M.E. 221 


3 


E.E. 103 


4 


C.E. 122 


3 


Agron. 2 


4 


G. 101 


Vl 


G. 102 


Vl 


G. 103 


V2 


G. 104 


] 










M.E. 123 


2 


M.E. 203 


4 










C.E. 201 


1 








17i/ 2 




17i/ 2 




18i/ 2 




19i 






TOTAL HOURS— 154 









Vi 



GRADUATE WORK 

Graduate work leading to the Master of Science Degree is offered in all branches 
of agriculture and in home economics education. In certain branches, courses 
leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy are offered. The student who plans 
to pursue graduate work is directed to the Graduate School announcements in 
the University Catalog. Advancement in any of the professional fields is depend- 
ent on graduate study, and the student desiring to pursue such work should plan 
to continue in graduate study upon completion of the undergraduate curriculum. 
A limited number of graduate assistantships which permit half-time devotion to study 
are available in the Division of Agriculture and in the Experiment Station. 

Teachers of vocational agriculture may combine graduate work in Agriculture 
and Education by taking 16 to 20 hours in Agriculture and 10 to 14 hours in 
Education to fulfill requirements for the M.S. Degree. 

CERTIFICATE IN AGRICULTURE: TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM 

Students who may wish to acquire technical training in the field of scien- 
tific agriculture, but who do not care to meet all requirements for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, mav register for the two-year curriculum 
leading to the Certificate in Agriculture. Requirements for entrance are a high- 
school diploma. The first year's work is designed to give the student basic 
studies in some of the principal fields of Agriculture. The second year's work is 
more flexible, allowing the student to specialize in some field of Agriculture if he 
so desires. 

Seventy hours of work are required, this work to include 6 hours of English, 
2 hours of physical education, and 6 hours of militarv science (if not exempted). 
At least 4.5 hours of credit must be taken in the College of Agriculture. Students 
in this curriculum can complete this course without regard to grade points; 
however, no credit can be transferred to the four-year course unless the grade 
in such course is "C" or above, and prerequisites have been met for the course. 

Students pursuing the two-vear course can. under certain conditions, transfer 
credits to a four-vear course. Students enrolled in a four-vear course can transfer 
to the two-vear curriculum, provided they do so prior to completion of two vears of 
study or prior to enrolling for their third year. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Only the technical courses offered primarily for students in Agriculture are 
described here. For detailed description of other courses listed as required or 
elective in the agricultural curriculum, see the announcement of courses in the 
College of Arts and Sciences or in other colleges. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 85 



Admission to any advanced elective course is conditional upon the consent of 
t fie instructor. 

ASSIGNED TOPICS 

In order to be eligible to take courses 180, 181, Assigned Topics, the student must— 

1. Have completed 100 hours of work and have a grade point average of 2.5 or 
above. 

2. Present, in advance, a written outline of the work to be done as an assigned 
topic. This outline must be acceptable to the Dean of the College and the departmental 
head concerned. 

Item 1 above does not apply to special students and students in the 2-Year Cur- 
riculum. 

A student may not receive credit toward graduation for more than 4 hours of 
assigned topics. 

AGRICULTURE 

Dean Varney, Asst. Dean VanLandingham, Mr. Foster, and Staff 

Undergraduate Division 

5. Summer Practice. No. hr. A minimum of 12 weeks on an approved farm 
will be required of each candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Agriculture who has not had the equivalent of at least one year's farm 
experience after reaching the age of 14 years. Must be done under the 
direction of the Dean and the Committee on Farm Practice and must 
be completed before the third year. Open only to students deficient in 
farm practice. 

3#0. Biometry. II. 3 hr. Statistical analysis of biological data. Mr. Foster 

21/ 
AGRICULTURAL BIOCHEMISTRY 

Professor Lewis and Associate Professor Hare 

Chemistry courses for agricultural and home economics students of undergrad- 
uate rank are offered in the College of Arts and Sciences (see Chemistry). Grad- 
uate work may be pursued under the general research course outlined under 
Agriculture, above. 

Undergraduate Division 

103. Agricultural Analysis. I. 3-5 hr. The principles of gravimetric and volumetric 
analysis, colorimetry, chromatography, bioassay and proximate analysis applied 
to the analysis of foods, feeds, and other agricultural materials. Mr. Lewis 

180, 181. Assigned Topics. I, II. 1-4 hr. per semester. Staff 

218. Dairy Chemistry. I. 3 hr. PR: organic chemistry; quantitative analysis 
desirable. Analysis of dairy products. Offered in alternate years (1954-55). 
For students in Agriculture. Mr. Hare 

220. Chemistry of Animal Nutrition. II. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 6 and 31 and Bio- 
chem. 239 or its equivalent. Proximate analysis of foods and rations. Diges- 
tion and metabolism of food nutrients. Chemical, biological, and micro- 
biological assay of vitamins. 2 lect. 2 lab. Offered in alternate years (1953-54). 

Mr. Lewis and Mr. Hare 
Graduate Division 

320, 321, 322, 323. Special Topics. I and II. 2-4 hr. (For the Master's Degree, 
Special Topics ordinarily may count 2 to 4 hours; maximum credit, 6 hours.) 

Staff 
350, 351, 352, 353. Seminar. I, II. 1 hr. Staff 



86 CURRICULA AND COURSES 






380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1-6 hr. per semester. 

NOTE: For description of the course in general biochemistry see the Announce- 
ments of the School of Medicine. 

CHEMISTRY 

31, 131. Organic Chemistry. I. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 2 For students in Agriculture and 
Home Economics. Beginning aliphatic organic chemistry and biochemistry. 
2 lect., 1 lab., and 1 quiz period weekly. Mr. Dustman 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Professors Armentrout and Nybroten; Associate Professors Clarke and Toben; 
Assistant Professor Porter. 

Undergraduate Division 

102. Agricultural Economics. I. 3 hr. Principles with application to agriculture. 

Mr. Armentrout 

104. Farm Management. I. 3 hr. PR: Agr. Econ. 102. Types and systems of farming; 
considerations in starting farming; use of records in solving farm problems; 
land tenure and leases; production for family use. Mr. Toben 

105. Sociology of Rural Life. II. 3 hr. Social aspects of rural living; char- 
acteristics of rural population, social structure, and institutional arrange- 
ments (family, community, education, religion, recreation, health, welfare, 
and local government). Mr. Porter 

¥&&. — -Valu e an t> -PrtcevH.- 3 hr. PR: Agr. Econ. 102. Nature and function of prices, 
price variation, and price-making forces in agriculture. Mr. Nybroten 

131. Marketing Agricultural Products. II. 3 hr. PR: Agr. Econ. 102. Principles and 
practices. Tour of market facilities in Pittsburgh area required. Mr. Clarke 

180, 181. Assigned Topics. I and II. 1-4 hr. per semester. Staff 

--- 

206. Farm Planning. I. 3 hr. PR: Senior standing. Principal factors influencing 
returns on farms; planning use of labor, soil, crops, livestock, buildings, and 
equipment. Farm visits required. Mr. Toben 

230. Cooperative Marketing. II. 2-3 hi. PR: Agr. Econ. 102. Principles and 
practices of cooperation as applied to marketing of agricultural products 
and to purchase of farm supplies. Mr. Clarke 

235. Marketing Dairy Products. II. 2 hi. PR: Agr. Econ. 102. Milk-marketing 
policies and practices, including federal milk-market orders. Mr. Clarke 

250. Agricultural Statistics. II. 3 hr. PR: Senior standing or consent; Sources 
and methods of collecting and analyzing; construction of statistical tables, 
charts, graphs, etc. Mr. Nybroten 

271. Agricultural Economics. Agricultural Policy II. 2 hr. Mr. Armentrout 

Graduate Division 

320, 321, 322, 323. Special Topics. I, II. S. 2-4 hr. (For the Master's Degree, 
Special Topics ordinarily may count 2 to 4 hours; maximum credit, 6 hours.) 

Staff 

340. Advanced Farm Management. I. 3 hr. PR: Ag. Econ. 206. Mr. Toben 

341. Production Economics. I. 3 hr. Economic principles of production with 
special application to agriculture. Mr. Nybroten 

342. Advanced Agricultural Economics. II. 3 hr. Mr. Armentrout 
380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1-6 hr. per semester. Staff 






THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 87 









AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Lonchouse; Assistant Professors Brown and Emerson; Instructor Reid. 

Undergraduate Division 

100. Farm Structures. II. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 122. Structural design and functional 
requirements of farm service buildings. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Longhouse 

1 10. Application of Electricity to Agriculture. II. 2 hr. PR. E.E. 103. Economic 
application of electric light, heat, and power. 1 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Reid 

140. Soil and Water Conservation. I. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 115. Engineering principles 
and practices in conservation, utilization, and management of soil and water 
resources. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Reid 

190. Farm Machinery. II. 3 hr. PR: ME. 203. Construction, operation, adjust- 
ment, and testing of farm machines. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Reid 

230. Farm Power. I. 4 hr. PR: M.E. 222. Not open to students who have had M.E. 
229. Fundamental theories underlying design and operation of internal- 
combustion engines used in agriculture. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Longhouse 

Graduate Division 

320, 321. Special Topics. I, II. S. 1-6 hr. (For the Master's Degree, Special Topics 
ordinarily may count 2 to 4 hours; maximum crdeit, 6 hours.) Staff 

397. Research. I and II. 1-6 hr. Staff 

AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS 

Undergraduate Division 
20. Elementary Farm Shop. I. 2 hr. Mr. Emerson 

113. Farm Refrigeration. II. f-3 hr. General course for agricultural students in 
farm refrigeration: different types of refrigeration systems, refrigeration plants, 
cold storage, food preservation, and storage-house construction. 2 hr. rec, 
3 hr. lab. Mr. Reid 

151. Mechanics of Soil and Water Conservation. I. 3 hr. Planning and installation 
of farm land drainage, contour strip cropping, terracing, and farm ponds. 
2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Reid 

152. Farm Shop. I. 3 hrs. Place of farm shop on farm. Construction and repair 
problems including carpentry, metal working, forging, fitting tools, repairing 
harness, and filing saws. Primarily for Vocational Agriculture Teachers. 

1 hr. rec, 6 hr. lab. Mr. Emerson 

153. Farm Machinery. II. 3 hr. Principles underlying construction, adjustment, 
care, use, and repair of farm machinery. Tillage, harvesting, and seeding 
machinery. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Reid 

155. Household Equipment. II. 2 hr. Planned to help students understand 
mechanical equipment in home and its effective use. 1 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

Staff 

159. Farm Structures. II. 3 hr. Fundamental principles of farmbuilding construc- 
tion. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Longhouse 

170. Rural Electrification. II. 3 hr. Fundamentals of electricity and its applica- 
tion in home and on farm. Open to Agriculture students only or by consent. 

2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Reid 

175. Farm Gas Engines and Tractors. I. 3 hr. General course for agricultural 
students in care, operation, and maintenance of farm gas engines and tractors. 
2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Longhouse 



88 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



180, 181. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per semester. Staff 

200. Rural Water Supply and Sanitation. II. 2 hr. PR: A.M. 170. Mr. Emerson 

252. Advanced Farm Mechanics. II. 3 hr. PR: Ag. M. 152. Forging, cold-iron work, 
toolfitting, woodworking; offers training for teaching shopwork in rural high 
schools. Mr. Emerson 

253. Advanced Farm Machinery. II. 3 hr. PR: Ag. M. 153. Trends and economic 
use of farm machinery. Primarily for graduate vocational agriculture 
teachers. Open to Agriculture students only or by consent. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. 
lab. Mr. Reid 

254. Farm Maintenance and Construction Welding. II. 3 hr. PR: Ag. Mech. 153. 
Characteristics and properties of metals used in farm machinery and equipment. 
Machinery repair including oxacetylene cutting and welding, AC and DC 
electric. 1 hr. lee, 2 three-hour labs. Mr. Emerson 

255. Care and Repair of Home Equipment. II. 2 hr. For advanced undergraduate 
and graduate students. Construction, maintenance, and repair of household 
equipment. Their comparative cost and economic use. 1 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

Staff 
259. Functional Requirements of Farm Buildings. I. 3 hr. PR: Ag. M. 159 or 
consent. Special problems re livestock and storages. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

Mr. Longhouse 

270. Electricity in Agriculture. I. 3 hr. PR: Ag M. 170 or consent. 2 hr. rec, 

3 hr. lab. Mr. Reid 

Graduate Division 

320, 321, 322, 323. Special Topics. I, II. S. 2-4 hr. (For the Master's Degree, 
Special Topics ordinarily may count 2 to 4 hours; maximum credit, 6 hours.) 

Staff 
380, 381. Research. I and II. 1-6 hr. per semester. Staff 

AGRONOMY AND GENETICS 

Professors Pohlman, Galpin; Associate Professor Veatch; Assistant Professors Burger, 
Fairchild, Haltiwanger, and Ray; Instructors Little and Sperow. 

AGRONOMY 

Undergraduate Division 

1. Farm Crops. I. 4 hr. PR: Botany 2 or Biology 2. Cereal, forage, and pasture 
crops. Mr. Haltiwanger 

2. Soils. II. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 2. The properties of soils. Mr. Pohlman 

10. Forest Soils. I. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 2. Properties of soils in relation to forestry. 

Mr. Pohlman 
124. Climatology and Hydrology. II. 3 hr. Mr. Galpin and Staff 

180, 181. Assigned Topics. I, II. 1-4 hr. per semester. Staff 

205. Soil Conservation. II. 3 hr. PR: Agron. 2 or 10. Causes of soil erosion and 
methods for its control. One or two half-day field trips will be made during 
the semester. Mr. Fairchild 

210. Fertilizers and Soil Fertility. I. 3 hr. PR: Agron. 2 or 10. Soil fertility; 
theories and practices in use of fertilizer. Mr. Pohlman 

215. Development and Classification of Soils. II. 3 hr. PR: Agron. 2 or 10. 

Morphology, genesis and classification of soils. Soil survey methods, mapping 

of an assigned area, and characterictics of some important soil series of 

West Virginia and the United States. Mr. Fairchild 



THK COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 89 



230. Soil Physics. I. 3 hr, PR: Agron. 2. Physical Properties of soils in relation 
to crop growth, water movement, and soil erosion control. Offered in 1953-54 
and in alternate years. Mr. Fairchild 

231. Soil Analysis. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Agron. 2 and Chem. 6 or 15. Theory and 
practice in physical, chemical, and biological methods used in soil analysis. 

Mr. Fairchild 

251. Weed Control. I. 2 hr. PR: Agron. 1 and 2. Identification and control meas- 
ures for common weeds. Mr. Veatch 

252. Grain and Special Crops. II. 3 hr. PR: Agron. 1 and 2. Advanced study of 
methods in the production of grain and special crops. Varieties, improvement, 
tillage, harvesting, storage and uses of crops grown for seed or special pur- 
poses. Mr. Veatch 

254. Pasture and Forage Crops. II. 4 hr. PR: Agron. 1 and 2. All phases of pas- 
ture and forage crop production, including identification, seeding, manage- 
ment, use, seed production and storage of forage crops. Mr. Burger 

Graduate Division 

316. Soil Chemistry. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Fundamental chemical properties 
of soils in relation to plant growth; nature and properties of soil colloids;* 
base exchange and soil acidity; availablity of plant food elements and soil- 
plant interrelationships. Offered in 1954-55 and in alternate years. 

Mr. Fairchild 

320, 321, 322, 323. Special Topics. I, II. S. 2-4 hr. (For the Master's Degree, 
Special Topics ordinarily may count 2 to 4 hours; maximum credit, 6 hours.) 

Staff 

350, 351, 352, 353. Seminar. I and II. 1 hr. per semester. Recent literature per- 
taining to soil and crop production. Staff 

380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1-6 hr. per semester. Staff 

BACTERIOLOGY 

314. Soil Microbiology. II. 3 hr. PR: Agron. 2 and Bact. 141. Occurrence of 
micro-organisms in soils and their relationship to decomposition of organic 
matter, availability of plant nutrients, and soil acidity; technique of isolation 
and study. Mr. Wilson 

GENETICS 

Undergraduate Division 

111. Elementary Genetics. I, II. 2 hr. PR: 6 hours of biological science. Element- 
ary study of the principles of heredity. Mr. Ray 

112. Genetics Laboratory. I, II. 1 hr. Breeding experiments. Mr. Ray 
180, 181. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. pei semester. Staff 

220. Crop Breeding. II. 3 hr. PR: Gen. Ill or 221. Methods and basic scien- 
tific principles involved in the improvement of leading cereal and forage 
crops through hybridization and selection. Mr. Veatch 

221. Genetics. I. 3 hr. PR: 8 hours in biological science. Fundamental principles 
of inheritance. Mr. Rav 

222. Advanced Genetics. II. 3 hr. PR: Genetics 111 or 221, and consent. Mr. Ray 

224. Human Genetics. II. 2 hr. PR: Genetics 111 or 221. A study of inheritance 
in man. Mr. Ray 



90 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Graduate Division 






320, 321, 322, 323. Special Topics. I, II. S. 2-4 hr. (For [he Master's Degree, 
Special Topics ordinarily may count 2 to 4 hours; maximum credit, 6 hours.) 

Staff 

350, 351, 352, 353. Seminar. I. and II. 1 hr. per semester. Recent literature per- 
taining to breeding, genetics, and cytology. Staff 

380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1-6 hr. per semester. Staff 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Professors Livesay and Olson; Associate Professors Anderson, Black, Clark and Hyre; 
Assistant Professors Bletner, Johnson, Munro, and Welch. 

Undergraduate Division 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

11. Types, Breeds, and Market Classes.* I. 3 lit. (1 Jab.) Mr. Welch 

101. Animal Nutrition.* 3 hr. PR: Chem. 31 or 233. Digestion and metabolism 
of food nutrients, nutrient requirements of farm animals, and nutritive 

values of feeds and rations. Mr. Anderson 

> 
138. Grading and Selection. II. 2 hr. (2 labs.) Mr. Black 

141. Beef Production. I. 3 hr. (1 lab.) Mr. Livesay 

142. Pork Production. II. 3 hr. (1 lab.) Mr. Black 

143. Advanced Judging. I. 2 hr. (2 labs.) Students taking this course will be re- 
quired to participate in a tour of inspection of representative flocks and herds. 

Mr. Black 
162. Mutton- and Wool Production. II. 3 hr. (1 lab.) Mr. Welch 

143, — Horse Production. I or II. 2 hr. (1 lab.) Emphasis on light-horse pro- 
duction, training, and use of horses for pleasure. Mr. Livesay 

166. Meats. II. 2 hr. Lectures and demonstrations in identification, selection, and 
nutritive value of meat cuts. Primarily for home economics students. 

Mr. Johnson 

167. Meats. 1. 3 hr. (2 labs.) Farm butchering, curing, and care of meats. Visit 
to one of large packing houses of Pittsburgh required. Mr. Johnson 

169. Meat Judging. I. 2 hr. Tour of representative packing plants required. 

Mr. Johnson 
180, 181. Assigned Topics. I, II. 1-4 hr. per semester. Staff 

202. Advanced Meats. II. 2 hr. (2 labs.) PR: A. H. 167. Studies covering complete 
correlation of animal types, quality and finish as against carcass yields, per- 
centage, cuts, etc. Mr. Johnson 



203. Advanced Animal Nutrition. II. 3 hr. PR: A.H. 11, 101, and Chem. 31 or 233. 
Chemistry of feeding stuffs and of animal body, as well as of digestion and 






3 - metabolism of food nutrients. Mr. Anderson 

222. Breeding Farm Animals. II. 3 hr. PR: A. H. 11. 101, and Gen. Ill or 221. 
Physiology of reproduction; inheritance; selection, care, and management of 
breeding animals. Mr. Livesay 

223. Advanced Livestock Production. I. 3 hr. (1 lab.) PR: A. H. 11, 101, and 141. 
Phases of beef production involving problem work in specialized commercial 
and purebred fields, including processing. Mr. Livesay 

♦Animal Husbandry 11 and 101 are prerequisite to all other courses in animal hus- 
bandry and animal pathology. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 91 



224. Advanced Livestock Production. II. 3 hr. (1 lab.) PR: A. H. 11, 101, and 162. 
Special studies in wool and market-lamb production, including processing. 

Mr. Welch 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

1. Poultry Production. II. 4 hr. (1 lab.) Prerequisite to all other poultry courses. 

Messrs. Hyre and Bletner 

103. Poultry Feeding and Management. I. 3 hr. Factors in poultry production, 

feeding, and management as related to scientific investigations. Mr. Bletner 

105. Poultry Judging. I. 2 hr. (2 labs.) Practice in selection of birds for both 
standard and production qualities. Mr. Hyre 

106. Preparation and Grading of Eggs and Poultry for Market. I. 2 hr. 
(1 lab.) Latest methods in killing, dressing, and grading of poultry. Grading, 

storing, and processing eggs for market. (Offered in alternate years beginning 
in 1951-52.) Messrs. Hyre and Clark 

108, 109, 110. Poultry Plant Experience. I, II. S. 1 hr. (3 hr. lab.) Experience 
tin operating a poultry breeding farm, including feeding, trapnesting. incuba- 
tion, and pedigreeing. A report will be required. Mr. Clark 

111. Hatchery Management. II. 2 hr. (1 lab.) Problems involved in operating a 
hatchery. Mr. Bletner 

180, 181. Assigned Topics I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per semester. Staff 



201. 



Advanced Poultry Production. I. 3 <m*t+*. PR: Senior standing or consent. 
Special phases of broiler and egg production, disease control, labor saving 
studies, recent designs in buildings and heating equipment. 

Mr. Bletner and Staff 

211. Poultry Breeding. I. 2 hr. PR: Poultry 1 and Gen. Ill or 221. Fundamental 

principles and practices of breeding and selecting poultry; inheritance of 

factors that influence production of poultry, meat and eggs. Mr. Hyre 

213. Turkey Production. I. 3 hr. (1 lab.) PR: Poultry 1 or equivalent for all stu- 
dents. For graduate credit: Poultry 103, or consent. Current methods of 
turkey production, including varieties, selective breeding, nutrition, and 
marketing. Messrs. Clark and Bletner 

ANIMAL PATHOLOGY 

102. Animal Pathology. I. 3 hr. PR: Biology 1 or Zoology 3 and Bacteriology 141. 
Diseases of domestic animals, with especial emphasis on common diseases. 

Mr. Munro 

206. Parasites and Pathology. II. 3 hr. PR: Animal Pathology 102; for nonagricul- 
tural students, consent. Common parasites of farm animals and their effect 
upon host. Mr. Olson 

NOTE: Students assigned to a 200 course for graduate credit will be required 
f o prepare a semester paper on some special phase of the course in addition to 
the regular course work. 

Graduate Division — Animal Husbandry — Poultry Husbandry 

320. 321, 322, 323. Special Topics. I, II, S. 2-#«hr. Advanced studies in various 
phases of animal husbandry or poultry husbandry; animal genetics; energy 
metabolism; protein metabolism: vitamin studies; parasitology; meats; pedigrees. 
(For the Master's Degree, Special Topics ordinarily may count for 2 to 4 
hours; maximum credit, 6 hours.) 

350, 351, 352, 353. Sfminar. I, II. 1 hr. Animal, Poultry, and Dairy Husbandry staffs. 



92 CI RRICII \ AND COURSES 









370. Methods of Animal Research. I or II. 3 hi. (Animal and Dairy Husbandry 
Departments.) PR: A.H. 101, Chem. 31 or 233. Oen. 11 1 or 221. Research 
methods used in conducting experimental work in animal science. 

Mr. Anderson 

380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1-6 hr. per semester. Staff 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Professor Henderson; Associate Professors Weese, Dunbar, and Porterfield; Assistant 
Professor Ackerman; Instructor Fike. 

Undergraduate Division 

11. Dairy Production. I. 3 hr. Introductory. Breeds of dairy cattle, their selection, 
feeding, and management. Mr. Henderson and Mr. Ackerman 

12. Farm Dairying. II. 3 hr. Introductory. Composition and properties of milk 
and milk products; butterfat testing; manufacture of dairy products. 

Mr. Weese and Mr. Fike 

102. Ice Cream and Refrigeration. I. 3 hr. Offered in 1954-55 and alternate 
years. Manufacture of ice cream; principles of refrigeration involved in the 
manufacture and storage of dairy products. Mr. Weese 

103. Market Milk. I. 3 hr. Offered in 1953-54 and alternate years. Market milk 
and the manufacture of dry and condensed milk. Mr. Weese 

104. Butter and Cheese. II. 3 hr. Offered in 1953-54 and alternate years. Manu- 
facture of butter and various types of cheese. Mr. Weese 

107. Milk and Public Health. I. 2-3 hr. Food value of milk and its production 
and processing in relation to public health. Mr. Fike 

123. Dairy Judoino. II. 4-2 — hr. Judging of dairy cattle and dairy products. 
Required of all members of dairy-cattle or dairy-products judging teams. 

Mr. Porterfield and Mr. Weese 

180, 181. Assigned Topics 1. and II. 1-4 hr. per semester. For advanced dairy 

students who desire to pursue study along some particular phase of dairying. 

Staff 

204. Dairy Technology. II. 4 hr. Chemical and bacteriology methods used u. 

the technical control of milk and milk products. Mr. Fike 

221. Dairy Cattle. I. 3 hr. History of breeds and families of registered dairy 
cattle. Organization and activities of breeding associations. Mr. Porterfield 

222. Milk Production. II. 4 hr. Feeding and management of dairy cattle. 

Mr. Henderson 

223. Breeding of Dairy Animals. II. 3 hr. PR: Oenetics 111 or 221. Measuring 
genetics and environmental variation. Study of methods available for improv- 
ing the heredity of farm animals. Mr. Dunbar 

Graduate Division 

320, 321, 322, 323. Special Topics. I, II, S. 2-4 hr. Advanced study in such 
topics as vitamins, minerals, and infernal secretions in relation to health, 
milk production, reproduction, and newer studies in the field of animal 
nutrition and breeding. (For the Master's Degree, Special Topics ordinarily 
may count for 2 to 4 hours; maximum credit, 6 hours.) Staff 

350, 351, 352, 353 Seminar. I, II. 1 hr. Dairy and Animal Husbandry. Staffs 

370. Methods of Animal Research. , (With Animal Husbandry.) I, II, S. Research 

methods used in animal nutrition and breeding. Mr. Anderson and Mr. Dunbar 

380, 381, 382. 383. Research. I and II. 1-6 hr. per semester. For graduate stu- 
dents working on a problem for preparation of a thesis. Staff 






■M 






THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 93 



* 



BACTERIOLOGY 
246. Dairy Bacteriology. II. 3 hr. See under 'Bacteriology," page 94. 

CHEMISTRY 

218. Dairy Chemistry. I. 3 hr. See under "Biochemistry," page 85. 

HORTICULTURE 

Professors Marsh and Westover; Associate Professor Childs; Assistant Professors 
Dye, Neal, Pease and Schubert; Instructors Lees and Marvel. 

Undergraduate Division /, 

-h — PKii f c i PtLS ut- HumiLUH ' UR Er II. 4 hr. Vegetable gardening. Prerequisite to 
all courses in olericulture. Mr. Westover and Mr. Marvel 

104. Plant Propagation. II. 3 hr. Plant propagation and nursery practice. 

Mr. Neal and Mr. Lees 

102. Princi ples' OF H6rtic.it h'ke. 1. 4 hr. Basic horticulture, fruit production, 

and ornamental horticulture. PR to all courses in pomology. Mr. Childs 

3. PiUi]icigLEiM . sor Horticulture. I. 3 hr. Basic horticulture, fruit production, 
vegetable production, and ornamental horticulture. Primarily for any student 
in the University who is not majoring in Horticulture or Agronomy. Three 
lecture hours per week, with demonstrations and no lab. Mr. Schubert 

106. - Acelicat-iqm or Spravs, Dusts, and Fumigants. II. 2 hr. PR: Ent. 102, Plant 
Path. 103. One lect. and one lab. Training in use of machinery and materials 
in application of fungicides, insecticides, herbicides, hormones and plant 
nutrients of horticultural crops. Mr. Schubert and Mr. Marsh 

115. Judging and Identification of Apple Varieties. I. 1 hr. Two laboratory 
periods first half of semester. Mr. Childs 

116. Flower Judging. II. 1 hr. One laboratory period per week. Mr. Dye 

117. Vegetable Identification and Judging. I. 1 hr. PR: Hort. 1 or permission. 
Identification and judging of the common vegetables. Laboratory course. 

3^ Mr. Marvel 

jA'J E3§. Landscape Design. I. 3-$*8». Principles of landscape design with special applic- 
ation to home grounds. Mr. Lees 

/ 140. Plant Materials. II. 3 hr. Important woody and herbaceous plants used 
in landscape gardening. Mr. Neal 

141. Greenhouse Management. II. 3 hr. A practical studv of greenhouse operations. 

/ /SO* HZR6A r\ATEtfltL5 K 7Z~ 3h ' Mr. Dye 

180, 181. Assigned Topics. I and II. 1-4 hr. per semester. Staff 

206. Small- Fruits Production. I. 3 hr. A practical and scientific study of standard 
cultural practices in the small-fruits plantation. Mr. Childs 

212. Commercial Tree-Fruit Production. II. 3 hr. Latest methods in pruning, 
spraying, soil culture, and other production practices for fruit trees from 
the practical and scientific standpoint. Mr. Schubert 

H arve s ting, Packing, P rocfssing, and Storage of Fructs. I. 3 hr. Instruction 
in maturity standards for harvesting, grading according to national and state 
standards, planning and management of packing houses and storages, and 

processing. . Mr. Marsh and Mr. Pease 

232. Commercial Vegetable Production. II 3 hr. Current methods of commercial 
vegetable crop production, including equipment, soil\nd climatic adaptation, 
plant raising, soil culture, harvesting, grading, and packing. Mr. Westover 



213 




*% 



94 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



233 Systematic Olericulture. I. 3 hr. History, botany, and classification of 
vegetable crops. Offered in alternate years, 1954-56. j~- Mr. Westover 

238. Planting Design. II. 3 hr. PR: Hort. 139 or permission. The use of orna- 
mental plants in landscape design Mr. Lees 

239. Advanced Landscape Design. I. 4 hr. PR: Hort. 139 or permission. A continua- 
tion of Hort. 139; to include home grounds and recreational areas. Mr. Lees 

Graduate Division 

320, 321, 322, 323. Special Topics. I, II. S. 2-4 hr. (For the Master's Degree, 
Special Topics ordinarily may count for 2 to 4 hours: maximum credit, 6 
hours.) Staff 

380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I and II. 1-6 hr. per semester. Staff 

PLANT PATHOLOGY, BACTERIOLOGY, AND ENTOMOLOGY 

Professors Leach, Barnett, Dorsey, Lilly, and Orion; Asxxiate Professors True and 
Wilson; Assistant Professor Gallegly. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Undergraduate Division 

141. General Bacteriology. I, II, S. 4 hr. (3 hr. for engineering students.) 
PR: Chem. 1 and 2. Introductory, morphological, cultural and physiological 
characteristics of bacteria, and application of bacteriology to agriculture, home 
economics, sanitation, and health. Mr. Wilson 

180, 181. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per semester. Mr. Wilson 

246. Dairy Bacteriology. I. 4 hr. PR: Bact. 141. Microorganisms in market milk, 
in manufacture of butter, cheese, and fermented milk, and in milk hvgiene; 
practice in preparation of media; making bacterial counts in milk. Offered 
in 1954-55 and alternate years. Staff 

248. Sanitary Bacteriology. I. 3 hr. PR: Bact. 141. Standard bacteriological 
methods used in routine examination of water and sewage. Offered in 1953-54 
and alternate years. Mr. Wilson 

Graduate Division 

314. Soil Microbiology. II. 4 hr. PR: Bact. 141 and organic chemistry. Occur- 
rence and distribution of microorganisms in soils and their inter-relationships. 
Their role in decomposition of organic matter and other transformations 
of soil constituents. Mr. Wilson 

320, 321, 322, 323. Special Topics. 1, II. S. 2-4 hr. (For the Master's Degree, 
Special Topics ordinarily may count for 2 to 4 hours; maximum credit, 6 
hours.) Staff 

380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I, II, S. 1-6 hr. per semester. Mr. Wilson 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Undergraduate Division 

102./\ Entomology. II. 4 hr. PR: Invertebrate zoology. Biological, morphological, 
taxonomic, economic phases of the study of insects. Mr. Dorsey 

103. Economic Entomology. II. 3 hr. PR: Ent. 102 or equivalent. Standard practices 
in insect control; methods for study of injurious insects. Professional require- 
ments in entomology. Mr. Dorsey 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 95 






152. Forest Entomolocy. I. 4 hr. Insects of importance to the forest; recognition 
and control of insect pests in the forest. Mr. Dorsev 

180, 181. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per semester. Advanced studies in the 
field of interest of the student. The following are available: life history 
studies; response of insects to climatic variables; insect toxicology; injurious 
insects. . Staff 

4 

201. Survey of Applied Entomology. I. ■&§ hr. Prerequisite for graduate credit: 20 
hours in the field of biology. Not open to students who have credit in Ent. 102. 
Principles underlying the control of insects: cultural, biological, and chemical. 
Practice in biological and control investigations. Mr Dorsey 

204, 205r Taxonomy. I, II, S. 2-3 hr. per semester. Studies in the families and 
genera of insects of the region; derailed studies- in restricted groups for 
q+ta4ified students Mr. Dorsey 

- Bicti owics :£ * A ^ 

Graduate Division 

320, 321, 322, 323. Special Topics. I, II, S. 2-4 hr. (For the Master's Degree. Spe- 
cial Topics ordinarily may count for 2 to 4 hours; maximum credit, 6 hours) . 
h'\£-Ti>6DS i- TBCHNIQ L I'M KL Staff 

370. Methods of Entomological Re s earch . I, II. 3 hr. A study of methods 
which have been proposed and used for the solution of problems arising 
in the study of insect biology. Staff 



380, 381, 382, 383. Research. I, II. 1-6 hr. per semester. Staff 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

Undergraduate Division , ,, 

PfiQfrU<lE_ °Z /: ' 

103. Elementary Plant Pathology. I. 4 hr. PR: Botany 5 and Bact. 141. Nature 

and causes of plant diseases; methods of control. Mr. Leach and Mr. Gallegly 

106. Application of Sprays, Dusts, and Fumigants. II. 2 hr. PR: Hort. 1 and 102, 
Ent. 102, Plant Path. 103, Agron. 1. One lecture and one lab. Training in use 
of machinery and materials in application of fungicides, insecticides, herbicides, 
hormones, and plant nutrients of horticultural crops. Same as Hort. 106. 

Mr. Marsh 

153. Forest Pathology. II. 4 hr. PR: Biology 2 or Botany 2. Important diseases 
of forest and shade trees; causes and methods of control. Mr. True 

180. 181. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per semester. Staff 

202. General Plant Pathology. II. 4 hr. PR: Bact. 141 and either Plant Path. 
103, 153, or 203 or consent. Primarily for graduate students and qualified 
seniors majoring in botany, biology, or agricultural science. Nature of 
diseases in plants with practice in laboratory methods. 

Mr. Leach, Mr. Gallegly and Staff 

203. Mycology. I. 4 hr. Lectures, field and laboratory studies of parasitic and 
saprophytic fungi. Mr. Barnett 

204. Diseases of Fruit Crops. II. 3 hr. PR: Plant Path. 103. The important 
diseases of commercial fruits; causes and methods of control. Offered in 1954-55 
and alternate years. 

205. Diseases of Ornamentals. II. 3 hr. PR: Plant Path. 103 or 153. The im- 
portant diseases of ornamentals; causes and methods of control. Offered in 
1953-54 and alternate years. Mr. True 



206. 



Diseases of Vegetable Crops. I. 3 hr. PR: Plant Path. 103. The important 
diseases of potatoes and vegetable crops; causes and methods of control. 
Offered in 1953-54 and alternate years. Mr. Gallegly 

I 

I 






96 CURRICULA AND COURSES 






Graduate Division 

312. Pathological Anatomy. I. 3 hr. Abnormal tissue changes in plants. PR: 
Plant Path. 103, 153, or Botany 213. Offered in 1954-55 and alternate years. 

Mr. Orton 

313. Insect Transmission of Plant Diseases. I. 3 hr. PR: Plant Path. 103, 153, 
or Ent. 102. Role of insects in spread and development of plant diseases. 
Offered in 1953-54 and alternate years. Mr. Leach 

320, 321, 322, 323. Special Topics. I, II. S. 2-4 hr. (For the Master's Degree. 
Special Topics ordinarily may count for 2 to 4 hours; maximum credit, 6 
hours.) Staff 

330. Physiology of the Fungi. II. 4 hr. PR: Organic chemistry, mycology, and 
bacteriology, or consent of instructor. Physiological aspects of growth, re- 
production, and parasitism of fungi, with emphasis on nutrition, environ- 
ment, and other biotic factors. Mr. Barnett and Mr. Lillv 

340. Taxonomy of the Fungi. S. 2 hr. PR: Plant Path. 203. Collection and 
identification of fungi, with emphasis upon those of economic importance. 
3S ^^353 Mr. Barnett 

350, 351,; Seminar. I, II. 1 hr. per semester. Mr. Leach and Staff 

380, 381, 382, 383. Rfsearch. I. II. S. 1-6 hr. Staff 

AGKicult l educat ion 

RURAL ORGANIZATION 

Professor Hill; Associate Professor Butler; Assistant Professor Bail; Lecturer 
Anderson. 

Undergraduate Division 

118. Organizations and Clubs for Farm Boys. II. 2 hr. Problems involved in 
directing the activities of F.F.A., and similar organizations. Mr. Bail 

134. Methods of Agricultural Extension. I. 2 hr. Activities of the county agri 
cultural and home demonstration agents and of the agricultural extension 
program of West Virginia. Mr. Anderson 

138. Theory and Practice of Agricultural Extension Work. II. 2 hr. Methods 
used in Extension work and their underlying principles Mr. Anderson 

160. Education— Materials and Methods of High-school Teaching of Vocation- 
al Agriculture. I, II. 3 hr. Organization and preparation for teaching voc- 
ational agriculture in the high school. 1 lab. Mr. Hill or Mr. Butler 

180, 181. Assigned Topics. 1, II. 1 hr. 1-4 hi. per semester. PR: Adequate ability 
and training for the work proposed and permission to register. Staff 

Ed. 124. Student Teaching in Vocational Agriculture. I, II. 4 hr. 

Mr. Hill or Mr. Butler 

Ed. 276. Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Classes. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 105 and 
106. Participation in conducting young and adult farmer classes and school- 
community food preservation center; organization, course of study, methods of 
teaching and supervision and young farmer association. Mr. Hill or Mr. Butler 

Ed. 277. Organizing and Directing Supervised Farminc Programs. I, S. 2 hr. PR: 
Ed. 160 or consent. Planning programs of supervised farming, supervising and 
evaluating such programs for all-day students, young farmers and adult farm- 
ers. Mr. Hill or Mr. Butler 

Ed. 278. Planning Programs and Courses for Vocational Agriculture Depart- 
ments. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 160 and 124. Gathering data, studying the farming 
problems of all-day students, young farmers, adult farmers, and planning the 
total program for the department. Mr. Hill or Mr. Butler 






THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Graduate Division J J\A , 

320, 321, 322, 323. Special Topics. I, II. S. 2 i hr . (For the Master's Degree, 
Special Topics ordinarily may count for 2 to 4 hours: maximum credit, 6 
hours.) Staff 

350, 351, 352, 353. Seminar. I, II, S. 1 hr. Staff 

380, 381. Research. I and II. 1-6 hr. per semester. Staff 



The Division of Forestry 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

THE DIVISION OF FORESTRY 

In its Division of Forestry, West Virginia University offers three four-year curricula, 
all leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry. A student may major in 
forest management, wildlife management, or forest utilization. 

The field of forestry is a broad one. Those who enter it must receive an education 
of a breadth equal to that of the profession which they expect to make their life work. 
The professional forester's work includes such diversified activities as timber produc- 
tion, logging, surveying, timber estimating, park management, forest protection, forest- 
stand improvement, flood control, watershed protection, soil erosion control, sub- 
marginal land development, restoration of game, forest-range management, stream 
development, lumber dry-kiln operation, plywood and furniture manufacture, timber 
preservation, and construction of public camps and suinmei home sites. The wide 
scope of the modern field of forestry demands a thorough basic training for the 
professional forester. This accounts for the large number of required courses in the 
professional forestry curricula. If a forester wishes to specialize in any one branch of 
the field, graduate work is needed. 

Regardless of the major selected, the curricula include a two years' broad 
foundational study of the natural and social sciences basic to the field of forestry, 
followed in the junior and senior years by a more detailed study of forestry principles 
and techniques. Many of the courses in the curricula provide for field laboratories, 
enabling the student to see first-hand applications of the principles presented in the 
classroom and to experiment with the various techniques he is learning. 

In addition to the forest work which forms a part of the regular courses at 
Morgantown and the Forestry Camp described on pages 5-0, the student is expected to 
devote the summer after his junior year to employment with a forest-using agency or 
private industry. This gives him further experience which is valuable in connection 
with his fourth-year studies, as well as in obtaining permanent employment after 
graduation. 

Opportunities for junior employment may be found with the State Conservation 
Commission, the U. S. Forest Service, the Soil Conservation Service, the U. S. Park 
Service, and with the private forest industries. The remuneration for such temporary 
undergraduate employment varies from about $125 to $225 per month. 

Facilities for Instruction 

The Division of Forestry of West Virginia University is one of twenty-five forestry 
schools in the country which are fully accredited by the Society of American Foresters. 
Situated in Morgantown, it is favorably located in relation to forests available for 
educational and research use. Coopers Rock State Forest, an area of 13,000 acres 
fronting on Cheat Lake, is less than ten miles from the institution. Bv agreement 
between the University and the Conservation Commission of West Virginia an 8,000 
acre part of this forest has been set aside as the West Virginia University Forest, 



98 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Division of the Cooper's Rock State Forest. This area is managed by the Division 
of Forestry for research and educational purposes. The Monongahela National 
Forest lies within forty-five miles of Morgantown. The University Farm Forest of 
100 acres bearing mature timber is within two miles. Recent acquisition by the 
University of the 500-acre I \ gait Valley Forest at Dailey has increased the educa- 
tional and research facilities of the Division. Several privately owned forests, including 
from 100 to 3,000 acres each, have been made available for educational and experi- 
mental use. These tracts are within short riding distance on hard-surface roads, thus 
allowing students to do work under practical conditions throughout their four years 
of training. 

During 1951, an agreement was completed between West Virginia University and 
the Island Creek Coal Company making the 3,000-acre Island Creek Experimental 
Forest available for research in applied forestry. The Division of Forestry maintains 
a resident forester at Holden who is in charge of the research forest in nearby Mingo 
County. Methods of forest production on a commercial basis and suited to the 
forest types and topography of southern West Virginia are being studied. The 
experimental work is open to inspection by forestry students. 

A lumber dry kiln, portable sawmill, and experimental wood treating plant have 
recently been acquired by the Division of Forestry. 

The dry kiln is of compartment type, cross circulating, steam heated, with 
automatic self-recording temperature and humidity controls. It has a capacity of 
approximately five thousnad board feet of lumber per charge and provides properlv 
kiln dried lumber for University use. It provides for student experience in dry kiln 
operation. 

The portable sawmill is of standard type that may be adapted to permanent, 
portable, or mobile use. It is powered by a 75-horsepower, diesel, power plant. A 
truck-tractor and semi-trailer are used in transporting the mill or hauling logs and 
lumber. The unit is used for training in mill installation, adjustment, and operation. 
Students participate in logging and sawmilling operations conducted under conditions 
similar to ordinary small industrial operations. 

The experimental wood treating plant is outstanding in its facilities for duplicat- 
ing any of the commercial methods of pressure treating wood. A recording instrument 
keeps a time, pressure, vacuum, temperature record of each treating operation. In 
addition, indicating vacuum pressure and temperature gauges are installed, including 
a mercury vacuum gauge. The equipment was designed especially for West Virginia 
Universitv to be used in laboratory instruction and research. 

The facilities of the Division of Forestry also include a wood working shop, ply- 
wood testing machine, and experimental plywood hot presses. A complete collection 
of samples of the commercial woods of the United States is maintained for study. 
The wood technology laboratory is equipped with microscopes, a microtome for 
preparing wood sections used in identifications, wood moisture meters, and a portable 
precision potentiometer. An experimental electrically heated condenser type dry 
kiln with automatic temperature and humidity controls is used for practice in addition 
to the five thousand-board foot capacity steam heated dry kiln. The forestry library 
is for the use of students and contains over five hundred books related to forestry, a 
(omplete collection of publications by the Forest Products Laboratory, publications 
of the Department of Agriculture and the State Experiment Stations. The facilities 
of the library are constantly being enlarged. 

The West Virginia University Forestry Club 

Regardless of what branch of forestry the student enters after graduation, he finds 
it necessary to direct the work of crews of skilled and semi-skilled men. The ability 
to lead men in effective work is, therefore, of first importance to the forester. Leader- 
ship training is provided through the Forestry Club (W.V.U. Foresters) . This organi- 
zation, although completely managed and financed by the students, forms a definite 
part of every forester's work at West Virginia University. 

Each man has specific duties and responsibilities in the operation of the club. 
The results of these activities are considered together with scholastic attainments in 
the placement of graduates. 

Club activities include dinner gatherings with invited speakers, meetings where 
various phases of the forest industry are discussed, and publication of the Cruiser, 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 99 



the foresters' yearbook. The club also sponsors athletic teams which participate in 
intramural contests and offers a variety of social affairs. Annual dues are five dollars, 
payable at time of registration. 

At the time of the Foresters' Annual Banquet, an axe is awarded bv the faculty 
to the senior student who has demonstrated his proficiency as the best all-round 
forester of the club. 

In May, 1952 the Rho Chapter of Xi Sigma Pi was installed at West Virginia 
University. This national forestry honor fraternity selects its members from forestry 
students who have demonstrated their scholarship and have shown active interest 
in forestry affairs. 

Camp Wood 

The Forestry Camp, held every summer for students who have completed their 
sophomore year of the professional curricula, is situated near Alvon about 12 miles 
north of White Sulphur Springs, in Greenbrier County, on the southern end of the 
Monongahela National Forest. This location offers a great variety of forest types, 
conditions, activities, and industries. 

The instruction program provides training and practical experience in land 
surveying, timber estimating, and in specialized work which is different for each of 
the three major fields of study. Forest Management majors spend a week on a special 
silvicultural study, while the utilization majors make a study of wood industries in 
southern West Virginia. The program for these two groups culminates in a one-week 
trip into the southern pine region, where silvicultural operations and wood-using 
industries are studied. Wildlife majors spend two weeks in special fish and game 
studies under the supervision of members of the wildlife staff. 

During the summer the students carry out a small logging operation of their own 
under the supervision of experienced timber cutters and loggers. Cutting is clone on 
the Meadow Creek Management Area, an 80-acrc tract heavily stocked with mature 
mixed oak and white pine. The area has been reserved by the U. S. Forest Service 
for this puropse. Working through the District Ranger, the students purchase a small 
block of marked timber, for which they pay current stumpage prices. After rhey 
have operated the timber the students sell the logs to local sawmills. Reserach data 
is taken by the students on each cutting unit and on every tree felled. This single 
project provides practical experience in surveying, topographic mapping, timber 
estimating, timber marking, stumpage purchase, planning of logging operation, 
felling, bucking, swamping, construction of skidwavs, skidding, scaling, and sale of logs. 
Proceeds from the operation are divided equally among the students who participate. 

The main social event of the camp is its Field Day, which is held sometime during 
the last two weeks of camp. The students and their guests compete in traditional 
contests, including a softball game between the students and alumni. An exhibit of 
the work of the camp, swimming, and dinner are other features. At the 1939 
Field Day the camp was dedicated to A. A. Wood, who was at that time supervisor of 
the Monongahela National Forest. 

A principal aim of the camp is development of leadership ability. Not only are 
the party chiefs in the technical work rotated to give each man an opportunity to show 
his strength as a leader, but the camp is run by the students themselves. They elect a 
camp manager, an assistant camp manager, a steward and an assistant steward, 
treasurer, athletic director, and such other officers as are needed. The steward and his 
assistant plan all the menus and purchase all the food. Every man in camp has definite 
duties and responsibilities and has full opportunity for all-round development. 

The cost of tuition for the entire session is S30, payable to the University Comp- 
troller at time of registration. This fee covers the entire summer camp session, which is 
the equivalent of both summer terms on the campus. A ration fee of about S85 must be 
paid to the camp treasurer before the opening of camp to take care of the cost of 
rations. The exact fee will be determined by a current estimate of food costs. This 
is a cooperative fund, and any money left in the treasury at the end of camp is 
divided equallv among all persons who pav into the fund. Since food purchases are 
made bv students elected by the other campers, the amount of the rebate is actually 
determined by the students themselves. Each student is required to provide funds to 
cover the cost of his room, board, and part of the transportation on scheduled trips. 
This cost will not exceed S50 for the summer and generally is considerably less. 



100 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Publications 

In addition to numerous faculty publications, several books, magazines, and a 
newspaper are published by students. Forestry students are eligible to participate in 
these activities and in addition they publish The Cruiser, mentioned previously. 

Forestry Societies 

Although they do not form a part of the regular academic training program, 
there are at least two organizations active in forestry work in West Virginia with 
which the forester will come in contact during his undergraduate career. 

THE SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FORESTERS 

The S.A.F. is a professional society which accepts as members only those persons 
actually engaged in technical forestry work or studying in preparation for such work. 
Its objects are "to represent, advance, and protect the interests and standards of the 
profession of forestry, to provide a medium for exchange of professional thought, and 
to promote the science, practice, and standards of forestry in America." The society 
publishes the Journal of Forestry. The scope of its program and the various divisions 
within the society are of interest to all who are connected with the forestry profession. 
Junior and senior forestry students are eligible to affiliate with the society and receive 
the Journal at a special rate. Upon graduation they are encouraged to become regular 
members of the organization. 

The West Virginia Chapter of the Allegheny Section, S.A.F. , was organized in 1945 
for the purpose of unifying the professional foresters working in the state. The 
annual meeting of the chapter is so arranged that senior students who wish to do so 
may attend as a part of their school program. 

THE WEST VIRGINIA FOREST COUNCIL 

Recognizing the need for a more vigorous and comprehensive forestry program 
in a state in which two-thirds of the land is primarily suited to growing trees, 
a group of public-spirited citizens in 1947 organized the West Virginia Forest Council. 
Membership in this "Task Force For Conservation," as it was recently labeled in a 
leature article in American Forests, is open to anyone interested in better forestry for 
West Virginia. The officers and members of the board of directors are carefully chosen 
to represent all types of industries, agencies, and individuals concerned with forestry 
problems. Some of the better known activities of the council to date include sponsor- 
ing of the Tree Farm program, Arbor Day observance in the schools, Forestry Forums, 
and various other demonstrational and educational activities along conservation lines. 
Forestry students are eligible to membership in the council, and opportunities are 
offered to attend its meetings. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 



The Division of Forestry offers three curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Forestry. The first year of work is the same in all three, except that 
students majoring in forest utilization must take Mathematics 3, College Algebra, 
during the first semester, and Mathematics 4, Plane Trigonometry, during the second 
semester. In order to take Mathematics 3, the student must offer li/ 2 units of algebra 
in his entrance credits. 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester Hr. Second Semester Hr. 

Biology 1— General 4 Biology 2— General 4 

Chemistry 1— General 4 Chemistry 2— General 4 

English 1— Composition 3 English 2— Composition 3 

Forestry 1— Profession 1 Forestry 2— Profession 1 

Mathematics 2 (3) —Algebra 3 Mathematics 10 (4) —Plane Trig 3 

Mil. or Air Sci. 1 2 Mil. or Air Sci. 2 2 

Phys. Educ. 1— Service Program 1 Phys. Educ. 2— Service Program 1 

18 18 



HE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



101 



The curricula for the last three years are shown separately as follows. In each 
curriculum the student should attempt to take as many of the recommended electives 
as possible in order to obtain a complete, well-rounded course of study. 

FOREST MANAGEMENT 

The forest management curriculum offers a strong basic course in forestry leading 
particularly to the direct or indirect management of tracts of forest land. It is 
designed to train the student for a professional forestry career in either public or 
private forestry work. Graduates are equipped to hold positions with the various 
state forestry and conservation departments, the U.S. Forest Service, the Forestry 
Division of the U.S. Indian Service, the Soil Conservation Service, and other federal 
or state agencies employing professional foresters. They may also be employed by 
private forest land owners— both corporate and individual— or may enter business 
as consulting foresters. This curriculum provides a good background for graduate 
work in the field of forest management. 



SECOND YEAR 



First Semester Hr. 

Agronomy 10— Forest Soils 4 

Botany 67— Dendrology 3 

Botany 61— Systematic 2 

C. E. 5— Land Surveying 4 

Economics 1— (Ag. Ec. 102) — 

Principles 3 

English 13— Expository Writing .... 2 

Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 



Second Semester 

Botany 71— Plant Physiology . 

Botany 68— Dendrology 

C. E. 6— Topographic Mapping 

Forestry 1 1— Silvics 

Forestry 21— Mensuration .... 

Mil. or Air Sci. 4 

Elective 



Hr. 

2 
. 3 
. 2 
. 2 
. 4 
. 2 
. 1 



20 

Recommended Elective 
Forestry 170— Problems 



17 



SUMMER PRECEDING THIRD YEAR 

10 Weeks— 10 Hours Credit 

Forestry 101— Surveying Field Practice 3 

Forestry 102— Mensuration Field Practice 4 

Forestry 103— Forest Management Practices 3 

10 



THIRD YEAR 



First Semester Hr. 

Forestry 131— Wood Identification . . 3 

Forestry 151— Protection 2 

Forestry 114— Forest Economics .... 3 

Physics 1— Introductory 3 

Physics 3— Introductory Lab 1 

Electives 4 

16 
Recommended Elective 
Forestry 171— Problems 1 



■■ 












Second Semester Hr. 

Forestry 112— Silvicultural Systems .. 3 
Forestry 116— Regional Silviculture . 1 
Forestry 125-Policy & 

Administration 3 

Electives 10 



17 

Recommended Electives 

Forestry 113— Seeding & Planting ... 3 
Forestry 142— Recreational 

Development 2 

Forestry 143— Forest Range 2 

Forestry 172— Problems 1 



102 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Semester Hr 

Entomology 152— For. Entomology . . 4 

Forestry 123— Management 3 

Forestry 124— Forest Finance 3 

Forestry 134— Products 2 

Electives 6 



Second Semester Hr. 

Forestry 133— Lumbering 3 

Forestry 134— Forest Products 3 

Forestry 141— Wildlife Management . 3 
Plant Path. 153— Forest Pathology .. 4 
Electives 3 



Recommended Electives 
Forestry 135— Seasoning & 

Preservation 

Forestry 173— Problems 



18 



16 

Recommended Electives 
Forestry 122— Forest Mensuration ... 3 

Forestry 127— For. Mgmt. Plans 2 

Forestry 126— Forest Measurement 

by Aerial Photographs 2 

Forestry 137— Grading Wood 

Products 3 

Forestry 144— Forest Zoology 3 

Forestry 145— Life Histories of 

Game Animals 3 



WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

The wildlife management curriculum does not turn out finished professional 
wildlife management technicians, but is designed primarily to prepare students for 
graduate work in this field. While it does not meet the U.S. Civil Service requirements 
for the entering examination in general forestry, it does fulfill the requirements 
for the entering examinations in biology. Students who wish to do so may take the 
U.S. Civil Service examination for biologists with GS-5 rating. Students electing the 
wildlife management curriculum will satisfy the requirements for graduation by 
completing successfully 150 credit hours, including all the required courses listed 
below and as manv of the recommended electives as can be worked into the schedule 
I n additio n u> -the specifically required courses, at least fifteen semester hours in the 
biological sciences must be completed from the following approved courses. The 
courses elected should be divided approximately evenly between botany and zoology. 
The approved courses include the following: 



Botany 



Hr. 

Botany 273— Plant Physiology 4 

Botany 261-262— Advanced 

Systematic Botany 6 

Botany 221— Plant Ecology 4 

Botany 225— Experimental Ecology . . 4 

Botany 227— Geographic Botany .... 3 



Zoology 

Hr. 

Zoology 231— Comparative Anatomy . 5 

Zoology 210— Animal Behavior 3 

Zoology 221— Animal Ecology 3 

Zoology 229— Field Zoology 6 



SECOND YEAR 



First Semester Hr. 

Agronomy 10— Forest Soils 4 

Botany 67— Dendrologv 3 

Botany 61— Systematic 2 

C. E. 5— Land Surveying 4 

Economics 1— (Ag. Ec. 102) — 

Principles 3 

Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 

English 13— Expository Writing .... 2 



20 



Second Semester Hr. 

Botany 71— Plant Physiology 2 

C. E. 6— Topographic Mapping .... 2 

Botany 68— Dendrology 3 

Forestry 11— Sylvics 3 

Forestry 21— Mensuration 4 

Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 

Elective 1 



17 






Recommended Elective 
Forestry 170— Problems 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



103 



SUMMER PRECEDING THIRD YEAR 

10 Weeks-10 Hours Credit 

Forestry 101— Surveying Field Practice 3 

Forestry 102— Mensuration Field Practice 4 

Forestry 105— Land Utilization Practices 3 



10 



THIRD YEAR 



First Semester Hr. 

Entomology 152— For. Ent 4 

Forestry 131— Wood Identification .. 3 

Forestry 151— Protection 2 

Physics 1— Introductory 3 

Physics 3— Introductory Lab 1 

Electives 5 



Second Semester Hr. 

Forestry 112— Silvicultural Systems .. 3 
Forestry 125— Policy & 

Administration 3 

Electives 10 



16 



18 



Recommended Electives 

Forestry 171— Problems 

Zoology 231— Comparative Anatomy 



Recommended Electives 

Forestry 113— Seeding & Planting ... 3 

Forestry 116— Regional Silviculture . 1 
Forestry 142— Recreational 

Development 2 

Forestry 143— Forest Range 2 

Forestry 146— Ornithology 2 

Forestry 172— Problems 1 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Semester Hr. 

Forestry 114— Forest Economics .... 3 

Forestry 1 23— Management 3 

Forestry 1 34— Products 2 

Electives 9 



17 



Second Semester Hr. 

Forestry 141— Wildlife Management . 3 

Forestry 144— Forest Zoology 3 

Forestry 145— Life Histories of 

Game Animals 3 

Plant Path. 153— For. Pathology 4 

Electives 3 



Recommended Electives 
Botany 273— Plant Physiology ...... 4 

Botany 221 or 227-Plant Ecology or 

Geographic Botany 3 

Forestry 173— Problems 1 

Zoology 210 or 221 -Animal 

Behavior or Animal Ecology 3 

An. Path. 102-Animal Pathology ... 3 



16 

Recommended Electives 
Forestry 126— Forest Measurement 
by Aerial Photographs 2 



WOOD TECHNOLOGY 

The curriculum in wood technology is intended to prepare students to pursue 
graduate work in the technical phases of wood use or to enter directly into positions 
dealing with the conversions of forest crops into useful products. Such positions may 
be either governmental or industrial, with both groups further divided into various 
degrees of administrative, research, or developmental effort. Students electing to enter 
the field of wood technology should demonstrate a marked facility in mathematics, 
physics, and chemistry, since these basic sciences form the foundation for a large part 
of the knowledge involved in the properties and processing of wood. 



104 



CURRK II A AND COURSES 



SECOND YEAR 



First Semester 



Hr. 



Agronomy 10— Forest Soils 4 

Botany 67— Dendrology 3 

C. E. 5— Land Surveying 4 

Economics 1 (Ag. Ec. 102) — 

Principles 3 

Mathematics 5— Analytical Geom. . . 4 

Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 



Second Semester Hr. 

Botany 68— Dendrology 3 

Botany 71— Plant Physiology 2 

English 13 2 

Forestry 1 1— Silvics 3 

Forestry 21— Mensuration 4 

Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 



20 
Recommended Elective 
Botany 61— Systematic 2 



Recommended Elective 
Forestry 170— Problems 1 



SUMMER PRECEDING THIRD YEAR 

10 Weeks- 10 Hours Credit 

Forestry 101— Surveying Field Practice 3 

Forestry 102— Mensuration Field Practice 4 

Forestry 104— Forest Utilization Practices 3 



First Semester 

Chemistry 131— Organic 

Forestry 131— Wood Identification 

Forestry 134— Products 

Math 107— Differential Calculus . 

Physics 105— General 

Pnysics 107— General Lab 



10 

THIRD YEAR 

Hr. Second Semester Hr. 

4 Forestry 112— Silvicultural Systems .. 3 

3 Math 108-Integral Claculus 4 

2 M. E. 20— Mechanical Drawing 3 

4 Physics 106— General 4 

4 Physics 108-General Lab 1 

1 Elective 2 



Recommended Elective 
Forestry 171— Problems 



18 17 
Recommended Electives 

Chemistry 106— Quantitative Analysis 4 
1 Forestry 125— Policy and 

Administrat ion 3 

Forestry 172— Problems 1 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Semester Hr. 

Chemistry 105— Qualitative Analysis . 4 

Forestry 123— Management 3 

Forestry 132— Properties of Wood .. 3 

Mechanics 101— Statics 3 

Flecti\es 4 



17 

Recommended Electives 

Entomology 152— Forest Entomology 4 

Forestry 114— Forest Economics .... 3 

Forestry 173— Problems 1 



Second Semester Hr. 

Forestry 133— Lumbering 3 

M. E. 220-Heat and Power 3 

., -ef— M. E. 221— TlimiWdyilUlliiL*- 

Mech. 102— Mechanics of Materials 4 

Plant Path. 153— Forest Pathology . . 4 

Forestry 135— Seasoning & Pres 4 

7 

18 
Recommended Electives 

Forestry 122— Forest Mensuration ... 3 
Forestry 126— Forest Measurement 

by Aerial Photographs 2 

Forestry 137— Grading Wood 

Products 3 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



105 



WOOD INDUSTRY 

The four-year Wood Industry curriculum leads to a degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Forestry and is designed primarily to develop qualified foresters for work with 
wood-using industries. The wood-using industry that includes basic lumber products, 
finished lumber and veneer products, paper and allied products ranks fourth in the 
nation as to number of wage earners employed. 

The first and second years of study are devoted to those basic preparatory subjects 
that are essential to the more technical courses that follow. The third and fourth 
years of study allow the student to obtain theory and practice in the more technical 
phases of his forestry education. Courses in business law and production management 
are included. These provide training in the fundamentals of business practice 
essential to the forester who contributes to the development of wood industries. 



SECOND YEAR 



First Semester Hr. 

Botany 67— Dendrology 3 

Agronomy 10— Forest Soils 4 

C. E. 5— Plane Surveying 4 

Economics 1— Principles 3 

English 13— Expository Writing ... 2 

Mil. Sci. 3-Basic 2 



Second Semester Hr. 

Botany 68— Dendrology 3 

Acounting 1— Principles of 

Accounting 3 

Forestry 1 1— Silvics 3 

Forestry 21— Forest Mensuration .... 4 
Forestry 133— Principles of 

Lumbering 3 

Mil. or Air Sci. 4-Basic 3 



18 



18 



SUMMER CAMP 

Forestry 101— Surveying Field Practice 3 

Forestry 102— Mensuration Field Practice 4 

Forestry 101— Forest Utilization Practices 3 



10 



First Semester 

Bus. Ad. Ill— Business Law .. 
For. 114— Forest Economics .. 
For. 131— Wood Identification 
For. 151— Forest Protection . . 

I Musics 1— General 

Physics 3— General Laboratory 
Electives 



THIRD YEAR 

Hr. Second Semester Hr. 

3 Bus. Ad. 112— Business Law 3 

3 for. 112-Silviculture 3 

3 For. 153— Forest Pathology 4 

2 For. l34-Fores( Products 3 

3 Electives 3 

1 

3 



18 



16 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Semester Hr. 

For. 123— Forest Management 3 

For. 124— Forest Finance 3 

For. 132-Properties of Wood 3 

Ent. 152— Forest Entomology 4 

Management 111— Industrial 

Management 3 

Electives 2 



Second Semester Hr. 

Forestry 135— Wood Seasoning & 

Preservation 4 

Forestry 137— Grading Wood 

Products 3 

Forestry 139— Marketing Forest 

Products 3 

Forestry 138— Advanced Lumbering . 3 

Electives 3 



16 



it 

106 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Recommended Electives 

Botany 71— Plant Physiology 
Business 51— Business Communications 
Business 1 1 1— Principles ot Marketing 
C. E. 6— Topographic Mapping 
Economics 140— Labor Problems 

(PR: Econ. 1 and 2) 
Forestry 1 10— Regional Silviculture 



Recommended Electives 
Forestry 122— Advanced Mensuration 
Forestry 125— Policy and Administration 
Forestry 141 — AVTlcllife Management 
M.E. 20— Mechanical Drawing 
Speech 11— Public Speaking 
Forestry 126— Forest Measurements by 
Aerial Photography 






COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN FORESTRY 

1,2. The Profession of Forestry. 1 and II. 1 hr. per semester. Survey of the pro- 
fession of forestry and the opportunities available to trained men. Mr. Percival 

7. Introduction to Forestry Field Practice. S. 6 to 12 weeks; 6 to 12 hr. 
Arrange with instructor before registering. Field practice in elementary forest 
surveying and measurements. Commercial tree identification and measurement 
and sample-plot work. Mr. Goodspeed and Staff 

11. Silvics. II. 3 hr. PR or cone: Bot. 68. Forest and environment factors; site and 
type characteristics. Mr. Tryon 

21. Forest Mensuration. II. 4 hr. PR: C. E. 5. Measurement of forest products, 
trees, and stands; timber estimating; introduction to growth and yield. 

Mr. Warnet 
46^146. Ornithology. II. 2 hr. PR: Biol. 1 and 2 or consent of instructor. Identic 
ncaLion, distribution, and ecology ol birds (particularly of forest lands). 

Mr. Brooks 

101. Surveying Field Practice. S. 3 hr. PR: C. E. 6. Application of surveying 
methods to forestry practice, employing the transit, precise level, staff compass, 
traverse board, and hand compass, with problems appropriate to each. Required 
of all students at summer camp. Mr. Byers and Staff 

102. Mensuration Field Practice. S. 4 hr. PR: Botany 68 and Forestry 21. Prob- 
lems in the estimation of timber volume, defect, and growth and yield, employ- 
ing various systems in common use and varying the organization and equipment 
to meet the various situations encountered. Required of all students at summer 
camp. Mr. Byers and Staff 

103. Forest Management Practices. S. 3 hr. PR: Forestry 102. Practice in marking 
timber for improvement and harvest cuttings, application of methods of treat- 
ment, and observation of the effects of past treatment on the residual stand. 
Required of all students at summer camp who are majoring in forest manage- 
ment. Mr. Byers and Staff 

104. Forest Utilization Practices. S. 3 hr. PR: Forestry 102. Study of woods 
operations, sawmills, pulp and paper plants, plyw r ood plants and other wood- 
using industries. Required of all students at summer camp who are majoring 
in wildlife management. Mr. Byers and Staff 

105. Land Utilization Practices. S. 3 hr. PR: Forestry 102. Field and laboratory 
exercises in farm and forest wildlife practices. Required of all students at 
summer camp who are majoring in wildlife management. 

Mr. Brooks and Mr. Dugan 

112. Silvicultural Systems. II. 3 hr. PR: For. 11. Systems used for natural 

reproduction; intermediate cuttings. Staff 



113. Seeding and Planting. II. 3 hr. PR: For 
practice; phases of artificial regeneration. 



Seeding and planting; nursery 
Mr. Tryon 



114. Forest Economics. I. 3 hr. PR: Economics 1 or Agr. Economics 102. Economic 
and financial aspects of forestry, forest land, and forest industries and exploita- 
tion; present and potential forest resources of the U.S. Mr. Warner 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 107 






116. Regional Silviculture. \\>\ hr. PR: For. 11; PR or cone: For. 112. Cutting 
methods for various species in different types and regions. Staff 

122. Forest Mensuration. II. 3 hr. PR: For. 21. The measurement of growth and 
yield; statistical methods applied to forest measurement problems. Mr. Warner 

123. Forest Management. l.'$ hr. PR: Summer Camp and For. 112. Practical 
silvicultural and marketing methods on forest tracts; organization of forests 
and regulation of cut to obtain sustained yield; coordination of multiple uses. 

Mr. Goodspeed 

124. Forest Finance. I. 3 hr. PR: For. 114. Cost and income items in producing 
and exploiting forest crops; appraisal of stumpage and damages. Mr. Goodspeed 

125. Forest Policy and Administration. II. 3 hr. Land policy in the United States; 
its historical, legal, and administrative development; the forester's relations 
with the public. Administration of public and private forest properties. 

Mr. Percival 

126. Forest Measurement by Aerial Photographs. II. 2 hr. PR: For. 11 and 21. 
Obtaining information on forest types and timber volumes from aerial photo- 
graphs through use of stereoscope, parallax wedge, and other photogrammetric 
devices. Staff 

127. Forest Management Plans. II. 2 hr. PR: For. 123. Preparation for profitable 
management of specific forested areas. Mr. Goodspeed 

131. Wood Identification. I. 3 hr. PR: For. 4. Identification of commercial timbers 
of U.S.; basic properties and uses of different woods. Mr. Koch 

132. Propertied of Wood. I. 3 hr. PR or cone: For. 131. Physical and mechanical 
properties of wood; testing, machining, gluing, finishing, and special processing 
of wood. Mr. Koch 

133. Lumbering. 11. 3 hr. PR: Summer Camp and For. 131. Logging practices and 
lumber manufacture. Logging and mill equipment. Important factors affecting 
lumber grades. Mr. Byers 

134. Forest Products. II. 3 hr. PR or cone: For. 131. The production and uses of 
torest products other than lumber and timbers. Mr. Reid 

135. Seasoning and Preservation. II. 4 hr. PR: For. 131. Purposes, effects, and 
methods of seasoning and preserving wood. Mr. Reid 

137. Grading Wood Products. II. 3 hr. PR: For. 21 and 131. Inspection methods 
and application of standard grading rules to forest products, with emphasis on 
the inspection of hardwood and southern pine lumber. Mr. Byers 

138. Advanced Lumbering. II. 3 hr. PR: For. 133. Organization of the business; 
operation of logging equipment, records and cost control. Mr. Byers 

139. Marketing Forest Products. II. 3 hr. PR: For. 134. Methods of marketing 
y lumber and other forest products in domestic and foreign trade. Mr. Reid 

141. Wildlife Management. II. 3 In. PR: Bot. (il and Biol. 2. Basic principles 
of handling wildlife as a forest crop. (This course is not intended to train wild- 
life specialists.) In recognition of the importance of fish, game animals, and 
fur-bearing animals in the forest, the course considers the problems of the main- 
tenance of an optimum wildlife population. Mr. Dugan 

142. Recreational Developments. II. 2 hr. PR: C. E. 6 and Summer Camp. Needs 
of the active and passive recreationist and means of supplying facilities for 
meeting these needs on public forests. Mr. Brooks 

143. The Forest Range. II. 2 hr. PR: C. E. 6 and Summer Camp. A survey of 
basic range management technique and practices on forest lands, with con- 
sideration of range mapping and important forage plants. Mr. Brooks 



108 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



144. Forest Zoology. TI. 3 hr. PR. 2 or Zool. 2 or 3. The relationships of 
mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and fish to the forest, with emphasis on the 
ecology and taxonomy of these groups. Mr. Brooks 

145. Life Histories of Game Animals. II. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or Zool. 2 or 3. Field 
and laboratory studies of game-bird and game-mammal life histories, with 
special reference to management of populations of these species. Mr. Dugan 

146. Ornithology. II. 2 hr. PR: Biol. 1 and 2 or consent of instructor. Identifica- 
tion, distribution, and ecology of birds (particularly of forest lands) . 

Mr. Brooks 
151. Forest Protection. I. 2 hr. Preventive action, preparation activities, and con- 
trol of forest fires. Mr. Percival 

170, 171, 172, 173. Forestry Problems. I, II. 1 hr. per semester. (4 hr. maximum). 

Staff 

178. Wood Utilization Studies. S. 6 to 14 weeks; no credit. Arrange with instructor 
before registering. Practical refresher course in wood technology, wood condi- 
tioning, and forest products. Mr. Reid 

181. Farm Wildlife. II, 2 hr. (Primarily for students in agriculture. Professional 
forestry students may not take this course for credit.) Fundamental principles 
of the natural propagation and management of game and other wildlife on the 
farm, with emphasis on game as a farm crop. Farm fish pond construction and 
management. Mr. Dugan 

183. Farm Woodlot Management. II. 3 hr. (Professional forestry students may 
not take this course for credit.) Practical silvicultural methods; regulations 
of the cut in order to obtain continuous production; preparation of plans for 
profitable management. Mr. Goodspeed 



The Division of Home Economics 

The Division of Home Economics occupies two floors in the north end of Oglebay 
Hall. Here may be found offices and a small departmental library, in addition to 
classrooms and laboratories equipped for the teaching of related arts, textiles and 
clothing, and foods and nutrition. Adjacent to the foods laboratories is a family-service 
unit consisting of a kitchen, dining room, and reception room. Additional laboratories 
near Oglebay Hall include University High School, two Home Management Houses, 
Nursery School, and Cafeteria. 

Offerings in the division are designed to meet a wide variety of educational 
needs. One of the first aims is to help the student understand herself and her 
potentialities and to encourage her to assume progressively more and more respons- 
ibility. She will also be given school and community laboratory experience, under 
guidance, to help her develop judgment and confidence in meeting situations. 

To assist the student in setting goals and in planning experiences which will 
help her make progress toward these goals, a special advisory system has been 
set up. Each lower-division student has a faculty adviser who counsels the student 
as to the courses and assists in solving problems directly or indirectly affecting her 
progress in the University. 

PLAN OF WORK 

Work of the first two years is largely cultural, including courses in written 
and spoken English, literature, and natural and social sciences. In addition, 
basic work in four areas— foods, clothing, art, and management— acquaints the 
student with the field of home economics. During the last two years the student 
is given the opportunity to specialize in one of several vocations. Special courses 
have been arranged for the student who wishes to stay in college only two years 



HE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 109 



and whose main interest is to prepare for homemaking. She may substitute home- 
making courses for those in the basic sciences during the first two years. 

VOCATIONS FOR HOME FXONOMISTS 

West Virginia graduates are now teaching homemaking at junior high school, 
senior high school, and college levels; others are supervising the teaching of 
homemaking. Some may be found serving as home-demonstration agents, girls' 
club leaders, or commercial demonstrators. A considerable number are engaged 
in institutional work as hospital dietitians or as managers of tea rooms, cafeterias, 
or college dining halls. Others are engaged in scientific research or in allied work 
as laboratory technicians. 

Social service, through either private or government agencies, has claimed the 
interest of some. Nursery schools also have turned to West Virginia home-economics 
graduates for supervisors. Department stores have offered a variety of interesting 
jobs in selling, counseling, interior decoration, and other phases of retailing. One or 
two graduates with a flair for writing have found work on women's magazines. 
New fields are constantly opening up, so that the person trained in home econ- 
omics has an ever- widening choice of vocations. 

The division endeavors to keep in touch with agencies which employ home 
economics graduates and to assist graduates in finding employment. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



The Division of Home Economics offers courses leading to the granting of 
a B.S. and an A.B. Degree in Home Economics. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics will be conferred upon 
any student who satisfies the entrance requirements and offers 128 hours of college 
credit and the required grade points including the courses listed below. 

General: Eng. rhetoric, literature, speech (no more than 3 hr. in latter) , 12 hr.; 
chemistry, or physical science, 8 hr.; history, psychology, economics, and sociology, 9 hr. 
(with some work in at least two fields) ; biological science, 8 hr.; physical education, 
4 hr. (Humanities 1 may be substituted for 4 hr. modern European history; Human- 
ities 2 may be substituted for 4 hr. English literature.) Total, 41 hr. 

Home Economics: foods and nutrition, 6 hr.; management, 5 hr.; textiles and 
clothing, 5 hr.; applied art, 4 hr.; child development, 2 hr.; electives in home 
economics, 18 hr. Total, 40 hr. General electives, 47 hr. Grand total, 128 hr. 

Sufficient electives are allowed to permit the student to satisfy the require- 
ments for a first-class high-school certificate to teach in West Virginia or to fulfill 
preparatory requirements for apprenticeship, internship, or similar vocational ex- 
periences in a variety of fields including those of institution management, hospital 
dietetics, food and textile research, retailing, extension work, and other government 
services. 

It is suggested that students carry a maximum of 15 hours while in the Home 
Management House or while doing Student Teaching. 

A student who is working for room and board may not carry more than 14 
hours until she has demonstrated that she is able to maintain a "C" average. 

A.B. DEGREE WITH MAJOR IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Students who wish to offer home economics as a major in the College of Arts 
and Sciences are referred to the information concerning an A.B. Degree with a 
major in home economics. 



110 



( I RRK I I \ \\1) COURSES 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

To be classified as a conditional freshman a student must have credit for 
at least 15 units of entrance requirements; to be classified as a regular freshman she 
must fulfill all entrance requirements. To be classified as a junior, 58 hours; as a 
senior, 92 hours. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR FIRST TWO YEARS 





FIRST 


YEAR 




SECOND 


YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 1 


b 


English 2 


3 


English 3, 4, 




Speech 3, 6, 




Chem. !• 


4 


Chem. 2 


4 


or 5 


3 


or 11 


3 


(or) 




(or) 




(or) 




Zool. 151 


4 


Phys. Sci. 1 




Phys. Sci. 2 




Humanities 2 


4 


Home Ec. 23 


2 


(or) 




Historv 2 


3 


Home Ec. 15 


4 


Home Ec. 14 




History 1 


3 


for) 




Home Ec. 12 


3 


or 114 


2 


(or) 




Humanities 2 


4 


Biology 1 


4 


Phvs. educ. 


1 


Humanities 1 


4 


Home Ec. 2 


2 


Econ, or sociol 


3 


Econ. or Sociol 


3 


Home Ec. 1 


2 


Home Ec. 3 


2 


Phvs. Educ. 


1 






Home Ec. 4 


2 


Phvs. educ. 


1 










Phys. educ.t 


1 















•Prospective dietitians should elect Chemistry 1 and 2. 

tStudents must elect 4 courses — one from each group: Athletics 9 or 10; 
Dancing- 2. 3. 4, or 15; Individual Activity 6. 7, 8, or 57; and Swimming 1 or 16. 

THE CURRICULUM FOR TEACHERS 

Students who wish to obtain a high school certificate to teach home economics 
must meet requirements of the State Board of Education and of the College of 
Education. Recommendation for certification is made by the Division of Home 
Economics to the Dean of the College of Education. For requirements, see the 
bulletin: Teacher Selection, Guidance, Training and Certification. 

The head of the Division of Home Economics in the College of Agriculture, 
Forestry, and Home Economics is also a member of the College of Education and 
is the adviser for students wishing to meet requirements for a high-school certificate 
to teach home economics. 

West Virginia University has been approved by the State Department of 
Education and the U.S. Office of Education to train teachers of vocational home- 
making. 

All students who meet requirements for vocational certificates in home economics 
as set forth in the bulletin, Teacher Selection. Guidance, Traiiiing and Certification, 
and who maintain an average of "C" or better in Education 163 and 124 will be 
recommended for vocational certificates. 

Students transferring from other institutions should do so not later than 
the junior year. A minimum residence of the entire senior year is required, and 
students with irregular schedules will require a longer time. 

MAJOR CURRICULA IN HOME ECONOMICS 
The Teaching Major 

(See Teacher Training Bulletin for course requirements) 



Research in Foods and Nutrition 

Recommended: English 18 (3 hr.): English 126 (2 or 3): Phvs. I and 3 (4); 
Physics 2 and 4 (4); Zool. 171 (4); Chem. 31 (4); Chem. 105 (4); Chem. 115. (3); 
Riochem. 239 (4); Math. 3 (4); Math. 4 (2); Math. 5 (4); Math. 107 (4); H. 
Ec. 101 (3);. H. Ec. 211 (2); H. Ec. 234 (3). 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



111 



Textiles and Retailing 

Recommended: Sociol. 1 ( 3 hr.); Econ. 173 (3); Fhys. 1 and 3 (4); H. Ec. 
17, 117, or 217 (3 or 4); H. Ec. 212 (2); H. Ec. 233 (2); Chem. 5 or 105 (4); 
Chetn. 6 or 106 (3-5): Chem. 31 or 131 f4); Educ. 221 (2); Art 111 (3); Psych. 132 
(3); English 126 (2-3). Selected courses in husiness administration. 

Nutrition and Dietetics 

Required: Chem. 31, 131 (4 hr.); Biochem. 239 (4); Zool. 171 (4); H. Ec. 115 
(3); H. Ec. 101 (3); H. Ec. 138 (2); H. Ec. 201 (2); Recommended: Chem. 105 
(4); Chem. 106 or 115 (3); H. Ec. 118 (2); H. Ec. 128 (2); H. Ec. 205 (3); 
H. Ec. 211 (2); Econ. 173 (3). (Refer to current A.D.A. requirements.) 

Design 

Recommended: H. E. 17 (2 hr.); H. Ec. 123 (4); H. Ec. 133 (2); H. Ec. 

233 (2); Psych. 132 (3); H. Ec. 212 (2); Art 11 or 111 (3); Sociol. 105 (3); Econ. 
127 (2); Physics 1 and 3 (4) . 

Extension, Home Service, and Commercial Work 

Recommended: H. Ec. 23 (2 hr.); H. Ec. 101 (3); H. Ec. 106 (2); H. Ec. 

234 (3); H. Ec. 214 (2); Econ. 173 (3). Suggested electives: Speech 11 (3); 
Speech 120 (3); H. Ec. 14 or 114 (2); H. Ec. 16 or 116 (2); Psych. 1 or 3 (3); 
Pol. Sci. 5 (3); Jour. 112 (2); Mus. 77 (2); Sociol. 3 or 130 (3); Sociol. 105 (3); 
Educ. 106 (3) ; Physics 1 and 3 (4) ; Selected courses in agriculture; Rural Organ. 134. 

Child Development 

Recommended: H. Ec. 14 or 114 (2 hr.); H. Ec. 101 (3); H. Ec. 121 (2); 

H. Ec. 106 (2); H. Ec. 206 (2); Psvch. 1 (3); Psych. 122 (3); Psych. 234 (3); 

Libr. Science 103 (3); Sociol. 210 (S); Psvch. 224 (3); Speech 250 (3); and 200 (3); 
Mus. 10 (2). 

MASTER'S DEGREE IN HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

The Division of Home Economics offers work at the graduate level leading 
to the degree of Master of Science in Home Economics Education. The summer 
program is planned to give special attention to needs of graduate students who wish 
to work towards this degree. 

Some courses are offered on a six- weeks basis to meet the needs of those 
who can spend several weeks on campus. For those who cannot stay for a 
full session or who prefer to work intensively on one subject at a time, the Divi- 
sion offers workshops of two or three weeks duration. These are arranged con- 
secutively so that a student may elect work in one or several workshops. 

It has been possible to obtain the services of outstanding educators to serve 
as consultants for these workshops. Those interested in the summer program 
may obtain copies of the Summer Session bulletin or other information by writ- 
ing to the head of the Division of Home Economics. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE TWO-YEAR COURSE 





FIRST 


YEAR 




SECOND 


YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 1 

History 1 

(or) 


3 
3 


English 2 
History 2 
Home Ec. 3 


3 
3 
3 


Eng. 3, 4, or 5 3-4 

(or) 
Humanities 2 4 


Speech 3, 
6, or 11 
Home Ec. 23 


3 
2 


Humanities 1 


4 


Home Ec. 2 


2 


Home Ec. 15 4 


Home Ec. 14 oi 




Home Ec. 1 


2 


Phys. educ. 


1 


Home Ec. 12 3 


114 


2 


Home Ec. 4 
Phys. educ. 


2 

1 

11-12 




11-12 


Phys. educ. 1 
Econ. or sociol. 
or psychology 3 


Phys. educ. 
Physiology 51 


1 
4 




15-16 


12 


Electives 


4-6 


Electives 


4-6 


Electives 1-3 


Electives 


4-6 



112 (I RKKIIA AM) COURSES 



SUGGESTED ELECTIVES 

Freshmen: Music 77 (1 hi.). Art 12 (3), language (3): Psychology 1 (3). 
Sophomore: Home Econ. 17 (2), 180 (2), 115 (3). 

ELECTIVES FOR STUDENTS OUTSIDE THE DIVISION 

Students in other colleges wishing to elect courses in home economics will 
find a number of courses available. The following courses are suggested: Home 
Economics 1, 2, 3, 4, 15, 115, 12, 23, 14, or 114,^32 or 132, 17, 13 or 113, 133. 
and 16 or 116. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Professor Noer and Staff. 

(1) Students in the College of Arts and Sciences who major in home economics 
must meet the requirements in that college and also the departmental requirements 
as outlined in this Catalog. 

(2) Students who wish to obtain the high-school certificate to teach home econo- 
mics must meet the requirements of the State Board of Education, the College of 
Education, and the Division of Home Economics. The B.S.H.E. degree in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics is planned to allow sufficient 
electives to meet these requirements. 

(3) Students from other colleges who wish to elect home economics courses 
without meeting the Science requirements may take Home Economics 1. 2, 3. 4. 
23, 14 or 114, 102, 32 or 132, 112, 13 or 113, 123, 133, 106, and 206; others bv con- 
sent of instructor. 

(4) Graduate students are limited to 6 hr. of "Problems" courses. 

FOODS AND NUTRITION 

Assistant Professors Chalmers and Roberts; Instructor Amick. 

1. Sec. 1. Elementary Nutrition. I, II. 2 hr. Essentials of adequate diet; applica- 
tion with particular reference to needs of college students. Miss Roberts 

1. Sec. 2. Elementary Nutrition. I, II. 2 hr. Advanced section of H.E. 1 for those 
who qualify on basis of placement test. Miss Roberts 

3? or 111.- Requirements for Normal Human Nutrition. I, II. 3 hr. Lecture 
and demonstration. Two 2-hour and one 1-hour classes per week. For stu- 
dents in other colleges. Miss Roberts 

15A Food Selection and Preparation. I. II. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 2 or Phys. Sci. 2 and 
H.E. 1, or consent. Two lectures and two laboratories. Chemical and physical 
bases for food preparation with enough experimental work to give an under- 
standing of reasons for recommended procedures in preparation of food products 
of high quality. Demonstration, discussion, and laboratory practice. 

Miss Amick 
21.' Nutrition and Foods for Nurses. I. 3 hr. Fundamental principles of human 
nutrition and of food preparation. Content of course is that given in 
"Teaching Dietetics to Student Nurses," by American Dietetic Association. 

Miss Roberts 

101. Nutrition. I. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 15 or consent. Two lectures and 1 laboratory. 

Food needs as affected by such factors as age, sex. and activity; nutritive value of 

/common foods; planning of adequate diets at different cost levels. Miss Roberts 

- 

115. Meal Planning, Preparation, and Service. I, II. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 15 or 

consent. One lecture and one 3-hour laboratory. Problems in selection 

and purchase of foods; planning, preparing, and serving of meals, including wise 

use of time and energy. Miss Amick 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 113 



121. Nutrition Work with Children. II. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 15, 115, 101. Problems 
involved in feeding children optimum diets. Opportunity for students (1) 
to prepare noon meals for University Nursery School children; (2) to observe 
a number of hot-lunch programs in and near Morgantown. Miss Robert? 

125. V Foods for Special Occasions. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 15 or consent. Preparation of 
special foods for parties, dinners, teas, and other social functions, with 
laboratory experience in organization and management of food service for 
such occasions. Offered alternate years 1952-54-56. Miss Amick 

181. w Problems in Nutrition. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. Staff 

185. v Problems in Foods. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. Staff 

201. Diet in Disease. II. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 101, Zoology 151, Chem. 131. Adaptations 
of normal diet for diseases whose prevention or treatment is largely influenced 
by diet. Offered in alternate years, 1952-54-56. Miss Roberts 

205. „ Experimental Cookery. I. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 15, Chem. 131. 1 hr. lecture, one 2 hr. 
lab., and one 3 hr. lab. Utensils, ingredients, temperature, manipulation, and 
cooking methods as they affect quality of cooked products. Offered in alternate 
years, 1953-55-57. Miss Amick 

211. Readings in Nutrition. II. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 1, 15, 107. Reviews of current 
literature and of present research. Topics depend upon needs and interests 
of class members. Miss Roberts 

215. Food Preservation. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 15 or equivalent and (or cone.) Bact. 141. 
Fundamental principles involved in preservation of foods by canning, drying, 
fermentation, curing, and freezing as applied in the home and in centers 
equipped for quantity work. 1 lecture, two 3-hr. labs. Miss Amick 

221. Community Nutrition Problems. I. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 101 or consent. Two 
hours of lectures plus fieldwork. Includes consideration of organizations and 
agencies through which these problems may be solved. Miss Roberts 

281. Problems in Nutrition. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. Staff 

285., Problems in Foods. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. Staff 

INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT 

Assistant Professor Price 

108. Quantity Cookery. I, II. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 15, 101. One lecture, two 3-hour 
laboratories arranged. Application of principles to preparation of food in 
large quantity. Use of standardized formulas, calculation of costs, and use 
of institution equipment. Cafeteria used as laboratory. Miss Price 

118. Institution Accounting. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 108. Current procedures in account- 
ing for institutions. Preparation of budgets, food-control records, financial 
statements, and reports. Offered in alternate years, 1953-55-57. Miss Price 

128. Institution Buying. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 108. Producing areas, distribution of food 
products, specifications, storage, and food practices in quantity buying. Obser- 
vation in local wholesale markets, warehouses, and storage units. Offered in 
alternate years, 1952-54-56. Miss Price 

138. Institution Organization and Management. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 108. Principles 
of organization and management of institutions of various types. Miss Price 

148. Laboratory Practice in Institution Management. I, II. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 108, 

138, and consent. (Arranged). Experience under supervision in planning, 

preparing, and serving food in an institution. Selection of place and type 
of experience to be determined by needs of students. 



114 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



188. Problems in Institution Management. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. 
*3C^0rL LtjhtH /. / ■ ^ Hop -___ 

288. Problems in Institution Management. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

Professor Noer; Assistant Professors Dietrich and Stoflet. 

2. Elementary Clothing. I, II. 2 hr. Problems in selection and construction 
of clothing. For freshman and others who do not pass placement test. 

Misses Stoflet and Noer 

12. Intermediate Clothing. I, II. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 2 or exemption of H.E. 2 

by placement test. Particular emphasis on high standards of workmanship 

and evaluation of work and progress. As students develop skill they will 

be expected to work with increasing independence. Miss Stoflet 

17. Textiles. I, II. 3 hr. Lecture and laboratory combined. Textile fibers and 
fabrics studied with view to their use in dress and in the home. Character- 
istics of the major fibers and their suitability to various uses. Study of 
standard and novelty materials with emphasis on appropriate use and care. 

Miss Dietrich 

■9S*- or 132. Clothing Techniques. II. 2 hr. Not open to home economics 
majors. Techniques for simple garment construction, remodeling, alteration, 
and repair. Problems adapted to needs of individual students. Especially 
planned for Arts students and young homemakers. Misses Stoflet and Dietrich 

102. Clothing Selection. I, II. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 3, H.E. 2, or consent. Two lectures. 
Selection of clothing for whole family from viewpoint of design, color, and 
economy. Clothing inventories and buying plans. Miss Stoflet 

112. Selection and Construction of Clothing. I, II. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 3, 12, or 
consent. Two laboratories. Construction of wool and rayon garments. Pat- 
tern alteration and adaption. Making over clothing. 

Misses Stoflet and Dietrich 

117. Textile Buying. II. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 17. Lecture and laboratory combined. 
Buying of textiles for all types of clothing and for household. At least one 
field trip required. Miss Dietrich 

182. Problems in Clothing Construction. 1, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. Staff 

in r ■ /- 

212. Advanced Clothing Construction. II. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 17, 122. Commercial 
methods of coat and suit making adapted for home use. Problems of fitting 
and pattern adaptation, using the dress form. Speed methods and perfection 

217. Readings in Textiles. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 17. Review and discussion of cur- 
rent literature reporting recent research in field. Staff 

222. Tailoring. II. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 112. Problems in teaching tailoring, including 
sources of help and new techniques. Emphasis on methods of helping 
students evaluate their own progress. Opportunity for laboratory experi- 
ence in cutting, fitting, construction, and pressing of tailored garments 

Miss Stoflet 

282. Problems in Clothing. I, II. 1-4 hr. Consent. Staff 

rf&, 287. Problems in Textiles. I, II. 1-4 hr. Consent. Staff 

APPLIED ART 

Assistant Professors Palmer and Stoflet. 

3. Art Applied to Personal Problems. I, II. 2 hr. Principles of design and color 
applied so as to help college students meet problems of daily living. Problems 
may include room arrangement, clothing, design, etc. Miss Palmer 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 115 



19. or 113. House Decoration. II. 3 hr. For nonmajors. Two lectures and one 
laboratory. Materials and furnishings that go into decoration and furnishing 
a home, with emphasis on cost, buying, and reconditioning. Miss Palmer 

23. Present-day Housing. I, II. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 3 or consent. Factors to be 

considered in providing housing for families at different income levels. Special 
attention to low-cost housing. Factors to be considered in selecting a home 
and furnishings for families of different income levels. Laboratory practice 
in improving rooms, apartments, and houses, using materials commonly 
found in rural communities and small towns. Miss Palmer 

123. Home Planning and Furnishing. 1, II. 4 hr. PR: H.E. 23. Two lec- 
tures and 2 laboratories. Fundamentals of wise planning to meet family 
needs; understanding of house structure and home needs. Discussions on 
home decorating based on various income levels and suited to various 
communities and needs. Miss Palmer 

133. Home Crafts. 1, II. 2 hr. Two laboratories. Experience in simple crafts, 
using such materials as leather, plastic, metal, paper, thread, and fabric 
for creation of useful and beautiful objects. Equipment and materials 
used are those readily available in home, school, and camp situations. 

Miss Palmer 

183. Problems in Related Art. I, II. 1-4 hr. Consent. Staff 

I /// Ho ' '■ j~S 

233. Costume Design. I. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 3, 12, 117. Techniques of figure and 
fashion drawing. Problems in designing costumes and ensembles for in- 
dividuals of various types and ages. . Miss Stoflet 

283. Problems in Related Art. I. II, 1-4 hr. Consent. Staff 

HEALTH AND CHILD CARE 

Associate Professor Brown and Staff. 

£6 or 116. Home Nursing. II. 2 hr. 1 lecture, one 2-hour laboratory. Practices 
to promote family health and caring for minor illnesses. Staff 

106. Child Development. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1 or 3 or Ed. 55 or 56, H.E. 101. 
Two lectures. Child from prenatal period to pre-adolescence. University 
Nursery School used for observing pre-school children. Each girl spends 3 
hours a week observing and assisting. Miss Brown and Miss Thoman 

186. Problems in Child Development. I, II. 1-4 hr. Consent. Staff 

206. Observation and Participation in Nursery School. I, II. 1-2 hr. PR: H.E, 
106. Directed experience in working with children in a nursery-school situ- 
ation. Laboratory and conference. Miss Brown and Miss Thoman 

O /.■ 

266. Needs of Adolescents. 3 hr. A study of adolescent needs as met by the home 
with contributions of other agencies such as church, school, and youth groups. 
Physical, social, and integrative needs will be considered from the standpoint 
of needs of all family members as well as the individual. Miss Brown 

286 Problems in Child Development. I, II. 1-4 hr. Consent. Staff 

HOME MANAGEMENT 

Professor Noer; Instructors Davis and Jones. 

4. Elementary Management. I, II. 2 hr. Simple problems in management of 
time, energy, and other resources. Practical application to problems of 
individual members of class. Miss Stoflet 



116 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



114. Management of Family Living.. II. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 4 or consent. Influence 
of home conditions on families and family members. In considering ways 
of meeting every day problems of families, an attempt will be made to apply 
findings of science and techniques of management in such way as to help fam- 
ilies achieve satisfaction in living. Mrs. Jones 

104. Nutrition and Home Management. II. 3 hr. Planned to meet needs of 
social-work majors. Not open to students majoring in home economics. 

Miss Roberts and Mrs. Jones 

124. Demonstration Techniques. II. 2 hr. PR: Minimum of 4 hours in each 
of 4 areas of home economics, and consent. Lecture demonstration as 
means of presenting home economics materials to groups. Development and 
presentation of demonstrations suitable for secondary schools and use with 
adult groups. Miss Amick 

184. Problems in Home Management. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. Staff 

214. Economic Problems of the Home. I, II. 2 hr. PR: 30 hours of H.E., Econ. 1. 
Economic problems of family. Standard of living, budgeting, and account 
keeping, buying problems. Value of household production. Providing for future. 

Miss Davis 

224. Principles of Home Management. 2 hr. Time and energy management, house 
care, pest control, buying and storing foods, use and care of home equipment, 
entertaining, money management, simple record keeping, and infant care. 
Junior standing preceding or parallel with H.E. 234. Miss Davis 

234. Home-management Laboratory. I, II. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 1, 114, 115. Arranged. 
Emphasis on satisfying family life and social relationships. Approximately 5 
weeks of home residence, and 1 hour of discussion each week throughout 
semester. H.E. 224 should be taken prior to or parallel with H.E. 234. Staff 

254. Household Equipment. 2 hr. PR: Senior Standing. Selection, arrangement, 
use, and care of equipment for various situations and for different income 
levels. Laboratory and discussion. Miss Davis 



284. Problems in Home Management. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. Staff 

JF</ H6tAE t Oh i i ■ J" 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 






Professor Noer; Associate Professor Brown; Instructor Schultz. 
Ed. 163. Materials and Methods in Home Economics. I, II. 2 hr. Mrs. Roberts 

Ed, 262. Vocational Home Economics in Secondary Schools. I, II. 2 hr. PR: 7 
hours of Education and 30 hours in home economics. Miss Noer 

209. Evaluation in Home Economics. 3 hr. PR: 30 hours of home economics, 7 
hours of Education. Experience in selecting, devising, and using evaluation 
devices for appraising student progress toward desired goals in home economics 
education. Miss Brown 

219. Adult Education in Homemaking. I. 3 hr. PR: 30 hours of home economics 
and 7 hours of Education. Current trends and present activities. Organization 
of adult classes; development of unit outlines; consideration of teaching 
methods; illustrative material and bibliography. Miss Schultz 

229. Materials for Teaching Home Economics. II. 2 hr. PR: 30 hours of home 
economics and 7 hours of Education. Offered in alternate years 1950-52-54. 

Miss Schultz 
249. History of Home Economics. 1 hr. One lecture. Miss Noer 

309. Research Methods. I, II, S. 2 hr. Adaptation of research techniques to prob- 
lems in home economics. For students writing problems or thesis. Miss Brown 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 117 



319. Home Economics Curriculum. 3 hr. PR: Experience in teaching home 
economics and consent. Selection and organization of learning experiences 
in home economics. Practices and techniques currently used for curriculum 
planning and reconstruction. Miss Brown 

329. Supervision in Home Economics. 2 hr. PR: Teaching experience and con- 
sent. Designed for home economics teachers preparing to serve as super- 
vising teachers in "off-campus" training centers. Function of supervision 
and organization of supervised teaching program. Techniques for helping 
students in training for teaching homemaking. Miss Brown 

389. Problems in Home Economics Education. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. Staff 



The College of Arts and Sciences 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Organization and Purpose 

The College of Arts and Sciences includes a lower division and an upper division. 
The lower division consists of work of the first and second years, and the upper 
division consists of work of the third and fourth years. 

Instruction in the College of Arts and Sciences is administered through the fol 
lowing departments: 

Art; biology; chemistry; classics; economics; English language and literature; 
geology, mineralogy, and geography; Germanic languages and literatures; history; 
home economics; library science; mathematics; nursing education; philosophy and 
psychology; physics; political science; Romance languages and literatures; sociology; 
social work; speech; and the Interdepartmental Program of Integrated Studies: humani- 
ties, social science, biological sciences, physical sciences, and communication. 

MAIN OBJECTIVES 

The curriculum of the College of Arts and Sciences has certain main objectives. 

1. General Culture. Work of the lower division is intended to complete what 
is usually termed " a general education." It rounds out the program of studies pursued 
in high school and promotes full development of the student (1) as an individual 
and (2) as a member of society. Ideally, the student should undergo a well-propor- 
tioned development intellectually, spiritually, physically, and emotionally. The end 
of such development should be an inner balance or stability on the basis of which 
further growth can take place. Development of the individual as a member of 
society is to be measured in terms of his or her usefulness and sense of respon- 
sibility to the social order. The student should develop the capacity for intellectual 
participation as a citizen in the community, state, country, and world. A general 
education should, therefore, provide for all students a meaningful experience ap- 
propriate to the individual and social nee.ds which all citizens have in common 
as members of a free society in the contemporary world. 

2. Specific Attributes. Most of the attributes of a general education can be 
placed in one of three categories: (1) attitudes, (2) areas of knowledge, and (3) skills. 

The following attitudes should be attained as the result of a general education: 

(1) An attitude of tolerance or open-mindedness, characterized by a cosmo- 
politan outlook that will enable the student to see beyond the limits 
of his own profession, his own economic status, and his own country; 

(2) An attitude of truth-seeking characterized by scientific objectivity and 
motivated by intellectual curiosity; 

(3) An attitude of intelligent appreciation towards nature and the arts that 
will, as far as, the student's endowments will permit, help him in his 
aesthetic and ethical choices; 

(4) An attitude of dispassionate self-appraisal, based on an understanding of 
his own nature and characterized by an awareness of his own mental 
strength and weaknesses. 

The areas of knowledge which should be the common possession of educated 
persons may be conveniently grouped in two divisions: 

(1) A knowledge of man as a social and intellectual being, of his place in 
contemporary civilization, and of that civilization's place in the history of 
man; 

(2) A knowledge of man as an organism and of man in his relation, direct 
or indirect, to the biological and physical environment in which he lives. 

118 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 119 



Three basic skills are regarded as indispensable to all educated persons: 

(1) That of self-expression or communications, involving writing, speaking, 
reading, and listening; 

(2) That of calculation, i. e., a knowledge of, and some skill in, basic math- 
ematics. 

(3) A familiarity with at least one foreign language, not only as a useful skill, 
but also as a means of promoting tolerance and sympathetic understanding 
of peoples who do not speak our language. 

COURSES RECOMMENDED 

Two types of courses are recommended to all students in the lower division as 
common means for fostering the attributes of mind and character which a 
general education should develop in the student: 

(1) Courses for the promotion of basic skills: (a) calculation and (b) com- 
munication; 

(2) General introductory courses for the elementary but organically integrated 
study of four fields of human knowledge: (a) Biological Science, (b) Social 
Science, (c) Physical Science, and (d) Humanities. 

OPPORTUNITY FOR SPECIALIZATION 

Work of the upper division is intended to provide intensive study in one 
or two fields of knowledge. It is based on the belief that an educated man or woman 
should not only know the fundamentals of several branches of study but should 
have a rather thorough knowledge of some selected field. In the upper division 
therefore, the student concentrates on a major and one or two minors. The 
curriculum is sufficiently flexible, however, to meet the needs and tastes of in- 
dividual students without at the same time exposing the student to disadvantages 
of a free elective system. 

SPECIAL PROVISIONS FOR THE JUNIOR CERTIFICATE 

Experience has shown that students whose average in high-school subjects 
was below 75 per cent, or students who ranked in the lowest one-fourth of the 
high-school graduating class, probably will not succeed in the regular college cur- 
riculum. Nevertheless, such students may, by wise selection of studies, profitably 
spend one or two years in college. Other students for financial or other reasons 
may not be able to attend college for more than one or two years. It is believed 
that students in either group may spend their time more profitably taking courses in 
which they are particularly interested from a cultural or vocational point of view 
than by following the curriculum leading to the A.B. Degree. Students who are not 
candidates for the A.B. Degree but who earn 64 hours of college credit and 128 grade 
points, including general University requirements, in residence in this college wiil 
be awarded the Junior Certificate of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

The Major Subject 

In the upper division the student concentrates on a major and one or two 
minor subjects (in departments other than the major department) selected from the 
following list of subjects: 

Art German Political Science 

Botany History Psychology 

Chemistry Home Economics Social Work 

Classics Library Science Sociology 

Economics Mathematics Spanish 

English Nursing Education Speech 

French Philosophy Zoology 

Geology Physics 



120 CLRRICT I A AND COURSES 



Classification of Students 

To be classified as a freshman in the College of Arts and Sciences a student 
must have credit for at least 15 units of entrance requirements; to be classified as 
a sophomore he must have fulfilled all entrance requirements and have credit for 
25 hours of college work; as a junior, 58 hours; as a senior, 92 hours. 

Advisers 

Lower Division. Each student in the lower division is assigned to an adviser 
who will assist in registration and who will have general supervision over the 
work of the student. Electives are chosen and changes in the program are made 
with approval of the adviser. Students are urged to confer with advisers in respect 
to any difficulties or maladjustments in college life. 

Upper Division. For transfer to the upper division a student must have com- 
pleted a minimum of 58 hours and have maintained a grade-point average of 2 on all 
work for which he received grades (except "W" and "WP"). 

Each student in the upper division is assigned to an adviser of the department 
to which the major subject belongs. The program of study and all changes in class 
assignments must be approved by the adviser. 

Standing Committees 

Curriculum Committee on General Education: Mkssrs. Manning (chairman), Ben 

nett, Crocker, Easton, Kerr, Lazzei.l, Spiker, and Vest. 
Executive: Messrs. Frasure (1954), Summers (1953), and Lazzell (1955). 
Instructional Policies and Practices: Messrs. Coi.lett (chairman), Frasure, Fridley, 

Gibbard.Gribble, Kallsen, and Summers. 
Scholarship: Messrs. Ashburn (chairman), Gobin, (). H. Cross. Cunningham, G. A. 

Hall, Mocki.er, and J. R. Williams. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

CREDIT DEFINED 

The "semester-hour" is the standard for computing the amount of work 
required for graduation in the curricula leading to these degrees. The "hour" 
represents the amount of work done in one semester (approximately 18 weeks) in one 
recitation hour with two preparation hours a week. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL DEGREES 

Foreign Language. Fewer than 6 hours in an ancient or modern language will not 
be counted tow T ards any degree, diploma, or certificate in this College unless work in 
the same language has been offered for entrance. 

English. Each undergraduate who begins his college work after June 1, 1952, 
must pass a proficiency examination in English after the beginning of his junior year 
in order to qualify for graduation. He shall take the examination during the first 
semester of his junior year, and if not declared proficient, shall repeat the examina- 
tion as many times as necessary. 

Electives. At least 6 hours must be taken in each subject as an elective, but no 
more than 9 hours in isolated courses of less than 6 hours each, selected with the 
approval of the adviser, may be offered. 

In addition to regular elective work in the College of Arts and Sciences 
which is offered by the faculties in other colleges, work not to exceed 15 hours 
in the College of Law, College of Agriculture, 15 College of Commerce, College of 
Engineering and School of Mines,! 6 School of Music,* 7 School of Physical Education 

i5ln addition to the 15 hours, the following- courses in agriculture are regular 
electives in the College of Arts and Sciences: Farm Economics 131 and all courses 
in entomology, genetics, and plant pathology. 

i6The engineering and mining electives include Chemical Engineering 186, 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 121 

i 
and Athletics,is School of Journalism, or \Z hours of upper-division work in Military 
or Air Science and Tactics, or 20 hours in the College of Education, may be included 
in the list of elective credits offered to students in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
The total number of hours elected from other colleges shall not, however, exceed 24 
hours in all. 

The course in general biochemistry (Biochemistry 239) is available (without 
additional fees) in the School of Medicine. 

Major Subject. The maximum amount of credit allowed in any one de- 
partment is ordinarily 40 hours. Exceptional cases involving extension of hours 
in the major must have the previous approval of the Scholarship Committee. 



ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE 

The degree of Associate in Arts is conferred on the student who completes 
Option B of the regular course. The core of this program is in four introductory 
general courses: Humanities, Social Science, Biological Sciences, and Physical Sciences. 

Students enrolled in the program will normally complete it in the first two years 
by taking any three of the general courses. Students who carry a reduced load or 
who wish to meet specific departmental requirements with other introductory courses 
may extend completion of the program beyond the two-year period with no reduction 
in grade points. 

Students who complete satisfactorily three area courses, as well as the regular 
requirements in a foreign language, English composition, physical education service 
program, and military (men) , will be considered to have met not only the general re- 
quirements of the University but also general (i.e., nondepartmental) requirements of 
the College of Arts and Sciences. Students who meet these requirements and have 64 
hours of college credit and a grade-point average of 2.0 on all work in residence in 
the College of Arts and Sciences will be entitled to the two-year degree of Associate 
in Arts. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Arts and Sciences is conferred 
upon any student who complies with the general regulations of the University 
concerning degrees, satisfies all entrance, college, and departmental requirements, 
and completes any one of the following courses of study: 
I. Regular course (128 hours) 

II. Premedical, Predental, and Pre- Veterinary courses (128 hours) 
III. Combined courses: 

(a) Arts and Law (123 hours) 
/ (b) Arts and Medicine or Dentistry (128 hours) 
Students transferring to West Virginia University from other institutions 
should ordinarily do so not later than the beginning of the third year. Such 
students must meet all the requirements of the lower division. All deficiencies 
must be met as soon as possible after admission to this College, whereupon 
such students may register regularly in the upper division. \' : l ■ 

Maximum and Minimum Work. The maximum number of hours per semester 
for which a student may register is 18; the minimum jf-fj A student in the upper 
division may, however, with the approval of his adviser, register for a maximum 
of 20 hours per semester without petitioning the Committee on Scholarship. 



205, 207, 238, 250, 251; Civil Engineering 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 110 and 115; Electrical 
Engineering 100, 102. 103, 110; Mechanical Engineering 20, 25, 26, 29 and 221; 
Mechanics 101, 102, 103, and 104; and Mining Engineering 106, 202, 203, and 204. 
In addition the student may elect with the consent of his adviser, when his major 
is Physics, Mechanical Engineering 105 to 107; and Ch.E. 160, 267, 268. 

i7The music electives include Theory of Music 1, 2, 3, 4, 77, 78 109 110 111 
112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 180, 182, 183, 240, 241, and 281; Ensemble 153*, 154* 
155, and 156; classes in orchestra instruments 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, and 196. 
Men's Glee Club, Women's Glee Club, and University and Community Orchestra; 
and piano or voice or violin or pipe organ or band and orchestra instruments 

isThe electives in physical education are P.E. 77, 151, 67, 278, and Safety 
Education 281. 



122 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 







1. Regular Course (128 Hours) 

LOWER-DIVISION CURRICULUM 

Option A: 

(a) General University Requirements. 
Military or Air science 19 — 8 hours. 
Physical education (men) 2 "— 2 hours. 
Physical education (women) 2 "— 4 hours. 

(b) Science. At least 8 hours of a laboratory science chosen from the following 
list: biology, botany, chemistry, geology, physical science, physics, psychology, 
and zoology. 

(c) Foreign Language. To be eligible for graduation a student must have com- 
pleted twelve semester hours in a foreign language in college or two units 
for entrance and six hours beyond courses 1 and 2 in the same language in college. 

(d) English Composition. Ordinarily 6 hours of English composition (English 
1 and 2) will be required of all freshmen. In case a freshman is not qualified 
to meet the requirements in English 1, as shown by placement or other 
tests, he (or she) will be assigned to English O, which carries 3 hours of 
University credit. Upon the successful completion of the work in English 
O the student will register for the regular work in English 1 and 2. 

(e) Additional. At least 6 hours in each of three of the following: 

(1) Art. 

(2) Economics 

(3) English (additional to d). 

(4) Foreign language (other than c). 

(5) General introductory courses. 

(6) History. 

(7) Home economics. 

(8) Mathematics. 

(9) Philosophy and psychology. 

(10) Political science. 

(11) Science (other than b). 

(12) Sociology. 

(13) Speech. 
Electives, under the supervision of the adviser, to make a total of 64 hours. 

Ordinarily freshmen should register for required courses. Electives should be 
used in the second year chiefly in meeting the preliminary requirements of 
the departments in which students expect to do the work of the major 
(or minors) in the upper division. 

Option B: General Course Program of Integrated Studies (64 Hours) 

A sample schedule of courses for students enrolled in the whole program 
of Integrated Studies and planning to complete it in two years follows. 



i9Military or air science is required of all male students except those who at 
the time of matriculation are 23 years of age or have completed no less than 58 
hours of work, and all who have credit for 8 hours of military or air science or 
1 unit of entrance credit in military academy. Students must register for mili- 
tary science upon their entrance into the Lniversity and continue in the course 
until the full requirement has been met or until a regular exemption card is 
filed in the Registrar's office. 

20Two hours of physical education service program for men, to be taken 
during the first year of residence, and four hours of physical education service 
program for women, to be taken during the first and second years in residence, 
are required for graduation of students presenting fewer than 58 semester hours, 
unless previous credit has been allowed. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



123 



FIRST YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Humanities 1 4 

Biological or Physical Sciences 1 . . . . 4 

Communication i 2 i or English 1 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Physical education 1 

Mil. or Air Sci. 1 2 

Electives 1-3 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Humanities 2 4 

Biological or Physical Sciences 2 4 

Communication 2 21 or English 2 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Physical Education 1 

Mil. or Air Sci. 2 2 

Electives 1-3 



Maximum hours allowed 



18 



18 



SECOND YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Social Science 1 4 

Physical education (women) 1 

Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 

Electives?? 11-13 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Social Science 2 4 

Phvsical education (women) 1 

Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 

Electives 2 - 11-13 



Maximum hours allowed 



18 



18 



UPPER-DIVISION CURRICULUM 

1. A major sequence of 18 to 24 hours of upper-division courses, preceded by 
the proper lower-division courses prescribed as preparation for the major. This 
work should represent a coherent and progressive sequence of courses as 
outlined in the departmental announcements. The major subject will be 
selected when the student registers in the upper-division, but the student 
must plan the work in the lower division in such a way as will meet the 
departmental requirements for the major and minor. 

2. A minor sequence of 9 to 12 hours of upper-division courses, preceded by 
proper lower-division courses, in some department closely related to the major 
department. At the option of the major department, a second minor of 6 
hours may be required in a second department closely related to the major 
department. 

$. Electives, under supervision of the departmental adviser, to make a total of 
128 hours. At least %/£ of 64 hours in the upper division must be selected 
from the upper-division courses. A departmental adviser may permit a student 
in the upper-division to elect lower-division courses to an amount not exceed- 
ing 12 hours when such action will be an advantage to the student in connection 
with the major or minor sequence. 

Premedical, Predental, and Pre- Veterinary Courses (128 Hours) 



II. 

The following sequence of courses is worked out for the general guidance of 
students who are preparing for the study of Medicine, Dentistry, Pre-Veterinary 
Medicine, and the related professions. All of the required subjects are included. 
While the pre-professional student is meeting the entrance requirements of profes- 
sional schools, committees on admissions of professional schools prefer that he use his 
elective hours to secure a broad, general training rather than to secure a large number 
of credits in any one special field. Leading medical and dental educators in the United 



2iStudents enrolled in the program of Integrated Studies normally will take 
Communication 1 and 2 (reading, writing, listening, speaking) instead of English 
1 and 2. 

^Students who do not present two units in a foreign language for entrance 
and who complete six hours in the same language in college must use three hours 
of electives here to complete the language requirements. Students who expect 
to complete the four-year course for a baccalaureate degree should use electives 
to complete prerequisites for a major or minor field while in the lower division. 



124 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



States today also are definitely in favor of a good general training rather than exten- 
sive specialization in the so-called premedical sciences. 

It is recommended that all students plan to complete the requirements for the 
Bachelor of Arts Degree. 

Recommended Curriculum for A.B. Degree in Premedicine or Predentistry. 



FIRST YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

English 1 3 

Chemistry 1 4 

Zoology 1 4 

Mathematics 2 or 3 3 

Physical Education 1 

Mil. or Air 1 2 



Second Sem. Hr. 

English 2 3 

Chemistry 2 4 

Zoology 2 4 

Mathematics 4 or 10 3 

Physical Education 1 

Mil. or Air 2 2 



17 



17 



First Sem. 

English 3 or 5 3 

Physics 1 and 3 4 

Chemistry 5 or 15 or 63 3-4 

French or German 3 

Psychology 1 or elective 2-3 

Mil. or Air 3 2 

Physical Education (Women) 1 



SECOND YEAR 

Hr. Second Sem. 



Hr 



English 4 or 6 3 

Physics 2 and 4 4 

Chemistry 15 or elective 3-4 

French or German 3 

Psychology 1 or elective 2-3 

Mil. or Air 4 2 

Physical Education (Women) 1 



Maximum hours allowed 



18 Maximum hours allowed 



18 



THIRD YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

French or German 3 

Chemistry 5 or 15 or 63 3-6 

or 233 or elective 

Zoology 231 or elective 5 

Nonscience electives 3-6 



Second Sem. Hr. 

French or German 3 

Chemistry 15 or 233 3-6 

or 238 or elective 

Zoology 232 or 255 4-5 

or elective 
Nonscience electives 3-6 



Maximum hours allowed 



19 Maximum hours allowed 



19 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Chemistry 233 or elective 4-5 

Zoology 231 or elective 5 

Electives 6-10 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Chemistry 238 or elective 4-5 

Zoology 232 or 255 4-5 

or elective 
Electives 6-11 



Maximum hours allowed 



19 Maximum hours allowed 



19 



Many medical schools recommend that Chemistry 233 and 238 and Zoology 231 
be taken the year preceding entrance to medical school. 

Candidates for the A.B. Degree in Premedicine or Predentistry should com- 
plete the following minimum number of credit hours in the subjects listed. English, 
12 hr; French or German, 12 hr.; Mathematics, 6 hr.; Chemistry, 23 hr. (must in- 
clude Chemistry 1, 2, 15, 63, 233, 238); Zoology, 17 hr. (must include Zoology 1, 2, 
231, and 232 or 255) ; Physics, 8 hr.; Psychology, 3 hr.; Nonscience group, 30 hr. (to 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



125 



be selected from Art, English, Humanities, Economics, Sociology, History, Political 
Science, Philosophy, Speech, Foreign language, Education, Latin, Music). 

Some medical schools require both French and German. If both are taken, those 
hours in excess of 12 may be counted toward nonscience group. 

Courses to complete the 128 hours required for graduation may be selected from 
Chemistry, Mathematics, nonscience group, Physics, Psychology, Zoology. 

Courses offered as lower division courses in other institutions may not be 
transferred and offered as substitutes for upper-division courses of a similar title 
required in the above curriculum. 

PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE (128 HOURS) 

A course of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Premedicine. 

FIRST YEAR 

Same courses as recommended in the regular curriculum for the Bachelor of Arts 
Degree in Premedicine or Predentistry preceding this outline. 



SECOND YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Physics 1 and 3 4 

Chemistry 5 or 63 4 

Animal Husbandry 11 3 

Military or Air Sci. 3 2 

Electives 3-4 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Physics 2 and 4 4 

Chemistry 15 3 

Dairy Husbandry 12 3 

Poultry Husbandry 1 4 

Military or Air Sci. 4 2 

Electives 2 



Maximum hours allowed 16-18 



18 



THIRD YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Chemistry 131 or 233 4 

Genetics 221 2 

Dairy Husbandry 111 3 

French or German 3 

Electives 6 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Biochemistry 139 or 

Chemistry 238 4 

Bacteriology 141 4 

French or German 3 

Electives 6 



18 



FOURTH YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Zoology 231 5 French or German 3 

Biology 273 4 Biology 274 4 

French or German 3 Electives as needed to complete the 

Electives 6 128 hours, minimum for graduation. 

18 



A minimum of 24 hours should be selected from the following fields: History, 
Foreign Languages, English, Political Science, Speech, Psychology, Economics, Sociology, 
Philosophy. Additional courses in the sciences or appropriate courses in Agriculture 
may be chosen to complete the required number of hours for graduation. The student 
may alter the above curriculum, to meet the requirements of specific schools, with 
approval of his adviser and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 



126 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



III. Combined Courses 

(a). ARTS AND LAW (123 HOURS) 

Three years (96 hours) in College of Arts and Sciences, and one full year (27 hours) 
in College of Law 

A pre-legal course has two main objectives. The first is to enable the stu- 
dent to acquire general cultural background, which is in harmony with the chief 
purpose of the College of Arts and Sciences. The second is to help the stu- 
dent to secure a more specialized background for the legal course to follow. 

In nearly all cases these objectives can be attained more effectively by 
taking the regular four-year Arts and Sciences course, during the last two years 
of which the student may choose his major and minor with particular reference 
to his legal work. In addition to securing the Bachelor of Arts Degree, it will 
qualify him for admission to almost any law school. 

To enable students to receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor 
of Laws in a shorter period of time, a special course has been arranged by 
which the student may complete the required studies in the College of Arts and 
Sciences in three years and, after passing the entire first year of work in the 
College of Law, be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Arts. This course satisfies 
the entrance requirements to the College of Law, but permits freedom in choosing 
electives. The student should confer with the pre-law adviser as soon as he enters 
the University. The following schedule is suggested as being adapted to the above 



course: 












FIRST 


YEAR 


SECOND 


YEAR 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 3 


English 9 3 


English 10 


3 


Botany, chemis- 




Botany, chemis- 


Language 3 


Language 


3 


try psychol., 




try, psychol., 


History 52 2 


History 53 


3 


geology, phys 




geology, phy- 


Polit. Sci. 5 3 


Polit. Sci. 106 


3 


ics, zoology, 




sics, zoology, 


Electives (lower- 


Electives 




physical sci- 




physical sci- 


division cours- 


Mil. or Air Sci. 


4 2 


ence, or biolo- 




ence, or biolo- 


es should be 






gy 


4 


gy 4 


taken in the 






French, German 




French, German, 


departments in 






or Latin23 


3 


or Latin23 3 


which the stu- 






History 1 or 


3 


History 2 or 3 


dent may wish 






Humanities 1 


4 


Humanities 2 4 


to do upper-di- 






Mil. or Air Sci. 


1 2 


Mil. or Air Sci. 2 2 


vision work) 






Phys. educ. 


1 


Phys. educ. 2 1 


Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 






Max. hr. 16-17 


Max. hr. 16-17 








THIRD 


YEAR 


FOURTH YEAR 




Prelaw major 


(upper-division 


27 hi. in the College 


of Law 




work) 




12 








Pre-law minor 


(upper-division 








work) 




9 








Electives 




9-15 









32 or more hours 

(b). ARTS AND MEDICINE OR DENTISTRY (COMBINED COURSE) 

(Recommended Curriculum for a Combined Course in Arts and Medicine or 
Dentistry.) 

23Latin 1 and 2 are recommended for students not having entrance credit of 
2 units in this subject. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 127 

Students who enter a School of Medicine or a School of Dentistry after the 
completion of 90 hours, exclusive of military science and physical education, of the 
premedical and predental curriculum receive the Bachelor of Arts Degree upon 
the successful completion of the first year of medicine or dentistry. 

A student who is a candidate for the A. B. Degree under the provisions of this 
curriculum must submit, at the time of his acceptance in an accredited School of 
Medicine or School of Dentistry, a petition for the degree to his adviser who will 
forward it with his recommendation to the Scholarship Committee. If the petition 
is approved, the candidate will be recommended for graduation upon receipt of 
certification from the professional school to the Registrar of the University to the 
effect that he has successfully completed the first year of medicine or dentistry. 

FIRST YEAR 
Same courses as recommended in Curriculum for A.B. Degree in Premedicine or 
Predentistry. 

SECOND YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

English 3 or 5 3 English 4 or 6 3 

Physics 1 and 3 4 Physics 2 and 4 4 

Chemistry 5, 15 or 63 3-4 Chemistry 15 or elective 3 

French or German 3 French or German 3 

Psychology 1 or electives 2-3 Psychology 1 or electives 2-3 

Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 

Physical Education (Women) 1 Physical Education (Women) 1 

Maximum hours allowed 16-18 16-18 

THIRD YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Chemistry 233 4-5 Chemistry 238 4-5 

French or German 3 French or German 3 

Zoology 231 5 Zoology 232 or 255 4-5 

Nonscience electives 5-6 Nonscience electives 6-7 



Maximum hours allowed 19 19 

The following minimum number of credit hours must be completed in the courses 
listed, English, 12 hr.; French or German, 12 hr.; Mathematics, 6 hr.; Chemistry 23 hr. 
(must include Chemistry 1, 2, 115, 233, 238, and 105 or 163); Zoology 17 hr. (must 
include Zoology 1, 2, 231, and 232 or 255) ; Physics, 8 hr.; Psychology, 3 hr.; Nonscience 
group, 12 hr. (see listing of nonscience courses as itemized in Curriculum II) . Courses 
taken as lower-division courses in other institutions may not be transferred and offered 
as substitutes for upper-division courses of a similar title required in the above cur- 
riculum. A minimum of 60 hours, including the last 30 hours, of the required total 
of 90 hours must have been completed in the College of Arts and Sciences of West 
Virginia University. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

The Bachelor of Science Degree is conferred upon a student who complies with 
the general regulations of the University concerning degrees, satisfies all entrance 
and college requirements, and completes the requirements of one of the fields listed 
below: 

1. Chemistry (See page 141). 

2. Geology (See page 155). 

3. Nursing Education (See page 171). 

4. Social Work (See page 186). 

For details of the course of study in each of the above fields consult the depart- 
mental announcements. 



128 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



A SECOND BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

A student who has received a Bachelor's Degree in one department or college 
of West Virginia University may become eligible for a second Bachelor's Degree 
by earning an additional 30 semester hours in residence in the College of Arts and 
Sciences and meeting all requirements, departmental and otherwise, of the second 
Bachelor's Degree. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

Not leading to degrees in the College of Arts and Sciences 

A. Pre-Commerce Curriculum 

Effective September 1, 1952, candidates for the degrees of Bachelor of Science in 
Business Administration or Bachelor of Science in Economics will be registered in the 
College of Arts and Sciences during their freshman and sophomore years. They will 
then be transferred to the College of Commerce, provided they have completed all 
lower division requirements of that College. (For further information see the 
Announcements of the College of Commerce). 

B. Pre-Education Curriculum 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education and Bachelor of 
Science in Elementary Education are registered in the College of Arts and Sciences 
until they have completed 58 hours or more of academic work in the lower division 
of the College, with a grade-point average of 2.0. They are then transferred to the 
College of Education. During the Pre-Education period students are advised to 
complete as many as possible of the general courses required by the College of Educa- 
tion and for State certification, as shown in the bulletin, Teacher Selection, Guidance, 
Training and Certification and/or the Announcements of the College of Education 
available at the Registrar's office. 

In addition to the above general academic requirements students preparing to 
teach in high school are advised to complete as many as possible of the required 
academic courses in two teaching fields. Those preparing to teach in the elementary 
school will follow directions applicable to that field. 

Upon the successful completion of the entire 64 hours of work in the lower 
division, Pre-Education students are eligible for the Junior Certificate of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 



TEACHING CERTIFICATES 

The Dean of the College of Education is authorized by the Board of Governors to 
recommend all applicants for teaching certificates. 

High-school teaching certificates may be obtained by students registered in the 
College of Arts and Sciences as well as in the College of Education, provided they 
meet the requirements for certification. To qualify for the elementary-school 
teaching certificate the student will transfer to the College of Education at the begin- 
ning of the junior year. 

For specific requirements in regard to certification see the bulletin Teacher 
Selection, Guidance, Training and Certification and/or the Announcements of the 
College of Education available at the Registrar's office. 

Candidates for the A. B. Degree who wish to qualify for teaching certificates 
should indicate this fact to their adviser and plan their entire course with this in 
view. Unless this is done by the end of the freshman year, students may encounter 
difficulties in qualifying for the certificate by the time they receive the degree. As 
a check, consultation should be had each semester with Sallie S. Board or R. L. 
Birch, advisers of Pre-Education candidates for high-school teaching certificates 
or with Frank Herrera or T. J. Kallsen, advisers of Pre-Education candidates for 
elementary-school teaching certificates. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



129 



C. Pre-Journalism Curriculum 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism are registered in 
the college of Arts and Sciences until they have earned at least 58 semester hours of 
college credit. During the freshman and sophomore years they should have completed 
all or most courses specified for pre-journalism majors. 

A pre-journalism student who has not maintained at least a "C" average in 
all his college subjects during his first two years is strongly advised not to en- 
roll in the professional school. If his average grade in English 1 and English 2 was less 
than "B," he should register for English 13 during his sophomore year. Before or 
soon after entering the University a student planning to become a journalism major 
should learn the touch system of typewriting. Since shorthand is of great practical 
value and frequently aids a graduate in obtaining a position, all students, especially 
those expecting to become assistants to executives, are urged to learn it before 
coming to college or during their freshman or sophomore year. 



The recommended pre-journalism curriculum follows: 



FIRST 
Hr. 
3 



Ftrst Sem. 
English 1 
History 1 3 

Science 4 

Foreign lang. 3 

Introduction to 
U.S. Journal- 
ism 1 
Phys. educ. 1 
Mil. or Air Sci. 1 2 
Electives 0-2 



YEAR 
Second Sem. 
English 2 
History 2 
Science 
Foreign lang. 
Introduction to 

Reporting 

Skills 
Phys. educ. 
Mil. or Air Sci. 
Electives 



Hr. 

3 
3 
4 
3 



1 

1 

22 

0-2 



First Sem. 
Newspaper 

Reporting 
History 52 
Foreign lang. < 

English 6* 
Economics 1 
Psychology If 
Mil. or Air Sci 
Phys. educ. 

( worn en) 
Electivesf 



SECOND YEAR 

Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 
Newspaper 

3 Reporting 3 

3 History 53 3 

or Foreign Lang, or 

3 English 4* 3 

3 Economics 2 3 

3 Polit. Sci. 5 3 

3 2 Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 
Phys. educ. 

1 (women) 1 

0-7 Electivesf 0-4 



Max. hr. 



16-17 



16-17 



16-17 



16-17 



♦Majors unable to schedule English 4 and English 6 in their sophomore year 
will be required to take them in their junior year. 

tA sophomore expecting to become a high-school teacher will choose an 
elective in his intended teaching field as a substitute for Psychology 1 and in 
his junior year will take Education 105, Educational Psychology. 



D. Pre-Nursing Curriculum 

The pre-professional nursing curriculum is offered by the Department of Nursing 
Education to students who are interested in professional nursing as a career, and who 
plan to enter a collegiate school of nursing. The Pre-Nursing Curriculum is designed 
to provide two years of general college work consisting of subjects required in most of 
the accredited collegiate schools; to stimulate and guide students in selection of 
courses in the physical and social sciences, in education and in the humanities, as a 
basis for the basic professional nursing programs leading to the baccalaureate degree: 
and to give students the personal rewards and satisfactions of working with and 
helping others, and of participating in Nursing's contribution to family and national 
welfare in a democratic society as students and graduates of collegiate schools of 
nursing. Students are advised to select, as early as possible, the school of nursing 
they plan to enter, so that any specific requirements can be included in the required 
and elective hours provided. Experience has shown that students who fail to attain 
a minimum average of "C" may find it difficult to obtain admission to the school of 
nursing of their choice. 



130 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 





FIRST 


YEAR 






SECOND 


YEAR 


First Sem 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Fi'rsf Sem 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Eng. 1 


3 


Eng. 2 


3 


Eng. Lit. 


3 


Eng. Lit. 3 


Chem. 1 


4 


Chem. 2 


4 


Sociol. 1 


3 


Sociol. 2 or 210 3 


Zool. 1 


4 


Zool. 2 


4 


Psych. 1 


3 


Psych. 122 or 125 3 


Lang., Hist., 




Lang., Hist., 




Hlth. Educ. 


2 


Educ. 105 3 


or elective 


3 


or elective 


4-5 


Elective 


4-5 


Elective 4 


P.E. 


1 


P.E. 


1 


P.E. 


1 


P.E. 1 



15 



16-17 



16-17 



17 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

Students in the Pre-Nursing Curriculum major who wish to complete the require- 
ments for the Bachelor's Degree in the third and fourth years at West Virginia 
University are advised to select a major and minor subject from either sociology, 
social work, psychology, education, or zoology. This preparation meets the require- 
ments for entrance into University Schools of Nursing whose basic professional programs 
lead to the Master of Nursing Degree. 

E. Pre-professional Social Work 

An undergraduate pre-professional social work curriculum for juniors and 
seniors is available in the Department of Social Work. The purposes of this 
curriculum are to prepare students for graduate professional training, to qualify 
students for positions in social agencies for which graduate professional education is not 
now required, and to provide understanding of social work for those students who 
desire it as a part of their general education. (See departmental announcements.) 

F. Curriculum in Medical Technology 

The curriculum outlined below is designed to satisfy the course requirements 
for admission to the specialized and technical training portion of the curriculum 
in Medical Technology offered by the School of Medicine. 

Students are not transferred automatically from the pre-professional course 
(first two years) to the professional course (third year). Only a limited number 
of students can be accommodated in the third and fourth years. Preference is 
given to residents of West Virginia. Application for admission to the third year 
should be made on forms obtainable from the School of Medicine and must be 
presented at the office of the dean of the school. Applications should be made in 
February and will be considered after the first of April. Admission to the third 
year is on the recommendation of the Committee on Medical Technology and 
with the approval of the Dean of the Medical School. 



First Sem. 

Chemistry 1 4 

Zoology 1 4 

English 1 3 

French or German 3 

Mil. or Air Sci. 1 2 

Physical Education 1 

Electives (Women) 2 



FIRST YEAR 
Hr. Second Sem. 



Hr. 



Chemistry 2 4 

Zoology 2 4 

English 2 3 

French or German 3 

Mil. or Air Sci. 2 2 

Physical Education 1 

Electives (Women) 2 



Maximum hours allowed 



17 



17 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



31 



SECOND YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Chemistry 5 or 63 3-4 

English 3 or 5 3 

French or German 3 

Physics 1 and 3 4 

Physical Education (Women) 1 

Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 

Electives 2-3 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Chemistry 15 3 

English 4 or 6 3 

French or German 3 

Physics 2 and 4 4 

Physical Education (Women) 1 

Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 

Electives 3-4 



Maximum hours allowed 18 

Under the jurisdiction of the School of Medicine 



18 



THIRD YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Bacteriology 220 5 

Chemistry 131 4 

Zoology 231 5 

Electives 3 



Second Sem. Hr 

Physiology 141 4 

Biochemistry 139 4 

Zoology 255 4 

Clinical laboratory 

diagnostic methods 151 4 



Maximum hours allowed 



17 



16 



FOURTH YEAR 

Work of the fourth year consists of practical experience under careful supervision 
in laboratories and hospitals. At present this training is given in the Department 
of Pathology of West Virginia University, the State Hygiene Laboratory, the Charleston 
General Hospital, and Fairmont General Hospital. This work continues throughout 
an entire calendar year. Students register in the University for a Summer Session 
(about 15 weeks) in addition to two regular semesters. See Medical Technology 
Bulletin for list of courses. 

G. Pre-Veterinary 

The following sequence of courses is worked out for the general guidance 
of students who are preparing for the study of Veterinary Medicine. 

These courses have, in addition to the minimum requirements, certain courses 
of general cultural value. 

Students who desire to pursue a course in Agriculture while completing en- 
trance requirements to a school of veterinary medicine should enroll in the basic 
curriculum in Agricultural Science in the College of Agriculture. 

THREE-YEAR COURSE 

This course dots not lead to a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. 



FIRST YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

English 1 3 

Chemistry 1 4 

Mathematics 2 or 3 3 

Zoology 1 4 

Mil. or Air Sci. 1 2 

Physical Education 1 



Second Sem. Hr. 

English 2 3 

Chemistry 2 4 

Mathematics 4 or 10 3 

Zoology 2 4 

Mil. or Air Sci. 2 2 

Physical Education 1 



17 



17 



132 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



SECOND YEAR 

• 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Physics 1 and 3 4 Physics 2 and 4 4 

Chemistry 5 or 63 3-4 Chemistry 15 3 

Animal Husbandry 11 3 Dairy Husbandry 12 3 

Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 Poultry Husbandry 1 4 

Electives 3-4 Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 

Electives 2 

Maximum hours allowed 16-18 18 

THIRD YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Chemistry 131 or 233 4 Biochemistry 139 or 

Genetics 221 3 Chemistry 238 4 

Dairy Husbandry 111 3 Bacteriology 141 4 

Electives 8 Electives 8-10 

Maximum hours allowed 18 16-18 

Twenty hours of electives should be chosen from the following fields: History, 
Foreign Languages, English, Political Science, Speech, Psychology, Economics, Socio- 
logy, Philosophy. Additional electives may be chosen from the Biological Sciences 
and/or courses in Agriculture. Students should check entrance requirements of the 
schools to which they are seeking admittance. The above course of study may be 
altered to meet those requirements as far as possible. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION AND CURRICULA 

INTEGRATED STUDIES 

Professor Crocker (chairman); Assistant Professor Kallsen; Instructors Chapman, 
Delchamps, Santymire, and Satin; and Interdepartmental Staff 

Integrated Studies covers four main areas of knowledge and certain basic skills. 
In the four principal fields of knowledge, courses cut across departmental lines 
as follows: (1) Humanities: history, Romance languages, English language and 
literature, speech, Germanic languages and literature, art, philosophy, music; (2) 
Social Studies: political science, psychology, economics and business administration, 
sociology, economics, social work; (3) Biological Sciences: zoology, botany, psychology; 
(4) Physical Sciences: geology, geography, chemistry, physics, mathematics, astronomy. 
In the basic skills, courses are offered in Communication: writing, reading, speaking, 
and listening. 

In the lower division, the four introductory general courses provide (a) general 
knowledge of subjects not covered by the student's field of major interest and (b) 
perspective for later concentration in certain fields. These courses are, in addition, 
recommended for the student who has not chosen a field of specialization. The 
student will have through these introductions to the main bodies of knowledge an 
opportunity to discover his real interests and aptitudes for more advanced study. 
The Communication courses develop proficiency in the skills of writing, reading, 
speaking, and listening, and thus contribute toward successful work during college and 
after graduation. Available to all students in the University are laboratory and 
clinical facilities for corrective work in speech, reading, writing, and listening. 

In the upper division, courses are offered that continue at an advanced level the 
study of important ideas and concepts in the various fields of learning. A deliberate 
attempt is made to secure in these courses an integrated understanding of a par- 
ticular subject and its important connections with related fields. These courses 
frequently consider problems not encountered in sharply defined departmental or 
specialized courses, and they serve to provide the student with important cross- 
connections between established disciplines. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 133 

Courses of Instruction 
i. the humanities 

1, 2. Introductory General Course. I, II. 4 hr. per semester. 

This course is designed to bring to the student's attention cross sections of his 
civilization at those points where its development has been most significant. In 
accordance with this aim a substantial part of the course is its background 
of history, to which are added a survey of world literature, enough philosophy 
to acquaint the student with the principal thought patterns employed by 
Western man, the, main developments in art and architecture, and some music. 
A constant attempt is made in the lectures and discussions to relate the past 
with the present, and to show the continuity of what we call Western Civiliza- 
tion. 

The assigned readings constitute the most important feature of the course, 
in that they supply most of the factual material. Lectures are primarily for 
the purpose of orientation— to help the student interpret the reading. Lectures 
on art, architecture, and music are illustrated. Weekly discussion periods are 
an important part of the course. In them students meet small groups with 
an instructor, and an effort is made to help them understand the relations 
of the past to present-day problems. Through the aid of a syllabus, the 
course is shown in perspective in order that it may be better conceived as a 
whole. Mr. Manning and Staff 

112. The Medieval Synthesis. II. 3 hr. This course emphasizes the organic unity 
of medieval civilization as exemplified in literature, art, theology, and society. 
Illustrative material will include readings in the religious and secular works 
of the period, reproductions of medieval art and architecture and music. 

Mr. Cresswell and Staff 

141. Great Books. (First Course). I. 3 hr. Five literary masterpieces in translation 
are considered in this course: Plato's Republic, St. Augustine's City of God, 
Dante's Divine Comedy, Cervantes' Don Quixote, and Goethe's Faust. Taken 
separately and in order they represent the Greek world, late Roman Empire, 
Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Modern period; they are from the classical 
Latin, late Latin, Italian, Spanish, and German. Taken as a group they 
illustrate the persistent conflict in the literature of Western Civilization 
between the actual and the ideal. Staff 

142. Great Books. (Second Course). II. 3 hr. Five literary masterpieces, of which 
four are in translation, are considered in this course: Marcus Aurelius' 
Meditations, Benvenuto Cellini's Memoirs, Montaigne's Essays, Rousseau's Con- 
fessions, and Henry Adams' Education of Henry Adams. These evaluations of 
the problems of life, ranging from the time of the Roman Empire to the 
modern American period, constitute the integrating principle of the course. 

Staff 
181, 182. American Civilization. I, II. JS hr. per semester. This course is 
designed to acquaint the student with the salient characteristics of American 
Civilization as they have developed since the planting of European colonies 
on this continent. Emphasis is placed on the unique contributions of 
successive arrivals on American shores to the making of a distinctive Amer- 
ican culture, as evidenced in its folkways, arts, and philosophy. The central 
theme of the course is the manifestation of the democratic spirit in the 
achievements in thought and feeling of the American people. This course is 
open to all upper-division students. Mr. Foster and Staff 

II. THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

1, 2. Introductory General Course. I, II. 4 hr. per semester. The general 
course in social science aids the student in his preparation for citizenship by 
advancing his understanding of the social order. Major attention is given to 
an analysis of economic, political, and other social conditions now existing in 



134 CURRICULA WO COURSES 



the United States. A brief analysis of the place of this country in world 
affairs is included. The course is organized on the basis of two lectures and two 
discussion periods each week. Mr. Gibbard and Staff 

III. THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

1, 2. Introductory General Course. I, II. 4 hr. per semester. Primarily for the 
student who is not a major in biology, the Introductory General Course 
deals with the basic values of biology in relation to civilization and modern 
culture. The course considers the organization and function of living 
organisms in general, as well as the relations between these organisms and 
the connection with their physical environment; but emphasis throughout 
is placed on the importance of the human being and his relationships 
with other organisms. 

Individual student participation is encouraged in discussion periods and 
in the laboratory, where subject matter may require some group work with 
equipment and specimens. Lectures are amplified by moving pictures and 
by demonstrations (one room being continually reserved for demonstrations 
that illustrate subject matter of the course). Mr. Bennett and Staff 

103. Botany Hn Human Affairs. I, II. 4 hr. per semester. PR: Biology 1 and 2 
or Botany INand 2. Primarily for non-botany majors, Botany 103 is a lecture- 
demonstration course relating botany to the life and well-being of man. Ref- 
erences to the principles of botany emphasize practical application rather 
than pure science. Instruction includes lectures illustrated with moving 
pictures and slides, discussion periods, student explanations, and demonstra- 
tions. Mrs. Vandervort 

208. Great Texts in Biology. II. 1 hr. PR: Biology 2 or equivalent. A study 
of some of the great classics in biology, such as Theophrastus' Enquiry into 
Plants, Vesalius' Epitome, Harvey's Circulation of the Blood, Darwin's Origin 
of Species, and Mendel's Experiment on Hybrid Plants. The course is designed 
to acquaint the student with the historical and philosophical background of 
modern biology and to show how the utilization of the scientific method has 
resulted in the great biological discoveries. Mr. Core 

IV. THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

1. 2. Introductory General Course. I, II. 4 hr. per semester. The Introductory 
Course in the Physical Sciences is intended to acquaint the student with the 
physical world in which he lives and has two main objectives: (1) to serve as 
an orientation course for those students who have not chosen their major field 
of interest, and (2) to present a broad general view of the physical sciences 
to students whose interests lie in other fields. 

Two periods each week are devoted to formal lectures and desk demon- 
strations; one period a week is used for discussion and quiz in small groups; 
and one period a week is devoted to laboratory demonstrations, museum dis- 
plays, and field trips. Motion-picture films are used in connection with cer- 
tain phases of the course. The syllabus is designed to give a general view of 
the whole field of the physical sciences as well as serve as a guide for weekly 
lectures, readings, and discussions. 

Students who have successfully completed eight hours of a laboratory 
science in one of the physical science fields (physics, chemistry, geology) can 
not take Physical Science 1 or 2 for credit. Staff 

103. Elements of Modern Science. 3 hr. PR: Any beginning laboratory science 
course. Intended primarily for nonscience majors, this course develops an 
understanding of Science and scientific methods through a study of the develop- 
ment of ideas from early concepts to the present. The illustrative material, 
drawn from the work of outstanding creative scientists, is integrated in such 
a way as to provide the student, not with a series of isolated pictures, but with 
an over-all view of the framework of modern scientific thought and its relation 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 135 

to man in society. The emphasis is not on the technical aspects of science; 
consequently, a knowledge of mathematics beyond intermediate algebra is 
not required. Staff 

150. Modern Scientific Thought. 3 hi. PR: 14 hours of science and consent of 
instructor. Intended for science and philosophy majors, this course under- 
takes a critical analysis of the methodology, epistemology, and basic concepts 
of modern science and particularly of the exact deductive sciences, and it 
aims to develop the intellectual tools in terms of which various philosophical 
interpretations of modern natural science can be evaluated. Staff 

i/jT-i &O0 * IOC I N 

V. COMMUNICATION 

Courses primarily for freshmen: 

English 0. (Communication). Corrective Course. I, II. 3 hr. For students deficient 
in the communication skills, as determined by achievement on entrance tests 
in writing and speaking. Remedial work in laboratory classes. Must be fol- 
lowed by English 1 (Communication) and English 2 (Communication) . 

Mr. Kallsen and Staff 

English 1. (Communication). Basic Course in Composition and Rhetoric. I, II. 
3 hr. Practice in writing, reading, speaking, and listening to expository dis- 
course. Classes organized to emphasize one of the skills according to the needs 
of the students. Special sections are provided for students with no marked 
deficiencies in any of the communications skills, as determined by achievement 
on entrance tests and in performance tests in writing and speaking. 

Mr. Kallsen and Staff 

English 2. (Communication). Basic Course in Composition and Rhetoric. I, II. 3 hr. 
PR: English 1 (Communication). Continuation of English 1 (Communication). 
Practice in critical and argumentative discourse. Consideration of the function 
of language, abuses of logic, and mass communications. Advanced sections 
are provided. Mr. Kallsen and Staff 

Courses primarily for sophomores: 

English 21. (Communication) . The Use of Language. II. 3 hr. PR: English 1 and 
2 or English 1 (Communication) and 2 (Communication). Practice in the 
communication skills on a level more advanced than freshman study. Study of 
the nature of language and its relation to meaning in thought and action. 

Staff 

Courses primarily for upper-division and graduate students: 

English 211. (Communication). Problems of Communication. I. 3 hr. Survey of 
the nature of communication, semantics in clarifying interpersonal communica- 
tion, and responsibilities and social effects of mass communication. Mr. Kallsen 

English 220. (Communication). General Semantics. II. 3 hr. PR: Basic course in 
at least four of the following fields: English, foreign language, physical science, 
biological science, history, psychology, social science, or philosophy and consent 
of instructor. The scientific method and language, the relation between sym- 
bols and reality, the effect of symbols on personal and social conflicts, prac- 
tical devices of written and spoken communication — with continued emphasis 
on practical applications in various fields. Mr. Kallsen 

ART 

Professor Pattox; Assistant Professor Ci arkson and Instructors Aull and Drainer. 

The Department of Art offers technical courses in drawing, painting, and 
design; a nontechnical course in appreciation: and lecture courses in the history of 
the arts. Effort is made to provide for the needs of those interested in the cultural 
aspects of the arts, to meet the requirements of students planning further work of a 
technical nature, and to enable students in Education to meet requirements for 
certification as art teachers. 

For art majors the following lower-division program is lecommended: 



36 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



FIRST 


YEAR 




SECOND 


YEAR 




First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 1 3 


English 2 


3 


English 3 3 


English 4 


3 


Foreign lang. 3 


Foreign lang. 


3 


Foreign lang. 3 


Foreign lang. 


3 


Laboratory sci. 4 


Laboratory sci. 


4 


Humanities 1 4 


Humanities 2 


4 


Art 11 3 


Art 12 


3 


Art 121 3 


Art 122 


3 


Mil. or Air Sci. 1 2 


Art 30 


2 


Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 


Mil. or Air Sci 


4 2 


Phys. educ. 1 


Mil. or Air Sci. 


2 2 


Phys. educ. 1 


Phys. educ. 


1 




Phys. educ. 


1 


Elective 2 


Elective 


2 



16 



18 



18 



18 



Courses of Instruction 

1. Creative Expression in the Fine Arts. I, II, S. 2 hr. Primarily for Elementary 
Education Majors. An exploratory course designed to familiarize the student 
with the possibilities of creative expression through graphic media: to ac- 
quaint the student with the advantages and limitations of the various media; 
and to investigate the adaptability of these to use at various grade levels. 

Miss Drainer 

2. Creative Expression in the Applied Arts. I, II, S. 2 hr. A course similar to 
Art 1 but employing materials such as clay, plasteline, paper, felt, gesso, plaster, 
and the like, as a means of creative expression. Miss Drainer 



Pt or 111, 12 or 112. Representation. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. Freehand drawing 
in pencil and charcoal. Staff 

30_3fe±3!&r Appreciation of the Arts. I ok II. .2 hr. Increasing the student's under- 
standing and enjoyment of the arts; analytical study of selected examples of 
painting, sculpture, and architecture together with sufficient illustrations from 
music and poetry to make clear the basic unity of the arts. Mr. Patton 



„\, 



105, 106. Survey of Art. I. II. 3 hr. per semester. History of art from pre-historic 
times to the present. Offered 1953-54 and alternate years. Mr. Patton 

113, 114. Representation. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: Art 11, 12. Painting. Staff 

115. Representation. I, II. 2 hr. Scientific drawing. Freehand drawing primarily 
for premedical and predental students. Staff 

117, 118. Representation. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: Art. 113, 114. Painting. 

Mr. Patton and Mr. Clarkson 

120. Representation. I or II. 2 hr. PR: Art 11, 12 or consent of instructor. Figure 
drawing. Study of the construction of the figure. Drawing from the draped 
model. Staff 



121, 122 
123 



Fundamentals of Design. I, II. 



hr. per semester. 

Mr. Patton and Mr. Clarkson 
Lettering. I or II. 2 hr. Principles of design involved in lettering and their 
application. Mr. Patton 



126. 



II. 2 hi 



PR: Consent of instructor. Introductory course in 

Mrs. Aull 



127. 



Modeling. 
sculpture. 

Crafts. I or II. 2 hr. Crafts in their relation to the art program in the 
secondary school and to recreation programs. Staff 

151, 152. Special Problems. I, II. 1-3 hr per semester. Staff 

220. Art and the Schools. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: 4 hours of art including a min- 
imum of 2 hr. studio. The function of art in the curriculum at various grade 
levels. Standards of achievement. Methods of integrating art and the other 
subjects. Mr. Patton 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



250. Renaissance Painting. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Art 105 and 106. A study of painting 
in Italy from Cimabue to Tiepolo; the Renaissance in Western Europe; a brief 
consideration of baroque and rococo painting as outgrowths of the renaissance. 
Offered 1952-53 and alternate years. Mr. Patton and Mr. Clarkson 

260. Modern Painting. II. 3 hr. PR: Art 105 and 106. Development of painting 
from the French Revolution to the present day. Offered 1952-53 and alternate 
years. Mr. Patton and Mr. Clarkson 

BIOLOGY 

Professors Core, Anderson, Gribble. Spanci fr, and Tayior: Associate Professor 
Amnions; Assistant Professor Bennett; Instructors Baer, Birch, Daugherty. Smell, 
Smith, and Vandervort. 

Students may select botany or zoology as their major subject. Biology 1 and 
2 or Botany 1 and 2 will be required of students who wish to major in botany. 
Either Biology 1 and 2 or Zoology 1 and 2 will be required of students who elect 
to major in zoology. 

Prospective majors in either botany or zoology should include in their schedule 
of lower-division work Chemistry 1 and 2. Prospective majors in zoology should 
also include Chemistry 15 in lower-division schedule. 

By permission of his adviser the student may select courses offered in other 
colleges and schools of the University in partial fulfillment of the requirements 
for a major subject. 

The following suggested curricula are not to be regarded as specific require- 
ments but will serve as a guide in selection of subjects: 



SUGGESTED CUF 


tRIC 


ULUM FOR THE A.B, 


. DEGREE WITH A 


MAJOR IN BOTANY 


Freshman Hr. 


Sophomore Hr. 


Junior Hr. 


Senior Hr, 


Bot. 1 and 2 or 




Foreign lang. 6 


Bot. 231, 232 8 


Botany 273 4 


Biol. 1 and 2 


8 


Physics 1 and 2 6 


Botany 235 3 


Botany 261, 262 6 


English 


6 


Syst. Bot. 4 


Botany 221 4 


Botany 227 4 


Foreign lang. 


6 


Physics 3 and 4 2 


Biology 211 3 


Biology 205 3 


Chem. 1 and 2 


8 


Electives 10 


Genetics 221 3 


Bot. Seminar 2 


Phys. educ. 


o 


Mil. or Air Sci. 4 


Bact. 141 4 


Botany 255 2 


Mil. or Air Sci. 


4 




Elect i vps 8 


Electives 11 



34 



32 



33 



32 



SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE A.B. DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN ZOOLOGY 



Freshman 


Hr. 


Sophomore 


Hr. 


Junior & Senior 


Hr. 


Zoology 1 and 2 or 
Biol. 1 and 2 


8 


Foreign lang. 
Mil. or Air Sci. 


6 

4 


Genetics 221 
Chem. 233 and 238 


3 

8 


English 
Foreign lang. 
Chem. 1 and 2 


6 
6 

8 


Physics 1 and 2 
Physics 3 and 4 
Chem. 15 


6 
2 

3 


Zool. and Biol. 
Upper-division 
courses, minimum 


18 


Phys. educ. 


2 


Electives 


11 


Electives 


36 


Mil. or Air Sci. 


4 











34 



32 



65 



Courses of Instruction 
biology 

Lower Division 
1, 2. General Biology. I, II. 4 



hr. 



S/ 



in Biology. 

A1 IC(\Q ^ 10 L 



per semester 



General Introductory course 
Mr. Bennett and Staff 



138 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Upper Division 

201, 202. Btqiqcv ih/Humam AfjAiKS . I, II. 2 hr per semester. PR: Biology 2 or 
equivalent. A review of the various aspects of general biology, with particular 
emphasis upon their relation to the life of man. ^, Staff 

205. Principles of Evolution. I. 3 hr. PR: Biology 2, Botany 2, or Zoology 2. 
Offered in 1952-53 and alternate years thereafter. , Mr. Bennett 

207. History of Biology. II. 3 hr. PR: Biology 2. Offered in 1953-54 and alter- 
nate years. Mr. Core 

208. Great Texts in Biology. II. 1 hr. PR: Biology 2 or equivalent. A study of 
some of the great classics in biology, such as Theophrastus' Enquiry into Plants, 
Vesalius' Epitome, Harvey's Circulation of the Blood, Darwin's Origin of 
Species, and Mendel's Experiments on Hybrid Plants. Mr. Core 

209. The Literature of Biology. I. 1 hr. PR: Biology 2 or equivalent. A con- 
sideration of the sources and forms of the literature, the development of 
bibliographies, and the preparation of scientific papers. Mr. Core 

211. B iological Technique . I. 3 hr. PR: Biology 2, Botany 2 or Zoology 2, or 
equivalent. Theory and practice of making microscopic preparations, etc. 
Primarily for botany and zoology majors. Miss Daugherty 

215. Cytology. II. 4 hr. PR: Biology 2. Cells, their structure and functions. 

Mr. Bennett 

273, 274. General and Comparative Physiology. I, II. 4 hr. per semester. PR: 
Biology 2, Botany 2, or Zoology 2. A consideration of the functions common 
to all forms of living matter. Mr. Anderson 

Graduate Division 

301, 302. Seminar. I, II. 1 hr. per semester. Topics of interest to all biologists are con- 
sidered. All members of the staff and graduate students contribute by the 
presentation of a report on some scientific activity. Required of all graduate 
students. Staff members and students in other departments are invited to 
attend. Staff 

311. Advanced Microtechnique. II. 1-3 hr. PR: Biology 211 and consent of instructor. 

Miss Daugherty 

321, 322. Seminar in Ecology. I, II. 2 hr. per semester. PR: Botany 221 or Zoology 
221 and consent. Selected topics on relations of organisms to environment 
and on communities or organisms. Staff 

376, 377. Seminar in General Physiology. I, II. 2 hr. per semester. PR: Biology 
274, Botany 273, Zoology 271, or Plant Pathology 330, and consent. Selected 
topics on functions common to all organisms. Staff 

BOTANY 

Lower Division 

1, 2. General Botany. I, II. 4 hr. per semester. A general survey of the plant 
kingdom. • Miss Ammons and Staff 

61. Systematic Botany. I. 2 hr. Identification of seed plants. Primarily for 
students in Forestry. Mr. Core 

67, 68. Dendrology. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: Biology 2. Classification and 
distribution of the timber trees of the United States. Primarily for students 
in Forestry. Mr. Core 

71. Plant Physiology. II. 2 hr. Physico-chemical processes of plants. Primarily 
for students in Forestry. Mr. Baer 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 139 



Upper Division/ ' 

+03% Botany in Human Affairs. I. 3 hr. PR: Biology 2 or equivalent. The dif- 

Tereftt-aspects of botany as related to their bearing on the life of man. 

T///L / /.A/V'7" V ~ri^s • Mrs. Vandervort 

161. Systematic Botany. II. 4 hr. Identification of seed plants and study ot their 

classification. Mr. Core 

201, 202. Seminar. 1,11. 1 hr. per semester. Topics of interest to all students of 
plants are considered. Staff 

218. Economic Botany. II. 3 hr. PR: Biology 2 or Botany 2. Plants from the 
standpoint of their value to man. Offered in 1953-54 and alternate years 
thereafter. Mr. Core 

221. Plant Ecology. I. 4 hr. PR: Biology 2 or Botany 2. Environmental rela- 
tionships of plants. Mr. Baer 

224. Plant Communities. S. 2 hr. PR: Biology 2 or equivalent. Field studies in 
Ecology. Offered in 1954 and every third year thereafter. Mr. Baer 



i 






27. Geographic Botany. I. $*r. PR: Botany 2 or Biology 2. Study of plant 
groupings and worldwide distribution of plants. Offered in 1953-54 and alter- 
nate years. Mr. Core 

229. Field Studies in Botany. SI. 6 hr. PR: Botany 2 or equivalent. Primarily 
for botany majors and to meet the needs of those who intend to teach or are 
teaching botany. Studies will be conducted in various, interesting regions of 
the State; the entire time will be spent in the field. Aims to familiarize 
students with plant life of the State in its natural conditions. (Further 
information will be found in the Summer Session bulletin and in special 
announcements.) Mr. Bennett 

231. Plant Morphology. I. 4 hr. PR: Biology 2 or Botany 2. Development and 
structure of algae and fungi. Mr. Spangler 

232. Plant Morphology. II. 4 hr. PR: Biology 2 or Botany 2. Development and 
structure of bryophytes and vascular plants. Mr. Spangler 

235. Plant Anatomy. I. 3 hr. PR: Botany 2 or equivalent. Anatomy of seed 
plants. Miss Ammons 

255. Bryophytes. II. 2 hr. PR: Botany 2 or Biology 2. Identification of liver- 
worts and mosses. Miss Ammons 

261. Advanced Systematic Botany. I. 3 hr. PR: Botany 161 or equivalent. 
Taxonomy of pteridophytes, gymnosperms and monocotyledons. Offered in 
1952-53 and alternate years thereafter. Mr. Core 

262. Advanced Systematic Botany. II. 3 hr. PR: Botany 161 or equivalent. 
Taxonomy of dicotyledons. Offered in 1952-53 and alternate years thereafter. 

Mr. Core 

265. Aquatic Seed Plants. S. 3 hr. PR: Biology 2 or equivalent. Classification, 

ecology and economic importance of aquatic seed plants. Mr. Bennett 

2 f of (/. i ' / 

273. Plant Physiology. I. 4 hr. PR: Biology 2 or Botany 2, and Chemistry 1 and 

2 or equivalent. Physico-chemical processes of plants. Mr. Baer 

Graduate Division 

325. Experimental Ecology. II. 4 hr. PR: Biology 1, Botany 161, and Botany 221 
or equivalents. Experiments on environmental relations of plants. Mr. Baer 

351, 352. Problems in Plant Taxonomy. I, II. 1-6 hr. PR: Botany 261, 262, or 
equivalent. Mr. Core 



x. 



n J - • u 






140 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



374. Advanced Plant Physiology. II. 4 hr. PR: Botany 273 or equivalent; also 
courses in general physics and organic chemistry. Advanced studies of plant 
processes and physiological methods. Mr. Baer 

391, 392, 393, 394. Research. I. II. 1-6 hr. Staff 

ZOOLOGY 

Lower Division 

1, 2. General Zoology. I, II. 4 hr. Pacts and principles fundamental to an 

understanding of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Designed for pre- 

medical students and prospective majors in zoology. Students who have 

taken Biology 1 or 2 may not register in this course. Mr. Taylor and Staff 

3. Elementary Zoology. II. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 1. Introduction to animal biology. 
Registration restricted to students in Agriculture. Mr. Taylor and Staff 

31. Human Anatomy. I. 4 hr. General anatomv for nurses. Mr. Gribble 






Upper Division 

171. Human Physiology. II. 4 hi. An introductory course on the functions of 
man. Mr. Anderson and Staff 

210. Animal Behavior. I. £ hr. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. Principles of in- 
dividual and group behavior. Offered in 1952-53 and alternate years there- 
after. Mr. Taylor 

221. Animal Ecology. I. 3 hr. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. Relations between 
animals and their environment with emphasis on communities of living organ- 
isms. Offered in 1953-54 and alternate vears thereafter. Mr. Taylor 

229. Field Zoology. SI. 6 hr. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. Observation, col- 
lection and identification of West Virginia animals. A six weeks' bus and 
camping trip offers facilities for investigating varied areas of biological interest. 
(Further information will be found in the Summer Session bulletin and in 
special announcements.) Mr. Taylor 

231. Comparative Anatomy. I. 5 hr. PR: Zool. 2 or equivalent. Organs and systems 
of various vertebrates, together with other facts of interest concerning these 
animals. Mr. Gribble and Miss Smith 

232. Vertebrate Embryology. II. 5 hr. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. Intro- 
ductory study of development of vertebrates, based chiefly on frogs, fowl and 
mammals. Mr. Gribble and Miss Smith 

233. Comparative Histology. II. 3 hr. PR: Zoology 231 and 232. A comparative 
study of the tissues of the vertebrates. Miss Smith 

235. Comparative Developmental Anatomy. II. 3 hr. PR: Zoology 231. Anatomy 
and development of the organs and svstems of various vertebrates. 

Mr. Gribble 

236. Comparative Neuroanatomy. II. 2 hr. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. Com- 
parative study of development and anatomy of the nervous systems of the 
vertebrates. Mr. Gribble 

237. Osteology. I. 2 hr. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. Development and anat- 
omy of the skeleton. Miss Smith 

251. Invertebrate Zoology. I. 4 hr. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. Advanced 
study of animals without backbones. Mr. Birch 

255. Introduction to Human Parasitology. II. 4 hr. PR: Zoology 2 or equiva- 
lent. Biological aspects of parasites and other animals of medical importance. 

Mr. Taylor 



HE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 141 



265. Ornithology. II. 4 hr. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent, and permission of 
instructor. Field and laboratory studies on identification, migration, pro- 
tection, nesting and food habits of birds. Mr. Birch 

271. Physiology of Domestic Animals. I. 4 hr. PR: Zoology 2 or equivalent. 
The functions of domestic animals. Mr. Anderson 

Graduate Division 

331. Mammalian Anatomy. S. 3 hr. PR: Zoology 231, 232, 233, 235, 236 and 237 
and consent of instructor. The study of the anatomy of selected animals from 
the regional and sectional approach. Offered 1953 and every third year. 

Mr. Gribble 

332. Anatomy of the Integument. I. 2 hr. PR: Zoology 231, 232, 233 and 235 
and consent of instructor. An advanced study of the gross, developmental, 
comparative, and microscopic anatomy of the integument and its derivatives. 
Offered 1952-53 and every third year. Mr. Gribble 

334. Anatomy of the Circulatory and Respiratory Systems. II. 3 hr. PR: 
Zoology 231, 232, and 235 and consent of instructor. An advanced study of 
the gross, developmental, and comparative anatomy of the circulatory and 
respiratory systems. Offered 1952-53 and every third year. Mr. Gribble 

335. Anatomy of the Urogenital System. I. 3 hr. PR: Zoology 231, 232, and 235 
and consent of instructor. An advanced study of the gross, developmental 
and comparative anatomy of the genital and urinary systems. Offered 1953-54 
and every third year. Mr. Gribble 

336. Advanced Comparative Neuroanatomy. II. 3 hr. PR: Zoology 231, 232, 233 
and 236 and consent of instructor. An advanced study of the gross, micro- 
scopic, developmental, and comparative anatomy of the nervous system. Of- 
fered 1953-54 and every third year. Mr. Gribble 

337. Advanced Osteology. S. 3 hr. PR: Zoology 231 and 237 and consent of 
instructor. The study of the gross, microscopic, developmental, and com- 
parative anatomy of the skeleton. Offered 1954 and every third year. 

Mr. Gribble 

338. Analogies and Homologies. I. 3 hr. PR: Zoology 231, 232, 233, 235, 236, 237, 
331, 334, 335, 336, and 337 and consent of instructor. A detailed study of the 
analogies and homologies as found in the vertebrates. Offered 1954-55 and 
every third year. Mr. Gribble 

339. Anomalies and Variations. II. 3 hr. PR: Zoology 231, 232, 233, 235, 236, 
237, 331, 334, 335, 336, 337, and 338 and consent of instructor. A detailed study 
of the types, causes, results and frequency of vertebrate anatomical and devel- 
opmental anomalies and variations. Offered in 1954-55 and every third year. 

Mr. Gribble 
351. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Zoology 251 and consent. 

Mr. Birch 
391, 392, 393, 394. Research. I, II. 1-6 hr. Staff 

396, 397. Special Topics. I, II. 1-3 hr. per semester. Critical studies of topics to 
be determined according to the student's requirements. Staff 

CHEMISTRY 

Professors Lazzell, Collett, Dustman and Gibson; Associate Professor J. L. Hall; 
Assistant Professors G. A. Hall, Hickman, Humphrey, Husflton, Iffland, Muth, 
Pursglove, and Wilson; Instructors Miller and Popovich. 

Chemistry 1 and 2 are prerequisite to all courses in chemistry. Chemistry 
5, 6, 233, 238, 260, and 261; Mathematics2* 107 and 108; minimum one year of 

24lf mathematics is elected as a minor, an additional 3-hour course beyond 
calculus (usually Differential Equations) is required. 



142 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



physics 2 ^ are required of candidates for the A.B. degree who major in chemistry. 

Students entering the University with intention of studying chemistry as a 
profession leading to a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, with major in 
chemistry, should take Mathematics 3 and Chemistry 1 during the first semester of 
their first year. 

A deposit is required of all students who take laboratory courses. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry Degree are essentially 
the same as the requirements lor the Bachelor of Arts Degree with the major 
in chemistry for all nonchemical courses. The distinction lies mainly in the extra 
chemistry (elective) requirements, and an additional 6 hours of a second language 
above that required for the A.B. Degree. 



Freshman 


Hr. 


Sophomore 


Hr. 


Junior 


Hr. 


Senior Hr. 


Chem. 1 & 2 


8 


Chem. 5 


4 


Chem. 233 




5 


Chem. 260. d 


English 


6 


Chem. 6 


5 


Chem. 238 




5 


Chem. 261 5 


Foreign lang. 


6 


Math. 5 


4 


Math. 108 




4 


Chem. Eng. 234, 


Mathematics 3 


3 


Foreign lang. 


6 


Physics 105, 






235 4 


Mathematics 4 


3 


Math. 107 


4 


107 




5 


Chem. electives 8 


Electives 


2 


Electives (not 




Phvsics 106, 






Other electives 11 


Phys. educ. 


2 


chemistry) 


8 


108 




5 




Mil. or Air Sci 


4 


Mil. or Air Sci 


4 


Chem. Eng. 


200 


2 












Chem. electives 


4 












Other electives 


4 





34 
Courses of Instruction 2<5 



35 



34 



33 



Lower Division 

1. Inorganic Chemistry. I, II. 4 hr. Required of all students whose work 
calls for the first year of chemistry. Elective for others. Primarily for 
freshmen. Staff 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 1. Required of all students whose 
work calls for first year of chemistry. Elective for others. Primarily for 
freshmen. Staff 



105. Qualitative Analysis. I. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 2. Required of stu- 
dents whose major is chemistry, and pharmacy students. 2 lect. and 2 3-hour 
lab. periods. Mr. Gibson and Miss Wilson 

ft^wr 106. Quantitive Analysis.. II. 4-5 hr. PR: Chem. 2. Chemistry 5 should 
precede this course wherever possible. Required of students whose major is 
chemistry. Mr. Gibson and Miss Wilson 

8. Qualitative Analysis. S. 2 hr. PR: Chem. 1 and 2. Given in Summer Session 
only for engineering students. Staff 

10. Quantitative Analysis. I. 2 hr. PR: Chem. 2. Primarilv for engineering 
students. Mr. Huselton 

•itKKt 115. Quantitative Analysis. I. II. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 2. For premedical, 
chemical engineering and pharmacy students. 

Mr. Humphrey and Mr. Huselton 

25Physics 105, 106, 107, and 108 may count as a minor. If Physics 1, 2, 3 and 4 
are offered, nine additional upper-division hours in physics are required to satisfy 
the minor. 

26Chemistry 1 and 2 are prerequisite to all other courses in chemistry. Three- 
year and four-year premedical students are referred to page 22 for outline of 
required courses. For courses in biochemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry see 
those sections. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 143 

*- 131. Organic Chemistry. I. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 2. For students in agri- 
culture and home economics. Mr. Dustman 

163. Physical Chemistry. I. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 2. Required of premedical 
students and recommended for geologv majors and non-chemistry majors. 

Mr. G. A. Hall 

Upper Division 

107. Quantitative Analysis. II. 2 hr. Continuation of Chemistry 15 and 115. 

Miss Wilson 
111. Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry. I. 4 hr. PR. Chemistry 6 or 106. Mr. Hickman 

141, 143. Assigned Topics. I. 1-5 hr. PR: Approval of instructor. Staff 

142, 144. Assigned Topics. II. 1-5 hr. PR: Approval of instructor. Staff 

162. The Chemistry of Colloids. II. 4 hr. Elective for four-year premedical 
students. Mr. G. A. Hall 

170. Glass Working for the Chemical Laboratory. II. 2 hr. PR: Chemistry 
major or approval of instructor. Mr. Iffland 

208. Quantitative Analysis. I. 3 hr. PR: Chemistry 6, (5 hr.) , Physics 4 or 106 
and 108, and Mathematics 5. Mr. Gibson 

214. Qualitative Organic Analysis. I. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 238. Miss Wilson 

215. Quantitative Organic Analysis. II. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 238. Miss Wilson 

233. Organic Chemistry. I, II. 4-5 hr. PR: Chemistry 6 or 15. Required of 
students who major in chemistrv, pre-med., chemical and mining engineering. 

Mr. Lazzell and Mr. Iffland 
238. Organic Chemistry. I, II. 4-5 hr. PR: Chem. 233. 

Mr. Lazzell and Mr. Iffland 
247. Stereochemistry. I. 2 hr. Open to seniors. PR: Chem 238. Mr. Iffland 

260. Physical Chemistry. I. 4-5 hr. PR: Chemistry 233, Physics 2 and 4 or 106 
and 108, and Mathematics 108. Required of chemistry majors and chemical 
engineering students, the latter for 4 hours credit. Mr. Collett 

261. Physical Chemistry. II. 4-5 hr. PR: Chemistry 260. Required of chemical 
engineering students and chemistry majors. Mr. Collett 

273. Chemical Literature. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Chem. 6 and 238. Open to seniors. 

Mr. Hickman 

274. History of Chemistry. II. 2 hr. PR: Chem. 6 or equivalent, and organic 
chemistry. Mr. Pursglove 

275. Modern Chemical Theories and Practices. S. 2 hr. PR: 16 hours of chem- 
istry. Primarilv a refresher course for high school teachers. Not for graduate 
chemistry majors. Mr. J. L. Hall and Mr. Hickman 

277. Synthetic Drugs. I or II. 2 hr. PR: Chemistry 238 or equivalent. 

Mr. Pursglove 

Graduate Division 

301. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. I. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 261. Mr. Popovich 

302. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. II. 3 hr. PR: Chem 301. Mr. Popovich 

317. Modern Plastics. I or II. 3 hr. Mr. Muth 

343. Advanced Org nic Chemistry. I. 4 hr. PR: Chemistry 238 or equivalent. 

Mr. Lazzell 



144 



CI RRK TLA AM) COURSES 



345. 
350. 
367. 
368. 
369. 
379. 

380. 
383. 



389. 



Theories of Okganic Chemistry. II. 2 hr. PR: Chemistry 343. Mr. Lazzell 

Heterocyclic Chemistry. II. 2 hr. PR: Chem. 343. Mr. Muth 

Advanced Phys'cai Chemistry. II. 2-4 hr. PR: Chemistry 261. Mr. J. L. Hall 

Advanced Physical Chemistry. I. 2 hr. PR: Chem. 367. Mr. J. L. Hall 

Chemical Kinetics. I or II. 2 hr. PR: Chem. 261. Mr. G. A. Hall 



Seminar in Coal Research. -L-4L 
semester, maximum credit 2 hours 
and the U.S. Bureau of Mines. 

Electrochemistry I or II. 3 hr. 

Advanced Quantitative Analysis. 



1 or 2 hr. PR: Consent. Credit 1 hour per 
. In cooperation with other departments 

PR: Chemistry 238 and 261. Mr. Collett 



I or II. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 208, 238, 261. 

Mr. Gibson 
Valence and Molecular Structure. 2" I or II. 2 hr. PR: Mathematics 108, 
Physics 108, Chemistry 261. Mr. Gibson 



Chemical Thermodynamics. 2« 
108. 



I. 2 hr. 



PR: Chemistry 261 and Mathematics 
Mr. Gibson 



390. Chemical Thermodynamics. 28 II. 2 hr. Continuation of Chem 389. 

Mr. Gibson 

391, 392. Journal Meeting and Seminar. I, II. 1 hr. per semseter. Required 

of students working for graduate degrees with major in chemistry. Recom 
mended as a minor for students from other departments. Staff 

395, 396. Special Topics. I, II. 1-3 hr. per semester. Chemistry of the carbo- 
hydrates, organic nitrogen compounds, the phase rule, dyes and dye inter- 
mediates, food analysis, chemical microscopy, and crystallography are suggested 
topics. Staff 



397, 398, 399. 



Research. I, II. 1-10 hr. Six hours required for the Master's Degree. 

Staff 



CLASSICS 

Professor Brouzas 

The Department of Classics offers courses in the Greek and Latin languages 
and in classical civilization. Courses in the department are intended not only to 
give students a thorough knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages and literatures 
but also to acquaint them with the classical culture in general. A student with 
major in Latin should plan to include at least 6 hours of Greek in his course, 
preferably in the sophomore year. 

Courses suggested for classics majors with English as a second teaching field 
for certification in West Virginia: 



FIRST 


YEAR 




SECOND 


YEAR 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


English 1 3 


English 2 


3 


English 65 2 9 


3 


Journalism 15 29 3 


English 3 2 9 3 


English 4 2 9 


3 


Latin 


3 


Latin 3 


Latin (according 


Latin 


3 


Greek 1 


3 


Greek 2 3 


to preparation) 3 


Laboratory sci. 


4 


Sociology or 




Sociology or 


Laboratory sci. 4 


Phvs. educ. 


1 


economics 


3 


economics 3 


Phys. educ. 1 


Electives 


2 


Electives 


3 


Speech 2s 3 


Electives 2 






Physical educ. 


1 


Electives 2 


16 




16 




16 


17 



2TOffered in alternate years, not available in 1953-54. 
2sOffered in alternate years, available in 1953-54. 

29Students wishing- to offer social science for certification may substitute his- 
tory for this course. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 145 

Courses of Instruction 

Lower Division 

1. Elementary Latin. I. 3 hr. Elements of the Latin language. Completion 
of a standard beginner's book, 

2. Elementary Latin. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Latin 1, consisting of study 
of a standard second-year book. 

3. Intermediate Latin. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 2 or two units of high-school Latin. 
Selections from Caesar, Aulus Gellius, Nepos, and from other authors of 
comparable ease, designed to prepare students to read orations of Cicero 
and other Latin of similar difficulty. 

4. Cicero's Orations. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 3, or 2 units of high-school Latin. 

5. Latin for Law Students: Selections from Legal Latin and the Institutes 
of Justinian. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 3 or 2 units of high-school Latin. 

12. Selections from Roman Prose. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 4 and 6 or equivalent. 

Cato to the end of the Silver Latin period. 
/-/. /f<2MAA/ / J ~ 

21. Roman Letterwriting. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 4 and 12, or 4 units of high- 
school Latin. 

22. Selections from Roman Poetry. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 4 and 12. or equivalent. 
Selections from the elegaic, lyric, and iambic poets and from Martial's epigrams. 

23. Livy and Cicero. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 14 and 21, or equivalent. Selections 
Livy books 21 and 22; Cicero's De Senectute or De Amicitia. 



. The Lyr 



24. The Lyric and Bucolic Poets. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 4 and 12. or equivalent. 
Selections from Horace's Odes and Epodes: from Catullus and other poets; 
selections from the Bucolics of Vergil and Calpurnius. 

25. Latin Composition. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 12 and 22. or equivalent. A review 
of the principles and syntax of the Latin language, and practice in writing 
simple Tatin. 

Upper Division 

130. Leadership in Classical Club. II. 2 hr. PR: Four years of high-school Latin 
or-twelve hours of Latin taken in college. Materials for enriching, vivifying 
and— making Latin concrete; Latin posters, scrap books, Latin derivatives in 
English and modern languages, Latin playlets, Latin mottoes, proverbs, 
mythological allusions, etc. Offered every other year. Approved for high- 
school certification in co-curricular activity. 

201. The Story and Novel. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 12 and 22, or equivalent. The 
origin of the story and novel is traced from Homer to the medieval Greek 
and Latin romance writers. Selections from Petronius, the Cena Trimalchionis, 
and from Apuleius, Cupid and Psyche. 

202. Drama. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 12 and 22, or equivalent. A brief history of the 
origin and development of Greek and Roman drama. The Menaechmi of 
Plautus. the Andria of Terence, and the Medea of Seneca are read in Latin. 

203. Oratory. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 12 and 22, or equivalent. A bird's eye view of 
Greek and Roman oratory is given and part of the first book of Cicero's De 
Oratore; selections from Quintilian's Institutes and from Tacitus' Dialogus 
de Oratoribus are read in Latin. 

227. Vulgar Latin— Prosf and Verse. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 12 and 22, or equivalent. 
Selections from Latin inscriptions with a view to studying the development 



146 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



of the Latin language from its earliest times; also selections from medieval 
and later Latin writers are read which show the passing of the Latin language 
into the Romance languages. 

231. Satire. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 12 and 22, or equivalent. Greek satirical writings 
and the origin of the Roman satire. Selections in Latin from the Satires and 
Epistles of Horace, and from the Satires of Persius and Juvenal. 

234. History. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 12 and 22, or equivalent. The origin and develop- 
ment of Roman historiography and its Greek antecedents. Selections in Latin 
from Livy's History, from Tacitus' Agricola, and from Suetonius' Julius 
Caesar. 

235. Epic. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 12 and 22, or equivalent. The origin and development 
of the Greek and Roman epic. Selections from Vergil's Aeneid, from Lucretius' 
De Rerum Xatura, and from the earlier and later epic poets in Latin. 

236. Philosophy. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 12 and 22, or equivalent. The origin and 
development of Greek Philosophy and its influence upon Roman philosophy. 
Selections from Cicero's Tusculan Disputations on the immortality of the 
soul and from Seneca's Dialogues and Epistles in Latin. 

Graduate Division 

381, 382. Seminar. Introduction to Research. I, II. 3 hr. each semester. PR: 
at least three courses of upper division Latin, or equivalent. Methods of 
textual, literary, and historical criticism. Evaluation of text, sources, and 
background of an author, whose principal work is studied and analyzed. 

383, 384. Thesis. I, II. 3 hr. each semester. Six hours of credit are allowed for 
a thesis, required for the degree of Master of Arts in the department. A con- 
troversial subject, or a little explored subject is usually assigned, intended 
not only to acquaint students with the subject-matter and to develop the 
various sides of research method but also to produce a creditable piece of 
research. 

CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

Upper Division 

237. G rffk and Roman Religion and Art. I. 3 hr. A studv of the Greek and 
Roman religious ideas and myths, with particular emphasis on their influence 
upon the art and literature of the ancient and the modern world. 

239. Greek and Roman Life and Thought. I. 3 hr. A survey of Greek and Roman 
culture and thought as reflected in classical literature. Selections from Greek 
and Latin literatures in translation. 

GREEK 

Lower Division 

1. Elementary Greek. I. 3 hr. A course in the elements of the Greek language. 

2. Selections from Grfek Lttfraturf ('Prose). II. 3 hi. 

3. Selections from Grffk I.itfratirf ('Poetry) . II. 3 hr. 

4. Selections from Hfilfmsiig and Biblical Grffk Litrraturf. I. 3 hv. 

">. Selections from Medieval and Modern Greek Literarure. II. 3 hr. 

Note: A student who knows modern Greek well, may, upon the completion 
at the University of Greek 1 and 2, apply for advanced standing in Greek 4 and 5. 
A special examination will be given, and credit allowed shall not exceed three 
semester hours for each course. 




THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 147 

ECONOMICS 

Professors Coleman, Fishman and Tower; Associate Professor Roberts; Assistant 
Professors Campbell, Hanczaryk, Somers and Thompson (adviser). 

The academic year 1952-53 brought into existence a new College of Commerce that 
was formed from the old Department of Economics and Business of the College of 
Arts and Sciences. The new College of Commerce grants the B.S. degree, with 
Economics as a major. The College of Arts and Sciences continues to grant the 
A.B. Degree with a major in Economics. 

Enrollment for the A.B. Degree affords the student an opportunity for fundamental 
training in the field of Economics while at the same time affording opportunity for 
broad, general training in other fields. Thirty or more credit hours, from a total of 
128 required for graduation, are available for elective subjects. 

Courses of Instruction 

The department offers courses leading to the A.B. Degree with a major in 
Economics. 

A candidate for either degree must complete a minimum of 128 college hours for 
graduation. He must also complete a minimum of 24 upper-division hours in the 
Department. In no instance will undergraduate credit be given for more than 40 
college hours, including lower-division courses, in Economics. Candidates must com- 
plete a minimum of 52 college hours at the upper-division level. Of these, a minor 
field of not less than 9 upper-division hours, approved by the candidate's adviser, 
must be earned in a department other than Economics. 

Lower-Division Program. The curriculum of the lower division is designed to 
provide a background for the study of Economics. The following courses are required 
and students are expected to complete them within the first two years of residence 
at the University. 

FIRST YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

Foreign Languages" 3 Foreign Languages' 3 

History 1 or Humanities 1 3 or 4 Laboratory Science^ 4 

Laboratory Science ! 4 History 2 or Humanities 2 3 or 4 

Physical education 1 Physical education 1 

Mil. or Air Sci. 1 2 Mil. or Air Sci. 2 2 



16 or 17 16 or 17 



SECOND YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Economics 1 3 Economics 2 3 

Foreign language 3 Foreign language 3 

Pol. Sci. 5 or History 52 3 Pol. Sci. 106 or History 53 3 

Elective 3 Public Speaking 11 3 

Mathematics 8 3 Elective 3 

Mil. or Air Sci. 3 2 Mil. or Air Sci. 4 2 

Maximum hours allowed 17 17 

Upper -Division Program. The following courses are required of all Economics 
majors: 

111. Money and Banking 

■<oSee language requirements for College of Arts and Sciences. 
siA laboratory science may be chosen from biology, chemistry, physics, 
botany, zoology, psychology, geology, or physical science. 



148 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



115. Labor Problems 

125. Statistics 

221. Economic Theory 

222. History of Economic Thought 

In addition to the above courses, candidates must complete a minimum of 9 
upper division hours in Economics. 

Courses of Instruction 

Lower Division 

1. Principles of Economics. 3 hr. 

2. Principles of Economics. 3 hr. 

Upper Division 

111. Money and Banking. 3 hr. 

115. Labor Problems. 3 hr. 

116. History of Labor in U. S. 3 hr. 

119. Economics of Consumption. 3 hr / 6ow\ 1 

125. Statistics. 3 hr. 

■: c: ; iaLLj Iu :uLiLliLL 3 hi s /^. z 

209. Problems in Economics. 1-3 hr. 

210. Comparative Economic Systems. 3 hr. 

217. Trade Unionism. 3 hr. 

218. Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations. 3 In. 

221. Economic Theory. 3 hr. 

222. History of Economic Thought. 3 hr. 
225. Transportation. 3 hr. 

230. Public Utilities. 3 hr. 

235. Business Cycles. 3 hr. 

241. Public Finance. 3 hr. 

242. Taxation. 3 hr. 

245. Government and Business. 3 hr. 
250. International Trade. 3 hr. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors Brawner (Chairman), Bishop, Crocker, and Draper: Associate Professors 
Foster and Gainer; Assistant Professors Mockler, Page, Pettigrew, Reed, and 
Sayre; Instructors Board, Buswell. Casey, Dawson, Dowdell. Emley, Greet, 
Hicks, R. Holden, S. Holden, Howard, Law, Leonian, Marks, Ross, Spangler, 
and Taylor. 

A student who is admitted to the upper-division of the University may be 
admitted to the Department of English as a major on consultation with the depart 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



149 



mental adviser. No absolute prerequisites, except freshman English and other 
lower-division Arts and Sciences requirements, are stated as conditions of admission: 
but it is desired that students who anticipate becoming English majors should be 
guided by the suggested lower-division programs listed below. If a student on entrance 
into the upper-division presents deficiencies in English credits, he will be expected 
to take additional work during his junior and senior years. 

Advisers of upper-division students who are not English majors may schedule 
them for upper-division courses in English without regard to prerequisites, according 
to the advisers' discretion. 

Teacher Certification for English Majors 

A student may meet the requirements for the A.B. Degree with a major in English 
and at the same time qualify for teacher certification. Those who wish to pursue 
this plan will first complete the requirements of the basic two-year curriculum as 
prescribed for teacher trainees. During their junior and senior years, the courses 
that are required in their major and minor subjects will largely coincide with those 
required for first and second teaching fields for high-school teachers. At the same 
time they will complete the required work in Education as prescribed in the teacher- 
training program. 

Students who desire to meet these combined requirements will need to plan their 
study programs very carefully. To avoid loss of time, they should signify their 
interest in teacher certification as early in their college course as possible. 

Lower Division: 

The following lower-division course programs are suggested (not required) for 
pre-English majors. Students preparing to teach will be advised on the correlation 
of these suggestions with the two-year general course program required of them. 



First Sem. 

English 1 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Lab. Science 4 

English 3 or 5 3 

Mil. or Air Sci. 2 

Phys. Ed. 1 



FIRST YEAR 
Hr. Second Sem. 



SECOND YEAR 



Hr. 

English 2 3 

Foreign Language 3 
Lab. Science 4 

English 4 or 6 3 
Mil. or Air Sci. 2 
Phys. Ed. 1 



First Sem. 



Hr. Second Sem. 



English 3 or 5 3 
Foreign Language 3 

(if needed) 
English 13* 2 

History 52 3 

Electives** 3-6 

Mil. or Air Sci. 2 
Phvs. Ed. 1 



Hr. 



English 4 or 6 3 
Foreign Language 3 

(if needed) 

History 53 3 

Mil. or Air Sci. 2 

Phys. Ed. 1 

Electives 6-9 



16 



16 



17 



18 



*Or equivalent course. (For sophomores, English 9, 14, 16, 17, or 18: for 
juniors, English 115 or 125.) 

**To prepare for a minor subject, or to satisfy requirements of the teacher- 
training program. 



Upper Division: 

A student admitted to the upper division in English may choose either of two 
majors: Major in English Literature; Major in English and American Literature. 

I. The program of a Major in English Literature will include the following: 

A. Specific Requirements: 

1. English 142. Shakespeare. 3 hr. 

2. English 234. Chaucer. 3 hr. 

3. English 230. History of the English Language, 3 hr.; or 
English 127. The American Language. 2 hr. 

B. Nine hours to be chosen from the following courses: 

1. English 138. English Literature, 1660-1744. 3 hr. 

2. English 139. English Literature, 1744-1798. 3 hr. 



150 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



S. English 140. Elizabethan Poetry and Prose. 3 hr. 

4. English 141. Literature of the 17th Century. 3 hr. 

5. English 249. The Romantic Movement. 3 hr. 

6. English 257. Victorian Poetry. 3 hr. 

7. English 258. Victorian Prose. 3 hr. 

C. Three hours to be chosen from the 100 and 200 course offerings in American 
literature (English 166, 222, 239, 240, 241, 250, 270). 

II. The program of a Major in English and American Literature will include the 
following: 

A. Specific Requirements: 

1. English 142 

2. English 234 

3. English 230 or 127 

B. Nine hours to be chosen from 100 and 200 course offerings in American 
literature (English 166, 222, 239, 240, 241, 250, 270). 

C. Three hours to be chosen from courses 138, 139, 140, 141, 249, 257, and 258, 
as listed under I, B. 

Courses of Instruction 

Lower Division 

O. English Composition.. 1,11. 3 hr. Required of all students who fail to 
qualify for English 1 on the Freshman English placement test. Staff 

1. Composition and Rhetoric. I, II. 3 hr. Required of all candidates for the 
Bachelor's Degree in all colleges. Advanced sections are provided for students 
who make exceptionally high grades on the Freshman English placement test. 

Staff 

2. Composition and Rhetoric. I, II. 3 hr. Continuation of English 1. Required 
of all candidates for the Bachelor's Degree in all colleges. Advanced sections 
are provided for students who make exceptionally high grades on the Fresh- 
man English placement test. Staff 

3. Survey: English Literature. I, II. 3 hr. English authors from Beowulf to Burns 
and readings from their works. Upperclassmen may substitute English 163 
for this course. Staff 

4. Survey: English Literature. I, II. 3 hr. English authors from Robert Burns to 
present and readings from their works. Upperclassmen may substitute English 
164 for this course. Staff 

5. American Literature. I, II. 3 hi American authors with readings from then 
works to 1870. Staff 

6. American Literature. 1, II. 3 hi. American poetry and prose from 1870 to the 
present. Continuation of English 5. Staff 

9. Composition and Reading (for pre-Law students) . I. 3 hr. Expository writ- 
ing and readings of literary types in an anthology of poetry and prose. 

Mrs. S. Holden 

10. Composition and Reading. (For pre-Law students) . II. 3 hr. Argumentation 

and the logical basis for argumentation, together with readings in an anthology. 

Mrs. S. Holden 

13. Expository Writing. I, II. 2 hr. PR: English 1 and 2. Extensive practice 
in the various types of expository writing, together with the study of techniques. 

Staff 

14. Argumentative Writing. I, II. 2 hr. PR: English 1 and 2. Logical briefing 
as applied to argumentative writing and thinking. Staff 






THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 151 






16. Creative Writing I. Description. I, II. 3 hr. Exercises in the descriptive process; 
the practical and aesthetic values of description. Mrs. Reed 

17. Creative Writinc I. Narration. I, II. 3 hr. The elements of narration; 
point of view, motivation, and the presentation of character in short narratives; 
individual assignments and conferences. Mrs. Reed 

18. Advanced English Composition (Written and Spoken) . I, II. 3 hr. Practice 
in the organization of thought and in the correct and effective use of the 
language in writing and speaking, with emphasis on the various types and 
techniques of exposition. Staff 

23. Business English. I, II. 3 hr. For majors in Economics and Business Administra- 
tion. The writing of reports; assembling and analysis of data; business cor- 
respondence. Staff 

Upper Division 

115. Creative Writing III: Narration (Short Story). I, II. 2 hr. Purpose and 
pattern of the modern short story; study of examples in current periodicals; 
special assignments and conferences with individual students on a minimum 
number of short stories. Mrs. Reed 

125. Advanced Composition. I. 2 hr. Factual writing of articles on subjects of 
current interest. Mr. Gainer 

126. Advanced Composition. I, II. z hr. Technical forms of writing; designed par- 
ticularly for students in science, engineering, and agriculture. 

Mrs. Buswell 

127. The American Language. II. 2 hr. Words and their ways in American 
speech. Mr. Mockler 

129. Words. I, II. 2 hr. A practical course in vocabulary building with attention 
to derivation, history, and meanings of words. Miss Sayre 

138. English Literature, 1660-1774. I. 3 hr. A study of the literature from the 
Restoration to the death oi Pope, exclusive of the drama. Mr. Crocker 

139. English Literature, 1744-1798. II. 3 hr. A study of the literature from the death 
of Pope to the publication of Wordworth's Lyrical Ballads, exclusive of the 
drama. Mr. Crocker 

140. Elizabethan Poetry and Prose. L 3 hr. A study of the Renaissance in England 
as manifested in the great variety of nondramatic literary works of the six- 
teenth century, with emphasis on the major writers of the reign of Elizabeth. 

Mr. Brawner, Mr. Draper, and Mr. Foster 

141. Literature of 17th Century. II. 3 hr. A consideration of the major poets and 
prose writers of the 17th century, with the exception of dramatic writings. 

Mr. Brawner, Mr. Mockler, and Mr. Foster 

142. Shakespeare. I, II. 3 hr. A study of eleven or twelve of Shakespeare's most 
important plays. Mr. Brawner, Mr. Draper, and Mrs. Pettigrew 

160. Contemporary Literature, I. 2 hi. A study of modern British and American 
poets and prose writers— including novelists, short-story writers, dramatists, 
and essayists. Primary emphasis on the works. Includes Frost, Yeats, Gals- 
worthy, Eliot, Pound, Jeffers. Gather, Anderson, Fitzgerald, O'Neill, D. H. 
Lawrence, Huxley, Joyce, and Forster. Chronology is roughly from 1900 to 
1925. Mr. Bishop and Mr. Foster 

161. Contemporary Literature. II. 2 hr. A continuation of the preceding course 
from approximately 1925 to the present time. Includes Sandburg, Lindsay, 
Hart Crane, Wolfe, Faulkner, Evelyn Waugh, Farrell, Steinbeck, Auden, 
Graham Greene, Burke, Dylan Thomas, Spender, Robert Lowell, and Koestler. 

Mr. Bishop and Mr. Foster 



152 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



i 



163. English Litkrature. I, II. 3 hr. Survey: English Literature with special reference 
to the life, personality, ideas and influence of great English authors. May be 
substituted for English 3 but may not be elected by students who already have 
credit for English 3. Staff 

164. English Litkrature. I, II. 3 hr. Continuation of English 163. May be sub- 
stituted for English 4 but may not be elected by students who already have 
credit for English 4. Staff 

166. American Fiction. I. 3 hr. The reading of ten or more of the most im- 
portant American novels from Hawthorne to the present day, each considered 
as a work of art reflecting a significant view of life. Lectures on the works of 
principal authors, with class discussion of particular books. Mr. Brawner 

173. .Poetry. I, II. 2 hr. The appreciation and enjoyment of poems through critical 
'and analytical reading. Studies in the various types of poetry, and of the 
language, imagery, and techniques of poetic expression. Mr. Brawner 

175. The Short Story. I. 2 hr. A study of the historical development of the 
short story and the schools into which the work of short story writers is 
divided. Mr. Bishop 

180. Bible Literature: Old Testament and Apocrypha. I. 3 hr. The contents 
of the Old Testament, its literary structure, and its effect upon our liter- 
ature and thought. Mr. Marks 

181. Bible Literature: New Testament. II. 3 hr. The contents of the New Testa- 
ment, its literary structure, and its effect upon our literature and thought. 

Mr. Marks 

182. Masterpieces of English Literature. II. 3 hi. Intensive study of significant 
literary works. Mr. Crocker 

Upper- Division and Graduate Courses 

t22L— Advanced Rhetoric. II. 2 hr. A study of rhetorical techniques in great 
masterpieces of rhetoric. Mr. Gainer 

222. Modern American Biography. I. 3 hr. The best biographies about America's 
greatest. Miss Page 

223. Masterpieces of Biography. II. 3 hr. Several famous biographies of the 
Western world. Miss Page 

224. Literary Criticism. II. -4? hr. Deals with history of literary criticism from 
Aristotle to modern times. Mr. Crocker 

225. Recent Literary Criticism. I, II 3 hr. A brief survey of the theories and 
essays of the four major schools of modern criticism and an application of 
these theories to a novel, a play, and to selected poems and short stories. 

Mr. Foster 

226. Early Hebrew Culture and Literature. I. 2 hr. PR: Twelve hours 
of college English. A study of the Old Testament, Apocryphal writings, and 
related literary traditions. For teachers and other mature students. Not for 
graduate majors in English. Mr. Marks 

227. Early Christian Culture and Literature. II. 2 hr. PR: Twelve hours 
of college English. The New Testament, Christian apocryphal writings, and 
related bodies of literature and thought. For teachers and other mature 
students. Not for graduate majors in English. Mr. Marks 

228. Advanced Grammar. I, II. 3 hr. A course in descriptive grammar, the parts 
of speech, constructions, and methods of diagramming. Mr. Bishop 

230. History of the English Language. I. 3 hr. A study of the nature of 
the language; questions of origins, language families, development relation- 
ships of English as one of the Indo-European languages. Mr. Mockler 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 153 

231. Old English. I. 3 hr. A study of Anglo-Saxon grammar, with selected 
readings from the literature of the period. Mr. Mockler 

232. Beowulf. II. 3 hr. PR: English 231. Continuation of the study of Old English; 
critical reading of the poem Beoiculf. Mr. Mockler 

234. Chaucer. II. 3 hr. A study of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Troilus and 
Criseyde. In addition to an understanding and appreciation of Chaucer's 
literary work, the student is expected to acquire some knowledge of Chaucer's 
language. Mr. Mockler 

235. Shakespeare. I. 3 hr. A course for undergraduates and graduates in the 
detailed study of three of Shakespeare's major plays. Mr. Draper 

7237-. Metrical Romances. II. 2 hr. A study of medieval romance, Arthur and 
Charlemagne chronicles and romances, Malory and English romances, religious 
influences and love and chivalry in the romances. Staff 

239. Southern Writers. II. 3 hr. Examination of twentieth-century southern essayists, 
poets, short story writers, and novelists in relation to the ideological hack- 
ground. Mr. Foster 

t24& — Special Topics in American Literature. I, II. 2 hr. Reading in American 
literature illustrative of American ideals and movements. Miss Sayre 

f241. American Political Writings. II. 2 hr. A study of writings of American 
statesmen since 1865. Miss Sayre 

242. Literature for Teachers. S. 3 hr. Study and appreciation of selected works of 
American authors, with special reference to the high-school curriculum. Given 
usually in the Summer Session. Staff 

243. Literature for Teachers. S. 3 hr. Study and appreciation of selected works of 
English authors. Recommended for teachers of high-school English. Given 
usually in the Summer Session. Staff 

*244. Literature of the Sixteenth Century. I. 3 hr. Renaissance in England as 
reflected in literature with some consideration of the fine arts and other 
aspects of culture. Mr. Draper 

*245. Literature of the Seventeenth Century. II. 3 hr. The struggle between 
Cavalier and Puritan as reflected in the literature of the age. Mr. Draper 

*247. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. I. 3 hr. The culture-history of 
England 1700-1750, as expressed in social, economic, political, and religious 
movements, and as reflected in literature. Mr. Draper 

*248. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. II. 3 hr. A continuation of English 
247, covering the period from 1750-1800. Mr. Draper 

249. The Romantic Movement. I. 3 hr. The works of Wordsworth, Coleridge, 
and Keats, together with an introduction to works of scholarship in the field 
of English Romanticism. Mr. Brawner 

250. American Romanticism. II. 3 hr. The writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, 
Henry David Thoreau, and Nathaniel Hawthorne. A study of the relations 
of these men to the history of their own time, and of their contributions to 
American thought and art. Mr. Brawner 

t252. Modern English Literature, 1881-1918. I. 3 hr. A consideration of the 
revolt against mechanism, the new romanticism, doctrines of action, and 
contemporary tendencies. Mr. Crocker 

*253. Pre-Shakespearian Drama. I. 3 hr. A study of the medieval drama from its 
beginnings to the middle of the sixteenth century. Mr. Crocker 



154 (TRRICt I A AND COURSES 



*254. Elizabethian Drama. II. 3 hr. A study of the great dramatists of the 
Elizabethan period, exclusive of Shakespeare. Mr. Crocker 

t255. Restoration and Eighteenth Century Drama. I. 3 hr. A study of persistent 
forms and new developments in the drama of the period. Mr. Crocker 

256. Modern Drama. II. 3 hr. A study of world drama from Ibsen to the present 
day, with particular reference to -isms and ideas. Mr. Crocker 

257. Victorian Poetry. I. 3 hr. A study of the major Victorian poets— Tennyson, 
Browning, Arnold, Rossetti, Morris, Swinburne, Fitzgerald, and a few of the 
later Victorian poets. Mr. Gainer 

258. Victorian Prose. II. 3 hr. A study of the non-fictional writings of the great 
Victorian prose critics: Carlyle, Ruskin, Arnold, Newman, Macaulay, Huxley, 
Morris. Mr. Gainer 

259. Dramatic Art of Shakespeare. II. 3 hr. A study of several of Shakespeare's 
histories, comedies, and tragedies, showing the chronological development 
of his art and matters of stage presentation in Shakespeare's age. Mr. Bishop 

*260. Studies in Shakespearean Comedy. I, II. 3 hr. PR: English 142, or consent of 
instructor. Textual and dramatic study of representative comedies. 

Mrs. Pettigrew 

261. Technique of the Drama. I. 2 hr. A study of dramatic structure, with 

emphasis upon appreciation. Mr. Crocker 

263. Study of Selected Authors. I, II. 3 hr. A study of the principal works of 
English or American authors. Staff 

f264. Spenser. I. 3 hr. A study of Spenser's poetry, minor poems and The Faerie 
Queen, forms and sources, purpose of the great epic, social, political, and 
religious allegory. Staff 

*265. Pope. II. 3 hr. The study of Pope's satirical writings, showing his development 
as a satirist and the lives of those whom he satirized. Mr. Bishop 

|266. Browning. I, II. "2 hr. A study of Robert Browning's most important shorter 
poems and The Ring and the Book. Some attention will be given to the 
life and poems of Mrs. Browning. Staff 

267. Milton. II. 3 hr. A study of all of Milton's poems and of a few selected prose 
works. Mr. Gainer 

270. American Poetry. I. 3 hr. A study of the major American poets of the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries— Bryant, Poe, Emerson, Longfellow, Whit- 
man, Dickinson, Frost, Eliot. Primary emphasis on their poetry as poetry; 
background materials minimized. Mr. Foster 

272. Folk Literature. II. 3 hr. A study of the folk ballad, its origin, history, and 
literary significance, based on Child's collection and on American ballad 
collections. Mr. Gainer 

f273. The Folktale and Allied Forms. II. 3 hr. The fairy tale and other folk- 
tale types, their currency in oral tradition, great collections of folktales, 
theories of the folktale, and methods of study. Mr. Gainer 

*274. The Lyric. I, II. 2 hr. A history of lyric poetry with especial attention to 
the evolution of lyric styles. Mr. Draper 

*275. The English Novel to the Time of Scott. I. 3 hr. A study of the English 
novel from the Ifith century to the time of Scott, showing the development 
of the novelistic art from early narrative beginnings. 

*276. The English Novel. 1832-1900. II. 3 hr. A continuation of English 275. 
The development of the English novel from the early 19th century to 
the beginning of the 20th century. Mr. Bishop 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



L55 



f277. Master Writers of the Essay. II. 3 hr. Reading and discussion of the works 
of major essayists from Montaigne and Bacon to the present day, together 
with a study of the historical development of the essay as a literary form. 

Air. Brawner 

*278. Tragedy. II. 3 hr. Masterpieces of tragedy in drama, poetry, and fiction 
from Greek times to modern, with consideration of the changing concepts of 
tragedy and of the ethical and ideological values reflected in the works of major 
tragic authors. Mr. Brawner 

280. The Modern Novel. I, II. 3 hr. A study of technical methods employed by 
the twentieth century novelists. Thorough consideration of Henry James, 
Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, and others. Mr. Bishop 

*291. Introduction to Literary Research. I, II. 2 or 3 hr. Lectures and exercises 
in research problems to prepare the student for such work in graduate and 
professional schools. Mr. Draper 

Graduate Division 

392. Seminar. I. II. 2 or 3 hr. PR: Specific courses to be approved by the instructor. 
A graduate study of particular periods or authors. Staff 

GEOLOGY, MINERALOGY, AND GEOGRAPHY 

Professors Fridley and Wells; Associate Professors Cross and Ludlum; Assistant 
Professors Heald and Myers; Instructor Dally. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY 

Each candidate for the Bachelor of Science Degree is required to present credit 
for Geology 266 or its equivalent and must minor in an allied science. A total of 
132 hours is required. The following schedule is recommended; 



Freshman Hr. 


Sophomore 


Hr. 


Junior 


Hr. 


Senior Hr. 


Foreign lang. 


6 


Foreign lang. 


6 


Geol. 127 


2 


Geol. 221 


English 1 and 2 


6 


Geol. 1 and 2 


4 


Geol. 151 


4 


and 222 6 


Math. 3 


3 


Geol. 3 and 4 


4 


Geol. 161 


3 


Geol. 240 4 


Math. 4 


3 


Chem. 1 and 2 


8 


Geol. 172 


3 


Geol. 246 4 


Phvs. 1 and 3 


4 


C. E. 1 


2 


Geol. 184 


4 


Geol. 271 3 


Phys. 2 and 4 


4 


Mil. or Air 




Geol. 185 


4 


Geol. 272 4 


Mil. or Air 




3 and 4 


4 


Geol. 231 


4 


Electives from 


1 and 2 


4 


Electives (to com- 


Chem. 115 


3 


the following: 


Phys. Educ. 




plete general 




Chem. 163 


4 


E.M. 201 2 


1 and 2 


2 


\rts and Sci- 




Electives 


3 or 4 


Chem. E. 260 3 






ences require- 






Geol. 285, 286 8 






ments) 


6 






Other 

electives 5 to 7 



32 



84 



34-35 



32-34 



Geology 266 (6 hours) will normally be taken in the summer following the junior 
vear. Math. 5, Analytic Geometry, is required in either the sophomore or junior 
year. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOLOGY 

Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Geology are essentially 
the same as for the Bachelor of Science Degree except that the minor subject 
need not be a science, and that Math. 5 and some of the course material in Engineering 
are not required. Only 128 hours are required for this degree. 

*Given only in alternate years. 
tNot given in 1953-54. 



156 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Courses of Instruction 
geology and mineralogy 

Lower Division 

1. Physical Geology. I, II. 3 hr. Scientific description of composition and 
structure of earth; physical processes which change earth surface. (Geology 
1 must be accompanied by Geology 2 in order to meet the requirements for 
4 hours of a laboratory science in physical geology.) Staff 

2. Physical Geology Laboratory. I, II. 1 hr. Accompanies Geol. 1. Staff 

3. Historical Geology. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 1. Evolution of earth and its 
inhabitants. (Geology 3 must be accompanied by Geol. 4 in order to meet 
requirements for 4 hours of a laboratory science in historical geology.) 

Mr. Wells 

4. Historical Geology Laboratory. I, II. 1 hr. Accompanies Geol. 3. Mr. Wells 

Upper Division 
125. Geolocic Drafting. I, II. 1 hr. PR: Geol. 2 and 4. Staff 

127. Map Interpretation. I. 2 hr. PR: Geol. 2 and 4. Relation of earth structure 
and history to land forms as shown on topographic maps. Mr. Fridle\ 

128. Map Interpretation. II. 2 hr. Continuation of Geol. 127. Mr. Fridle) 

129. Cartography. I, II. 2 hr. Techniques, principles, and practices in art of map 
and graph construction. Letter and drawing instruments used in cop) 
and field lay-out work designed for reproduction. Mr. Myers 

151. Structural Geology. I. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 3. Shape and position of rock 
masses in earth's crust; mechanical principles underlying various types of rock 
deformation; indication of economic importance of deformed rock structures 
with respect to recovery of mineral products. Mr. Ludlum 

152. Structural Geology Laboratory. I or II. 1 hr. PR: Geology 3. A laboratory 
course to accompany or follow the lecture course, Geology 151, Structural 
Geology. Mr. Ludlum 

161. Field Geology. II. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 151. An introduction to actual field 
techniques utilized by geologist in mapping and reporting on geology of 
unknown regions. Local areas studied in detail. Mr. Dally 

170. Natural Resources and Geology of West Virginia. II. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 1 or 
107. A summary of geology of the State from a historical and economic stand- 
point. Staff 

172. Economic Geology: Nonmetallics. II. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 184. Occurrence, 
formation, and use of nonmetallic mineral substances, including ground water, 
building materials, and chemicals. Mr. Ludlum 

184. Mineralogy. I. 4 hr. PR: One year each of geology and chemistry. Elements 
of crystallography and systematic study of minerals except silicates. Identifi- 
cation of minerals by their physical properties supplemented by blowpipe 
analysis. Mr. Heald 

185. Mineralogy and Petrography. II. 4 hr. PR: Geol. 184. Description, mode of 
occurrence, and classification of silicate minerals and rocks. Mr. Heald 

221. Geomorphology. I. 3 /hr. PR: Geol. 151. Study of surface features of eastern 
United States. Mr. Fridley 

222. Geomorphology. II. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 151. Continuation of Geol 221. Surface 
features of western United States. Mr. Fridley 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 157 

231. Invertebrate Paleontology. I. 4 hr. PR: Geol. 3 and 4. Invertebrate fossils; 
their biologic classification, evolutionary development, and use in correlation 
of strata. Mr. Wells 

235. Introductory Paleobotany. I, 4 hr. PR: Geol. 3 and/or Bot. 2. A resume of 
the development of principal plant groups through the ages, present distribu- 
tion, mode of occurrence and index species, methods of collection. Mr. Cross 

236. Advanced Paleobotany. II. 4 hr. Continuation of Geol. 235. Mr. Cross 

239. Seminar in Paleobotany. I, II. 1-2 hr. per semester. PR: Geol 235. Mr. Cross 

240. Principles of Stratigraphy. II. 4 hr. PR: Geol. 231. Study of the principles 
of rock and time correlation, with emphasis on their application to the 
stratigraphy of West Virginia. Mr. Dally 

246. Sedimentation. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 184. Origin of sedimentary rocks; 
principles involved in interpretation of ancient geography, climates, animals, 
and plants; i.e., basic foundations for stratigraphy. Mr. Dally 

247. Sedimentation Laboratory. I or II. 1 hr. PR: Geology 185. A laboratory course 
to accompany or follow the lecture course, Geology 246, Sedimentation. 

Mr. Dally 

266. Field Geology. SI. 6 hr. PR: Geol. 161. Practical experience in detailed 

geological field procedures and mapping. Living expenses are in addition 

to tuition and must be paid on or before registering. Staff 

269. X-Ray Diffraction. I or II. 2 hr. The theory of X-Ray diffraction and 
application to the identification of crystalline materials, emphasis on powder 
technic. Open to advanced students in geology, chemistry, chemical engineering, 
and mining engineering with permission of the instructor. Mr. Heald 

271. Economic Geology: Ore Deposits. I. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 172 and 185. Mineral 
composition, geologic features, and distribution of deposits of principal useful 
metallic minerals. Mr. Ludlum 

272. Petroleum Geology. II. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 151. Origin, geologic distribu- 
tion, methods of exploration and exploitation, uses and future reserves of 
petroleum and natural gas in world, with special attention to U.S. Mr. Ludlum 

273. Petroleum Geology Laboratory. II. 1 hr. PR: Geology 151. A laboratory 
course to accompany or follow the lecture course, Geology 272, Petroleum 
Geology. Mr. Ludlum 

274. Seminar in Economic Geology. I, II. 1-2 hr. per semester. PR: Geol. 172 

Mr. Ludlum 

275. Coal Geology. I. 4 hr. PR: Geol. 4. Study of origin, nature, and distribution 
of coal deposits. Includes an intioduction to microscopic study of coal 
specimens. Mr. Cross 

276. Advanced Coal Geology. II. 4 hr. Continuation of Geol. 275. Mr. Cross 

285. Optical Mineralogy. I. 4 hr. PR: Geol. 185 and one year of physics. Principles 
and practice in use of petrographic microscope in identification of minerals. 
Emphasis on determinations by immersion method. Mr. Heald 

286. Petrology. II. 4 hr. PR: Geol. 285. Composition, texture, occurrence, and 
origin of rocks. Study of hand specimens and thin sections. Mr. Heald 

290. Geologic Problems. I or II. 2-4 hr. Specialized work for seniors and graduates. 
Consult departmental adviser before registering. Staff 

291, 292. Seminar. I, II. 1 hr. Mr. Wells 



158 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Graduate Division 
329. Problems in Geomorphology. 1, II. 1-4 hi. PR: Gcol. 222. Mr. Fridley 

332. Micropaleontology. II. 4 hr. PR: Geol. 231. Identification of Foraminifera, 
Bryozoa, and Ostracoda with aid of microscope. Emphasis upon classification, 
nomenclature, and use of paleontological literature. Mr. Wells 

334. Problems in Paleontology. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Geol. 231. Mr. Wells 

339. Problems in Paleobotany. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Geol. 235. Mr. Cross 

348. Problems in Sedimentation. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Geol. 246. Mr. Dally 

349. Problems in Stratigraphy. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Geol. 240. Mr. Dally 

359. Problems in Structural Geology. I, II. 1-4. PR: Geol. 151. Mr. Ludlum 

366. Problems in Field Geology. I, II. 1-6 hr. PR: Geol. 161. Mr. Dally 

374. Problems in Advanced Economic Geology. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Geol. 271. 

Mr. Ludlum 
376. Problems in Coal Geology. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Geol. 276. Mr. Cross 

379. Seminar in Coal Research. I, II. 1-2 hr. PR: Consent. Credit 1 hour per 
semester, maximum credit 2 hours. (In cooperation with other departments 
and the U.S. Bureau of Mines.) Staff 

387. Advanced Petrology. I. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 286. A study of the composition, 
classification, and origin of the igneous and metamorphic rocks. Laboratory 
work consists of a study of crystalline rocks mainly by microscopical methods. 

Mr. Heald 

388. Problems in Mineralogy and Pftroi.ogy. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Geol. 286. 

Mr. Heald 

397, 398. Research. I, II. 1-5 hr. Specialized work for advanced students based 

upon field or laboratory evidence and reported upon in candidacy for 

advanced degrees. Staff 

GEOGRAPHY 

Upper Division 

107. Introductory Geography. I. 3 hr. Relationship between environment and 
forms of life; emphasis on physiography and climatology. Mr. Myers 

109. Economic Geography. II. 3 hr. Regional method of treating agricultural, 
industrial, and commercial development of each of various countries of the 
world. Mr. Myers 

116. Geography of North America. II. 3 hr. A regional study of the area north 
of Rio Grande with interpretation of geographic factors influencing growth, 
and problems connected with future development. Mr. Myers 

118. Geography or Europe. I. 3 hr. Geographic description of continent as a 
whole, its political divisions, followed by study of individual regions. Mr. Myers 

215. Industrial Geography. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of economics, history, geology. 
Factors which contribute to development of major industrial regions; detailed 
analysis of selected industries. Mr. Myers 

219. Seminar in Geography. I, II. 1-3 hr. per semester. PR: 12 hr. of economics, 
history, geology. Mr. Myers 

Graduate Division 
319. Problems in Geography. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: 12 hr. of social studies and 
geology. Mr. Myers 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 159 

GERMAN 

Associate Professor Lemke; Assistant Professor Stillwell; Instructors Cameron, Taylor, 
and Thurber. 

The chief objective of the Department is to enable the student to read thoughtful 
German without the aid of a dictionary. Of German 1, 2, 3 and 4, each is prerequisite 
to the next following, and the four combined are prerequisite to all other courses 
except German 111, 112, 121, and 122. 

Students majoring in German are advised to base their schedule on upper- 
division courses from the following subjects, which are listed here in the order of 
their importance: German, education, English, European history, Romance languages, 
and modern philosophy. Those who are not planning to teach German may omit 
the courses in education, but the sequence of subjects, from the angle of their 
desirability for a major in German remains the same. 

Courses of Instruction 32 

Lower Division 

1. Elementary German. I, II. 3 hr. Pronunciation, syntax, reading, com- 
position. Staff 

2. Elementary German. I, II. 3 hr. Extensive reading. Staff 

3. Intermediate German. I. 3 hr. Rapid reading of prose by modern authors. 

Staff 

4. Intermediate German. II. 3 hr. Continuation of German 3. Staff 

Upper Division 

105. The German Novelle. I. 3 hr. Representative stories of Keller, Meyer, 
Storm, and Stifter. Mr. Lemke 

106. The German Novelle. II. 3 hr. From naturalism to present dav. Con- 
tinuation of German 105. Mr. Lemke 

107. Nineteenth Century Drama. I. 3 hr. Critical study of selected dramas by 
Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Ludwig. Mr. Lemke 

108. Nineteenth Century Drama. II. 3 hr. Continuation of German 107. Mr. Lemke 

111. Spoken German. I. 3 hr. Practice in speaking and writing. Mr. Stillwell 

112. Spoken German. II. 3 hr. Continuation of German 111. Mr. Stilwell 

121. Scientific German. I. 3 hr. Primarily for students in science courses. Staff 

122. Scientific German. II. 3 hr. Continuation of German 121. Staff 
136. Introduction to Goethe. II. 3 hr. Mr. Lemke 
161. Lyric Poetry. I. 3 hr. Mr. Lemke 

201. Independent Reading. I. 3 hr. Supervised reading for students who wish 
to do intensive work in any field of interest. Mr. Lemke 

202. Independent Reading. II. 3 hr. Continuation of German 201. Mr. Lemke 

211. Middle High German. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hours of German from upper division. 

Mr. Stilwell 

212. Middle High German. II. 3 hr. Continuation of German 211. Mr. Stilwell 

32German 1, 2, 3, and 4 each is prerequisite to the next following', and the four 
combined are prerequisite to all other courses with the exception of German 111, 
112, 121, and 122, for which German 1 and 2 are prerequisite. 



160 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



231. Advanced Spoken German. I. 3 hr. PR: German 111 and 112. Additional 
practice in speaking and writing German. Mr. Stilwell 

232. Advanced Spoken German. II. 3 hr. Continuation of German 231. Mr. Stilwell 
fill. Fjiuot, Pjw t I. I. 3 In. C ritical study of Goethe's Faust. Mr. Lemke 
242. Faust, Part II. II. 3 hr. Continuation of German 241. Mr. Lemke 

244. German Literature Before Goethe. II. 3 hr. A survey of German literature 
from its beginnings to the middle of the 18th century. Mr. Stilwell 

245. Survey of German Literature, 1766-1870. I. 3 hr. Mr. Lemke 

246. Survey of German Literature, 1870-1940. II. 3 hr. Mr. Lemke 

251. History of the German Language. I. 3 hr. P <.: 18 hr. of German or consent. 
Development since ancient times. Mr. Stilwell 

252. German Philology. II. 3 hr. PR: German 251 or consent. Comparison of old 
Germanic dialects and literatures. Mr. Stilwell 

272. The Romantic Movement. II. 3 hr. Mr. Lemke 

275. The Modern Novel. I. 3 hr. PR: 18 hr of German. Supervised reading of 
nineteenth century. Mr. Lemke 

276. The Modern Novel. II. 3 hr. Continuation of German 275, with emphasis 
on recent fiction. Mr. Lemke 

281. Old Norse. I. 3 hr. PR: consent. Elementary study of Old West Norse 
prose. Mr. Stilwell 

282. Old Norse. II. 3 hr. Readings in various Old Icelandic sagas; introduction 
to Old Norse poetry. Continuation of German 281. Mr. Stilwell 

HISTORY 

Professors Summers, Easton, and Ennis; Associate Professors Keen and Smith; 

Assistant Professors Barns and Cross; Lecturer Lambert 

Before graduation history majors are required to complete 18 hours in up- 
per-division courses, including History 276, introduction to historical research 
and bibliography. Six hours in political science and 6 hours in economics are also 
required in addition to the special requirements for the A.B. Degree. Students 
who expect to major in history should complete the following subjects, or their 
equivalents, in their first and second years; English, 6 hours; French or Ger- 
man, 12 hours; history, 12 hours, which should include History 52 and 53 and may 
include one year's work in either Humanities or Social Sciences general courses; 
laboratory science, 8 hours; political science, 6 hours; and economics, 6 hours. 
In planning work in history, students should consult the department in order 
that advanced courses may be properly correlated as well as suited to individual 
needs and tastes. One lower-division "year course" or equivalent in history is 
prerequisite for a major, but prospective majors are advised to take two such 
courses or History 52 and History 53 and one year of Humanities or Social Sci- 
ences general courses. 

Courses of Instruction 

Lower Division'-* 3 

1. World Civilization from the Earliest Times to the Reformation. I, II. 
3 hr. For freshmen. The development of social, economic, and political 
institutions. Mr. Easton, Mr. Ennis, and Miss Smith 

33A11 first and second-year courses are offered as lower-division "year courses." 
These courses run through the year, but in no case is the first half-year a prere- 
quisite for the second half. For example, History 1 is not a prerequisite for His- 
tory 2. History 1 and History 2 make up the introductory first year in history. 
History 52 and 53 are primarily for sophomores. A freshman should not take 
more than one "year course" at a time. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



161 



2. World Civilization from the Reformation to the Present. I, II. 3 hr. 
For freshmen. Continuation of History 1. 

Mr. Easton, Mr. Ennis, and Miss Smith 

52. Growth of American Nation ro 1865. I, II. 3 hr. Primarily for sophomores. 

Mr. Barns, Mr. Cross, Mr. Keen, and Mr. Summers 

53. Making of Modern America, 1865 to Present. I, II. 3 hr. Primarily for 
sophomores. Mr. Barns, Mr. Cross, Mr. Keen, and Mr. Summers 



Upper Division 

101. History of Ancient Times: Stone Age to Fall of Rome.* 

102. Medieval Europe: Fall of Rome to Renaissance.* I. 3 hr 

103. Modern Europe. 1500-1815. I. 3 hr. 

104. Modern Europe, 1815 to the Present. II. 3 hr. 

107. French Revolution.* I. 3 hr. 

108. Napoleonic Era.* II. 3 hr. 

133. British Civilization to 1689. I. 3 hr. 

134. British Civilization since 1689. II. 3 hr. 
145. Current American Problems. I or II. 3 hr. 



3 hr. 



148. Living Issues in American History. I or II. 3 hr. 
150. West Virginia. I, II. 3 hr. /V 









Mr. Easton 

Mr. Easton. 

Staff 

Staff 

Mr. Easton 

Mr. Easton 

Miss Smith 

Miss Smith 

Mr. Cross 

Mr. Barns 

Mr. Lambert 

Mr. Cross 

Mr. Cross 

Mr. Ennis 

Mr. Barns 

Mr. Barns 

Mr. Barns 






151. American Colonial History. I or II. 3 hr. 

152. The Growth of American Nationalism, 1763-1850. 1 or II. 3 hr. 
164. History of Asia. I. 3 hr. 

179. American Economic History to 1865. I. 3 hr. 

180. American Economic History since 1865. II. 3 hr. 

181. The American Labor Movement. II. 3 hr. 

/ nib* ^ / /, 

206. The Renaissance and the Reformation. II. 3 hr. PR: For seniors and graduate 
students with one year of history, or with consent. Mr. Easton 

207. Cultural Europe, 1600-1800. I or II. 3 hr. PR: For seniors and graduate 
students with one year of European history, or with consent. Mr. Easton 

208. Cultural Europe, 19th Century. I or II. 3 hr. Continuation of Hist. 207. 

Mr. Easton 

213. Social and Economic Development of Modern Europe, 1750-1870. I. 3 hr. PR: 
History 1 and 2, or consent. Miss Smith 

214. Social and Economic Development of Modern Europe Since 1870. II. 3 hr. 
Continuation of Historv 213. . Miss Smith 



217. "History of~Fra 

PR: Same as for History 206. 



js to the Fourth Republic. I or II. 3 hr 



o 

Mr. Easton 



/ 218. History of German y/ Jprom . -t« . b H qhenstauffln to the Second World War. 

I or II. 3 hr. PR: Same as for History 206. Mr. Easton 



219. Histor\ of Russia from Varangians to Bolsheviks. 
for Hist. 207. 



3 hr. PR: Same as 
Mr. Easton 



PR: One college course in European history, or consent of instructor. 



V 



'9/, 



162 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



220. Latin American History: Colonial Period and Wars of Independence. I. 3 
hr. PR: Foi seniors and graduate students with one year of history, or 
consent. Mr. Keen 

221. Latin America Since 1824. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Hist. 220. Mr. Keen 

222. The Hispanic Background of American History. I, II. 3 hr. For seniors 
and graduate students, or with consent. Mr. Keen 

231. The British Empire. I. 3 hr. PR: Hist. 134 or consent. Miss Smith 

234. Social and Economic History of Modern England. I and II. 3 hr. PR: 
Hist. 134. Miss Smith 

236. English Constitutional Growth. 1 or II. 3 hr. Hist. 133. Miss Smith 

241. Europe from Sedan to Versailles. I. 3 hr. PR: Hist. 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

Mr. Ennis 

242. Europe from Versailles to Nuremberg II. 3 hr. Continuation of Hist. 241. 

Mr. Ennis 

249. The Wesiward Movement to 1820. I. 3 hr. PR: Hist. 52 and 53 or equivalent. 

/ Mr. Cross 

250. Economic and Social Development of West Virginia. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Con- 
sent. Primarily for teachers. Staff 

254. Trans-Mississippi West. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Hist. 249. Mr. Cross 

255. The Jacksonian Era. II. 3 hi. PR: Hist. 52. Mr. Cross 

256. The Old South. I, II. 3 hr. For seniors and graduate students, or with 
consent. Mr. Summers 

257. The American Civil War. I, II. 3 hr. For seniors and graduate students, 
or with consent. Mr. Summers 

258. Reconstruction and National Development, 1865-1898. II. 3 hr. For 
seniors and graduate students, oi wit ii consent. Mr. Summers 

259. The United States from McKinley to the New Deal, 1898-1933. I. 3 hr. PR: 
Seniors and graduate students, or consent. Mr. Barns 

260. American Diplomacy to 1898. 1. 3 hr. Hist. 52 and 53 or equivalent. 

Mr. Keen 

261. American Foreign Policy and Diplomacy, 1898-1947. II. 3 hr. Continuation 
of Hist. 260. Mr. Keen 

262. Problems of the Pacific. II. 3 hr. PR: Hist. 164. Mr. Ennis 

263. Anglo-American Diplomatic Relations. I. 3 hr. PR: For seniors and 
graduate students, or with consent. Mr. Keen 

264. The United States and Latin America, 1783-1947. II. 3 hr. PR: For 
seniors and graduate students, or consent. Mr. Keen 

265. American Constitutional Development to 1860. I. 3 hr. PR: History 52 
and 53 or equivalent. Mr. Lambert 

266. American Constitutional Development since 1860. II. 3 hr. Continuation 
of History 265. Mr. Lambert 

269. Recent American History. I or II. 3 hr. For senior and graduate students, 
or with consent. Mr. Barns 

270. Partition of Asia. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Hist. 164. Mr. Ennis 

271. Problems in Contemporary Europe. I or II. 3 hr. Continuation of History 
242. Mr. Ennis 












J— 



3 --' 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



163 



276. Introduction to Historical Research and Bibliography. I, II. 3 hr. This 
course prescribed in fourth year for all history majors. Mr. Summers 

277. The Literature of American History. I or II. 3 hr. Open to graduate 
students in history and to seniors majoring in history Staff 

282. History of American Agriculture. I or II. 3 hr. PR: History 52 and 53, or 
consent. Mr. Barns 

290. Growth of American Thought Before 1865. II. 3 hr. For seniors and 
graduate students, or with consent. Mr. Cross 

291. Growth of American Thought Since 1865. II. 3 hr. For seniors and grad- 
uate students, or with conseni. Mr. Cross 



Craduate Division 

301, 302. Thesis. I, II. 2 or 3 hr. each semester. 
303, 304. Research. I, II. 6 hr. each semester. 
310 Topics in American Intellectual History. 1. II. 3 hr. 



Staff 

Staff 

Mr. Cross 



349, 350. Problems in Local and Regional History. 1, II. 3 hr. each semester. 

,-Mr. Barns and Mr. Summers 
358. American Political Leaders, 1877-1921. I or II. 3 hr: - - / Mr. Summers 

360. Rise of Nationalism in Asia. I or II. 3 hr. Mr. Ennis 



361. Contributions of Asia to Western Civilization. I or II. 3 hr. 



Mr. Ennis 



384, 385. Problems in British Imperialism and World Politics. I, II. 3 hr. each 
semester. Miss Smith 

389. Problems in Revolutionary Europe, 1763-1815. I or II. 3 hr. Mr. Easton 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Professor Noer (Adviser) and Staff 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts with a major in Home Economics is offered by 
the College of Arts and Sciences Courses for this program of study are provided by 
the College of Arts and Sciences and by the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and 
Home Economics. In order to qualify for this degree, a student must meet the general 
requirements for the A.B. degree as outlined on page 122. The general courses 
listed below are taught by the Home Economics staff of the College of Agriculture, 
horestry, and Home Economics and are approved for fulfillment of the requirements 
of a major in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Careers in home economics are open to practically every type of girl: the artistic, 
the businesslike, the science minded, the teacher, and the homebody. Students who 
elect home economics as a major will find it possible to prepare at the same time for 
homemaking and a profession. The knowledge and experience gained in pursuing a 
course in home economics also will help the student to become an efficient, under- 
standing, and happy homemaker. 

A student desiring to obtain a high-school teaching certificate in the field of 
Home Economics should inform her adviser at the beginning of the first semester 
so that a proper program may be planned. For specific information in regard to 
certification for teaching, see the bulletin Requirements Applicable to Degrees and 
Certificates. 

A suggested curriculum: 



164 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



FIRST 


VEAR 




SECOND 


YEAR 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


English 1 3 
Phys. Science 

or Psychology 4 
History 1 or 3 


English 2 3 
Phys. Science 

or Psychology 4 
History 2 or 3 


English 3 
Foreign language 3 
Home Ec. 12 3 
Home Ec. 3 2 


Speech 3 
Foreign language 3 
Home Ec. 23 2 
Home Ec. 15 4 


Humanities 1 4 


Humanities 2 4 


*Electives 


5 


*Electives 4 


Home Ec. 1 


Home Ec. 3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 1 


or Home Ec. 2 2 


or Home Ec. 4 2 








Foreign language 3 
Phys. Ed. 1 


Foreign language 3 
Phys. Ed. 1 








15-16 


15-16 




17 


17 


THIRD 


YEAR 




FOURTH 


YEAR 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 



Home Ec. 114 2 Home Ec. 106 3 *Home Ec. Home Ec. 

*Home Ec. *Home Ec. electives 4-6 electives 4-6 

electives 4-7 electives 4-6 Minor sequence 2-4 Minor sequence 2-4 

Minor sequence 2-4 Minor sequence 2-4 *Gen. electives 4-8 *Gen. electives 4-8 

*Gen. electives 2-4 *Gen. electives 2-4 



16 



16 



16 



♦Electives selected with the help of the adviser to meet the personal and 
vocational needs and interests of the student and at the same time to fulfill the 
requirements for an A.B. degree. 



Courses of Instruction 
(Foods and Nutrition) 

1. Elementary Nutrition. I, II. 2 hr. Essentials of adequate diet; application with 



particular reference to needs of college students. 



Miss Roberts 



1A. Elementary Nutrition. I, II. 2 hr. Advanced section of H.E. 1 for those 
who qualify on basis of placement test. Miss Roberts 

11 or 111. Requirements for Normal Human Nutrition. I, II. 3 hr. Lecture and 
demonstration. Two 2-hr. and one 1-hr. classes per week Miss Roberts 

15. Food Selection and Preparation. I, II, 4 hr. PR: H. E. 1, or consent. Two 
lectures and two labs. Chemical and physical basis for food pre-rrvation with 
enough experimental work to give an understanding of reasons Tor recom 
mended procedures in preparation of food products of high quality. Miss Amick 

101. Nutrition. I. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 15 or consent. Food needs as affected by such 
factors as age, sex, and activity; nutritive value of common foods; planning of 
adequate diets at different cost levels. Miss Roberts 

115. Meal Planninc, Preparation, and Service. I. II. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 1 and H.E. 15 
or consent. One lecture and one 3-hr. lab. Problems in selection and purchase 
of foods; planning, preparing, and serving of meals, including wise use of 
time and energy. Miss Amick 

121. Nutrition Work with Children. TI. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 15, 115, 101 or consent. 
Problems involved in feeding children optimum diets. Opportunity for stu- 
dents to (1) prepare noon meals for University Nursery School Children; (2) 
observe a number of hot-lunch programs in and near Morgantown. 

Miss Roberts 

185. Problems in Food. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR. Consent. Primarily designed for students 
not majoring in home economics. Staff 

221. Community Nutrition Problems. I. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 101 or consent. Two hr. of 
staff lectures and field work. Includes consideration of organizations and 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 165 

agencies through which these problems may be solved. Primarily designed for 
students not majoring in home economics. 

(Textiles and Clothing) 

2. Elementary Clothing. I, II. 2 hr. Problems in selection and construction of 
clothing. For freshmen and others who do not pass placement test. 

Miss Stoflet 

12. Intermediate Clothing. I, II. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 2 or exemption of H.E. 2 by 

placement test. Particular emphasis on high standards of workmanship and 

evaluation of work and progress. As students develop skill they will be 

expected to work with increasing independence. Miss Stoflet 

17. Textiles. I, II. 3 hr. Lecture and lab combined. Textile fibers and fabrics 
studied with view to their use in dress and in the home. Characteristics of 
the major fibers and their suitability to various uses. Study of standard and 
novelty materials with emphasis on appropriate use and care. Miss Dietrich 

32 or 132. Clothing Techniques. II. 2 hr. Not open to home economics majors. 
Course designed primarily for students not majoring in home economics. 
Techniques for simple garment construction, remodeling, alteration and repair. 
Problems adapted to needs of individual students. Especially planned for 
Arts students and young homemakers. Miss Stoflet and Miss Dietrich 

102. Clothing Selection. I, II. 2 hr. PR: H. E. 3, H.E. 2 or consent. Two lectures. 
Selection of clothing for whole family from viewpoint of design, color, and 
economy. Clothing inventories and buying plans. Miss Stoflet 

117. Textile Buying. II. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 17. Lecture and laboratory combined. 
Buying of textiles for all types of clothing and for household. At least one 
field trip required. Miss Dietrich 

182. Problems in Clothing Construction. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. Staff 

(Applied Art) 

3. Art Applied to Personal Problems. I, II. 2 hr. Principles of design and color 
applied so as to help college students meet problems of daily living. Problems 
may include room arrangement, clothing, design, etc. Miss Palmer 

13 or 113. House Decoration. II. 3 hr. For nonmajors. Designed primarily for 
students who are not majoring in home economics. Two lectures and one 
lab. Materials and furnishings that go into decoration and furnishing a home, 
with emphasis on cost, buying, and reconditioning. Miss Palmer 

23. Present-Day Housing. I, II. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 3 or consent. Factors to be 
considered in providing housing for families at different income levels. Special 
attention to low-cost housing. Factors to be considered in selecting a home 
and furnishings for families of different income levels. Lab practice in im- 
proving rooms, apartments, and houses— using materials commonly found in 
rural communities and small towns. Miss Palmer 

123. Home Planning and Furnishing. I, II. 4 hr. PR: H.E. 23. Two lectures and 
two laboratories. Fundamentals of wise planning to meet family needs; under- 
standing of house structure and home needs. Discussions on home decorating 
based on various income levels and suited to various communities and needs. 

Miss Palmer 

133. Home Crafts. I, II. 2 hr. Two labs. Experience in simple crafts, using such 
materials as leather, plastic, metals, paper, thread, and fabric for creation of 
useful and beautiful objects. Equipment and materials used are those readily 
available in home, school, and camp situations. Miss Palmer 

233. Costume Design. I. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 3, 12, 117. Techniques of figure and 
fashion drawing. Problems in designing costumes and ensembles for indi- 
viduals of various types and ages. Miss Stoflet 



166 C IRRICt I. A AND COURSES 



(Health and Child Care) 

16 or 116. Home Nursing. II. 2 hi. 1 lecture, one 2-hr. lab. Practices to promote 
family health and caring for minor illnesses. Staff 

106. Child Development. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Psych. 1 or 3 or Ed. 105 or 106, H.E. 101. 
Two lectures. Child from prenatal period to pre-adolescence. University 
Nursery School used for observing pre-school children. Each girl spends 3 
hours a week observing and assisting. Stafl 

206. Observation and Participation in Nursery School. I, II. 1-2 hr. PR. H.E. 106. 
Directed experience in working with children in a nursery-school situation. 
Laboratory and conference. Staff 

(Home Management) 

14 or 114. Management of Family Living. II. 2 hr. PR: H.E. 4 or consent. Influence 
of home conditions on families and familv members. In considering wavs of 
meeting evervdav problems of families, an attempt will be made to apply 
findings of science and techniques of management in such a way as to help 
families achieve satisfaction in living. Mrs. Jones 

124. Demonstration Techniques. II. 2 hr. PR: Minimum of 4 hours in each of 4 
areas of home economics, and consent. Lecture demonstration as means of 
presenting home economics materials to groups. Development and presenta- 
tion of demonstrations suitable for secondarv schools and for use with adult 
groups. Miss Amick 

214. Economic Problems of the Home. I. II. 2 hr. PR: 30 hours of H.E., Econ. 1. 
Economic problems of familv. Standard of living, budgeting, and account 
keeping, buying problems. Value of household production. Providing for 
future. Miss Davis 

224. Principles of Home Management. I, II. 2 hr. Time and energy management, 
house care, pest control, buying and storing foods, use and care of home equip- 
ment, entertaining, money management, simple record keeping, and infant care. 
Junior standing preceding or parallel with H. E. 234. Miss Davis 

234. Home-Management Laboratory. I, II. 3 hr. PR: H.E. 1, 114, 115. Arranged. 
Emphasis on satisfying family life and social relationships. Approximately five 
weeks of home residence, and one hour of discussion each week throughout 
the semester. Staff 

254. Household Equipment. 2 hr. PR: Senior standing. Selection, arrangement, use, 
and care of equipment for various situations and for different income levels. 
Laboratorv and discussion. Miss Davis 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Assistant Professor Reese and Staff 

Courses in librarv science are designed to meet the needs of students 
preparing to qualifv for State certification as teacher-librarians in public schools. 
Certain courses, however, will be of particular value to all students in helping 
them to find library materials for their class work. The courses "Children's 
Literature and Story Telling" and "Reference and Bibliography" are of value 
to all prospective teachers. 

No student should select Library Science as a major or teaching field unless 
he or she has the abilitv to work well with children and young people and 
is easily and quickly adapted to new situations. Genuine enthusiasm for and 
broad knowledge of books are desirable. 






THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



167 



Courses of Instruction 

lower Division 

1. Using Books and Libraries. I, II. 2 hr. Planned to give a working know- 
ledge of library facilities, particularly of the University Library. Basic 
reference materials are considered together with simple bibliography making. 
A general course useful to any student in the University and required 
for majors in library science. Staff 



7, 



Upper Division 

101. Reference and Bibliography. I 3 hr. Basic reference books, dictionaries, en- 
cyclopedias, indexes, vear books, and other reference materials are studied 
and evaluated, with practice in detailed bibliography making. Staff 

102. Cataloguing and Classification. II. 3 hr. Fundamental principles of catalogu- 
ing and classification, with practical experience in handling all types of 
books. Problems of teacher-librarians receive special attention. Staff 

Children's Literature and Storytelling. I, IL 3 hr. Survey: books for 
children approached through subject units which include folklore, poetry, 
biography, social studies, science. Aids in book selection, illustration of 
hildren's books, nursery and picture books, problems and methods in read- 
ing guidance, storytelling technique with practical experience in telling 
stories. Staff 




t 



~ 



/ 



104. Book Selection. II. 2 hr. Reading and evaluation of representative books 
in broad subject fields; emphasis on contemporary books and adult reading 
interests. Practical work in use of selection aids and in oral and written 
book reviewing. Staff 

Book Selection for Adolescents. II. 2 hr. Types of literature read by 

young people of high-school age, methods of directing and stimulating read- 

intesrests, wide reading and discussion of books in various fields, 

evaluation of selection aids. For individuals working with teen-age groups. 

Staff 
106. History of Books and Libraries. II. 3 hr. Survey course, including the develop- 
ment of writing, the history of writing materials, the development of the 
book from early manuscript form, history of printing, printers, illustrators, 
bindings, and libraries. Staff 

Administration of School Libraries. I. 3 hr. Management of school libraries: 

organization of book collection, housing, equipment and maintenance, practice 

simple mending and binding processes, planning instruction in use of 

boblcs; qualifications and duties of librarian, her relation to school library \ - 

community and to public library. Staff 

. - • 

108. Library Practice. I, II. 3 hr. Field Work: embodies application of techniques 

in various types of libraries. Visits to libraries in surrounding area. Staff 

JToj- , 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors Davis, Stewart, and Vehse; Associate Professors Cole, Cunningham, and 
Vest; Assistant Professors Peters and Roberts; Instructors Bauserman, Cochran, 
Forsythe, and Marshall. 

Mathematics majors must complete 18 hours in mathematics beyond calculus. 
These will ordinarily include Mathematics 240, 241, 246, 251, and 252. The minor 
may be physics, or some other subject approved by the adviser. French or German 
should be taken while in the lower division. 

Lower division students who plan to become majors in the department, and 
who also wish to meet the requirements for teacher certification, should so inform 



r* 



168 



curricula and courses 



their adviser, and must plan their schedules very carefully in order to avoid loss ot 
time. 

Following is a suggested lower division program for prospective majors in 
mathematics. 



FIRST YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

English 1 3 

French or German 3 

Mil. or Air Sci 2-0 

Phys. Ed 1 

Mathematics 3 3 

Mathematics 4 3 

Electives 3 

18-16 



Second Sem. Hr. 

English 2 3 

French or German 3 

Mil. or Air Sci 2-0 

Phys. Ed 1 

Mathematics 5 4 

Electives 3-6 



16-17 



First Sem. 

French or German 3 

Mil. or Air Sci 2-0 

Phys. Ed 0-1 

Mathematics 107 4 

Physics 105 4 

Physics 107 1 

Electives 3 



SECOND YEAR 
Hr. 



Second Sem. Hr. 

French or German 3 

Mil. or Air Sci 2-0 

Phys. Ed 0-1 

Mathematics 108 4 

Physics 106 4 

Physics 108 1 

Electives 3 



17-16 



17-16 



Courses of Instruction 

Pre-College 

The following two courses are offered to enable students to remove entrance 
conditions in mathematics. Each course meets three times per week throughout the 
school year. Neither course carries University credit, although each is considered 
equivalent to three hours per semester in calculating student loads. 

0. Elementary Algebra. I and II. % unit per semester. A two-semester course 
equivalent to first-year high school algebra. Staff 



Plane Geometry. I and II. y 2 unit per semester, 
equivalent to high school plane geometry. 



A two-semester course 
Staff 



Lower Division 

2. Algebra. I, II. 3 hr. PR: 1 unit of algebra. Not open to students with credit 
for Math. «** 11. Staff 

3. College Algebra. I, II. 3 hr. PR: W 2 units of algebra (or Math. 2) and 1 
unit of plane geometry. Staff 

4. Plane Trigonometry. I, II. 3 hr. PR. IV 2 units of algebra (or Math. 2), 
and 1 unit of plane geometrv. Not open to students with credit for Math. 10. 

Staff 

5. Analytic Geometry. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Math. 3 and 4. Staff 

6. Arithmetic for Teachers. II. 3 hr. Staff 

7. Solid Geometry. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Plane geometry. Staff 

8. Elementary Mathematics. I, II. 3 hr. PR: 1 unit of algebra. For students 
planning to major in Economics or Business Adminstration. Mm npi.'ii In 
taudftiiu - with Licdit fui Math 2 ui 11 . Staff 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 169 

9. Elementary Mathematics. I, II. 3 hr. Continuation of Math. 8. Staff 

10. Plane Trigonometry. II. 3 hr. PR: 1 unit of algebra and 1 unit of plane 
geometry. For students who do not plan to take calculus. Not open to stu- 
dents with credit for Math. 4. Staff 

11. Mathematics for Agricultural Students. I, II. 3 hr. PR: One unit of 
algebra and one unit of plane geometry. Not open to students with credit for 
Math. 2 m+. Staff N 

'; 2Z- J. . I X, ±L ( 

Upper Division 

106. Descriptive Astronomy. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 5. Mr. Bauserman 

107. Differential and Integral Calculus. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Math. 5. Staff 

108. Differential and Integral Calculus. I, II. 4 hr. Continuation of Math. 107. 

Staff 

128. Mathematical Theory of Investment. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 3. Primarily 

for students in economics and business administration. Staff 

130. Elementary Theory of Mathematical Statistics. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 107. 

Staff 

238. Modern Geometry. I. 3 hr. PR: Math. 108 or consent of instructor. For high- 
school teachers. Extension of traditional Euclidean plane geometry. Geometry 
of points, lines, triangles, and circles; similarity, inversion, and polars. 

Mr. Cunningham 

239. Modern Geometry. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 108. Introductory concepts of pro- 
jective geometry. Principle of duality, harmonic sets, cross-ratio, conies, 
involution, and metric properties of projective figures are considered syntheti- 
cally. Mr. Cunningham 

240. Differential Equations. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 108. First course. Types of 
ordinary differential equations of first or higher degree and first or higher 
order. Solutions and applications. Not open to students with credit for 
Math. 253. Mr. Davis 

241. Theory of Determinants and Analytic Geometry of Space. I. 3 hr. PR: 
Math. 108. Properties of determinants; application to analytic geometry of 
three dimensions. Types of algebraic surfaces, particularly quadric surfaces; 
different coordinate systems. Mr. Davis 

243. Projective Geometry. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 241. Homogeneous coordinates. 
Linear one-dimensional forms, cross-ratio, complete quadrangle, two-dimen- 
sional forms, perspective, circular points and isotropic lines, line equations, 
conies, plane collineations. Mr. Cunningham 

244. Theory of Equations. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 108. Complex numbers. Division, 
factorization and other properties of polynomials in a field. Theory of equa- 
tions in the field of rational numbers; in the field of real numbers. Elimination, 
resultants, and symmetric functions. Algebraic extensions of a field. Alge- 
braically closed fields. Ruler and compass constructions. Mr. Vest 

245. Vector Analysis. I. 3 hr. PR. Math. 240 (or 253) and 252. Vector definitions 
and operations, differentiation, operator del, integration, generalized coor- 
dinates, irrotational and solenoidal vectors, electrostatic fields, potentials. 

Mr. Stewart 

246. Introduction to Algebraic Theories. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 108 or consent 
of instructor. Polynomials, elementary transformations on rectangular ma- 
trices, equivalence of forms and matrices, linear spaces, and matric poly- 
nomials; groups, rings, and fields. Mr. Peters 

247. Theory of Numbers. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 108. Divisibility, distribution of 
primes, theory of congruences, theory of quadratic residues, arithmetical 



170 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



properties of the roots of unity. Diophantine equations, and the prime 
number theorem. Mr. Vehse 

248. History of Mathematics. I. 3 hr. PR: Math. 5. Ancient Near East arithmetic. 
Euclid's geometrv. Algebras of Babylonians, of Cardano and Tartaglia, 
non-Euclidean geometry, Descartes' work. Continuation of Eudoxus, Newton, 
and Leibnitz. Mr. Vehse 

251. Advanced Calculus. I. 3 hr. PR: Math 108. Partial differentiation, Euler's 
theorem, Taylor's series, Jacobians; maxima and minima, Lagrange's multi- 
pliers; multiple integrals; line and surface integrals. Mr. Stewart 

252. Advanced Calculus. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 251. Continuation of Math. 251, 
Limits and indeterminate forms; infinite series; improper integrals; applica- 
tions of uniform convergence; Gamma and Beta functions; Stirling's formula; 
Fourier series. Mr. Stewart 

253. Advanced Course in Applied Mathematics. I. 3 hr. PR: Math. 108. Ordin- 
ary differential equations with emphasis on linear equations: infinite series, 
Fourier series, solutions of ordinary differential equations by infinite series. Ap- 
plications to engineering problems. Not open to students with credit for 
Math. 240. Staff 

254. Advanced Course in Applied Mathematics. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 253. Elliptic 
integrals. Gamma and Bessel functions, partial derivatives, differentiation under 
integral sign, partial differential equations, vectors, applications to vibrating 
strings, heat flow, electrical flow. Staff 

255. Mathematical Astronomy. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 106 and 240. Development of 
the implications of Kepler's Laws and Newton's Law of gravitation. 

Mr. Davis 

Graduate Division 

308. Theory of Probability. I. 3 hr. PR: Math. 108. Fundamental concepts, 
probability curve and integral, adjustment of observations. Combinatorial 
problems. Binomial, normal, multinomial, and Poisson laws. Distributive 
functions. Moments and characteristics functions. Limits. Applications. 

Mr. Stewart 

309. Group Theory. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 246 or consent of instructor. Order, 
index, coset, normal subgroup, factor group, homomorphism; direct product; 
fundamental theorem of Abelian groups; and Jordan-Holder theorem. 

Mr. Peters 

311. Point-set Topology. I. 3 hr. PR: Math. 252. Transfinite cardinal numbers, 
well-ordered sets, transfinite ordinal numbers, closed and perfect sets, measur- 
able point sets in Borel sense; applications to Riemann and Lebesgue integrals. 

Mr. Roberts 

312. Introduction to Combinatorial Topology. II. 3 hr. PR: Math 252. Linear 
graphs, two-dimensional complexes and manifolds, n-dimensional complexes 
and manifolds, orientable manifolds. The fundamental group and certain 
unsolved problems. Mr. Roberts 

313. Advanced Differential Equations. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 240 and 252. Second- 
order linear equations, Riccati equations, complex variables. Series solutions. 
Equations of Fuchsian type, hypergeometric equation, confluence of singulari- 
ties. Classical equations, applications. Mr. Vest 

314. Tensor Analysis. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 252 and 245. Vector concept developed 
from standpoint of algebraic invariants, surface geometry, tensor operators, 
curvature tensor, Ricci and Bianchi identities, applications of tensors to 
physical phenoma. Mr. Stewart 

315. Calculus of Variations. II. 3 hr. PR- Math. 240 and 252. Maximum and 
minimum value of an integral, shortest distance, the brachistochrone problem, 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 171 






surfaces of revolution of minimum area, conditions for a relative minimum. 
Applications. Mr. Vehse 

351, 352. Algebraic Geometry. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: Math. 243 and 246. 
Characteristic properties and representations of curves and surfaces; algebraic 
correspondences; linear systems; enumerative geometry. Mr. Cunningham 

353. Linear Algebra. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 246 or consent of instructor. Review of 
theory of groups and fields; linear vector spaces including the theory of 
duality; full linear group; bilinear and quadratic forms; and theory of isotropic 
and totally isotropic spaces. Mr. Peters 

357. Fourier Series and Partial Differential Equations. I. 3 hr. PR: Math. 
240 (or 253) and 252. Introductory material, partial differential equations 
of physics, orthogonal sets; solving boundary value problems by Fourier 
series and integrals; uniqueness of solutions; Bessel functions, Legendre poly- 
nomials. Mr. Vest 

358. Operational Methods in Partial Differential Equations. II. 3 hr. PR: 
Math. 240 (or 253) and 252. Laplace transformation, properties and elemen- 
tary applications; problems in partial differential equations, complex variable; 
problems in heat conduction, mechanical vibrations, etc. Sturm-Liouville 
systems. Fourier transforms. Mr. Vest 

360, 361. Differential Geometry and Theory of Surfaces. I, II. 3 hr. per 
semester. PR: Math. 240, 241, 243. Metric properties of space curves and 
surfaces by differential methods. Parametric representation, curvature, torsion, 
trihedrons, geodesies, transformations, conformability, developability, ruled 
surfaces, etc. Mr. Davis 

362, 363. Introduction to Modern Algebra. I. II 3 hr. per semester. PR: Math. 
246 or consent of instructor. Review of concepts from set theory and the 
system of natural numbers; semi-groups and groups; rings, integral domains 
and fields; extensions of rings and fields; elementary factorization theory; 
groups with operators; modules and ideals; and lattices. Mr. Peters 

364, 365. Theory of Functions of Complex Variable. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. 
PR: Math. 240, 252. Complex numbers; functions of a complex variable; 
fundamental theorems of Caucliy; conformal representation with applica- 
tions; analytic continuation; calculus of residues, Gamma, Bessel, and elliptic 
functions. Mr. Vehse 

366, 367. Higher Plane Curves. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: Math. 241, 243. 
Algebraic plane curves. General theory of curves, singularities, relationships, 
associated curves; detailed study of curves of third and fourth order. 

Mr. Stewart 

372, 373. Line Complexes and Cremona Transformations. I, II. 3 hr. per semester 
PR: Math. 241 and 243. Line coordinates, null system, systems of complexes, con- 
gruences, surface theory, and mapping. Plane Cremona transformations, 
introduction to general space theory, opportunities for research. Mr. Davis 

374, 375. Algebraic Surfaces. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: Math 243. Mapping 
of quadric, cubic, quartic, and quintic surfaces on the plane; space trans- 
formations, equivalence, postrdation; curves on a surface, adjoint systems, 
invariants. Staff 

376, 377. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. 
PR: Math. 240 and 252. Review of elementary point set concepts. Necessary and 
sufficient conditions under which operations of previous analytical subjects are 
valid. Different theories of integration. Mr. Vehse 

379. Seminar in Coal Research. I, II. 1-2 hr. PR: Consent. Credit 1 hour per 
semester, maximum credit 2 hours. (In cooperation with other depart- 
ments and the U.S. Bureau of Mines.) 

380. Thesis. I, II. 3 hr. Staff 



172 CURRICULA AND COURSES 

NURSING EDUCATION 

Associate Professor Oswald; Lecturer Babcock 

The Department of Nursing Education offers to graduate nurses a program 
which enables them to function more effectively as professional members of a demo- 
cratic society. 

Nursing Education has as its main objectives the preparation of students to 
meet the challenges presented in the varied, important, and increasing activities in the 
expanding field of health; the development in students of a wide interest in social 
and professional problems, with an ability to share in their solution for an increased 
and enriched professional usefulness; and the preparation of students for democratic 
leadership and creative service through varied types of guided learning experiences in 
Nursing Education. 

Pre-Nursing Curriculum 

Students interested in professional nursing as a career and who plan to enter 
a collegiate school of nursing may take one, two or more \ears of general college work 
as given on pages 128 and 129. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education 

Admission Requirements: Applicants for admission to the Department of Nursing 
Education must: (1) Meet the requirements for admission to the College of Arts and 
Sciences; (2) be graduated from a state accredited school of nursing; (3) be registered 
in one state or hold a temporary permit pending registration; (4) have experience in 
institutional, public health, or private-duty nursing; and (5) take a graduate nurse 
qualifying examination, the results of which will be used to plan individual programs 
and as a guide to advanced standing. 

Advanced Standing: Graduates of accredited schools of nursing may matriculate 
for this degree with advanced standing. Advanced standing may be granted for the 
following: (1) Basic nursing program in an accredited school of nursing. Each stu- 
dent's record will be evaluated individually and advanced standing given according 
to the content and quality of classroom and clinical instruction and experience. An 
official transcript of the school of nursing record must be sent to the Registrar. Stu- 
dents who desire to matriculate with advanced standing should request a School of 
Nursing transcript form when they apply for admission. Thirty semester hours 
represent the average advanced standing allowed for a satisfactory course of study in 
a hospital school of nursing. (2) Military credit— basic, eight and advanced, twelve 
nonduplicate semester hours may be allowed for military service in World War 11 
upon presentation of separation papers to the Registrar. (3) Credit for required 
courses completed in other accredited colleges or universities may be accepted for 
credit. Official transcript of records of work must be sent to the University Registrar 
by the other college, university, or school of nursing. 

Program Requirements: Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing Education are required to complete at least 128 semester hours of credit with 
256 grade points. The Nursing Education major includes at least 24 semester hours of 
professional or allied professional courses, 50 semester hours of general academic, 
scientific, education, and social subjects; a total of 52 semester hours of upper-division 
courses, including the 24 hours required for the major, the 9 hours required for the 
minor, and the electives necessary to total 128 semester hours required for a Bachelor 
of Science Degree. With departmental approval, certain courses in education, sociology, 
social care work, or psychology, may be counted toward the major in Nursing 
Education. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 173 



REQUIRED COURSES 

1. General Education Courses Required: 

English Composition 1 and 2 or Communication 1 and 2 6 hr. 

English (any upper-division course) 6 hr. 

Foreign Language (any one foreign language)* 12 hr. 

Science (any one Physical or Biological Science) 8 hr. 

Sociology 102 or 1 (and any other upper- division course) 6 hr. 

Psychology— 1 or 3 (and any other upper-division course) 6 hr. 

History 1 and 2 or 52 and 53 6 hr. 

(or Humanities 1 and 2—8 hr.) 

50 hr. 

2. Professional Courses Required: 

101— Introduction to Nursing Education 3 hr. 

102— Principles and Methods of Clinical Teaching 3 hr. 

103— Trends in Nursing 3 hr. 

104— Ward Management and Teaching 3 hr. 

108— Social and Health Aspects of Nursing 3 hr. 

Ill— Personnel Policies and Practices 3 hr. 

Electives in Nursing Education or closely allied courses 6 hr. 

24 hr. 
*Or two units for entrance and six hours in the same language. 

3. Major in Nursing Education: The program leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing Education was established to provide an opportunity for more 
thorough preparation of qualified graduate nurses to administer and supervise 
nursing services in a hospital unit. Such a program is fundamental to the under- 
standing of administration, teaching and supervision, and serves as a basis for 
future graduate study, including clinical specialties. The major program offered 
at present is: "Administration and Teaching in the Hospital Unit." 

Courses of Instruction 

Upper Division 

101. Introduction to Nursing Education. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Psychology. Consent. 
An orientation course designed as an introduction to the philosophy, basic 
principles, methods and organization underlying all fields of nursing, with 
emphasis upon teaching, supervision, and administration in schools of nursing. 

Miss Oswald 

102. Principles and Methods of Clinical Teaching. II. 3 hr. PR: N.E. 104, or 
consent. A study of basic principles and methods of teaching from the stand- 
point of Nursing Education, and application to nursing situations, with emphasis 
on clinical teaching, planning, construction, and evaluation of units of work and 
instruction. Mrs. Babcock 

103. Trends in Nursing. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Study of recent developments 
and current professional problems in various fields of nursing and related 
professions in their relation to the nurse and professional organizations. 

Miss Oswald 

104. Ward Management and Teaching. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. An analysis of 
factors involved in the administration of the hospital ward and the principles 
of good ward management; a study of the head nurse's educational responsibili- 
ties including supervisory and teaching methods as applied to bedside teaching 
and total care of the patient in the maintenance of high quality nursing 
service. Emphasis upon the head nurse's responsibility for personal and profes- 
sional growth and her civic obligations as a citizen in the community. Evalua- 
tion of staff and student performance and techniques applicable to ward man- 
agement and teaching are discussed. Mrs. Babcock 



174 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



106. Historical Foundations of Nursing. II. 3 hr. A historical study and review 
of the origins, aims and growth of nursing, with special emphasis on the de- 
velopment of the professional, public health, educational and international 
aspects of nursing. Discussion materials wherever possible will be selected on 
the basis of students' interests. Miss Oswald 

107. Guidance in Nursing. I, II. 3 hr. A survey of principles and procedures of 
guidance applied to the needs and problems confronting students and graduate 
nurses in hospitals and schools of nursing. To assist administrators, teachers 
and supervisors in the more effective use of guidance techniques in the inter- 
pretation of test data in its relation to selection, orientation, educational, social, 
and professional adjustments, remedial measures, counseling interviews and 
individual and group guidance of nursing personnel. Miss Oswald 

108. Social and. Health Aspects of Nursing. I, II. 3 hr. Designed to stress the 
philosophy and principles underlying the integration of the social and health 
aspects of nursing. Practical application in the major clinical services. A study 
of community social and health problems and the function of the medical 
social service department. Miss Oswald 

110. Evaluation Methods in Nursing Education. II. 3 hr. PR: N.E. 101 or 102, 104, 
psychology, and consent. To provide a better understanding of basic aims and 
scientific principles of nursing care of the whole patient as a member of society. 
Underlying educational principles applied to the selection, organization, and 
evaluation of the units of instruction, and the teaching methods in the 
introduction of nursing. Staff 

111. Personnel Policies and Practices. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. The What, Why, 
and How of personnel policies and practices in nursing and in other occupa- 
tions. A comparative analysis of what personnel policies and practices are, 
why they are needed, and how they may become more effective under the prac- 
tices and challenges of democratic administration in any field of nursing. 

Mrs. Babcock 

112. Nursing Procedu*£^-a*\4>-Rgi«tnes. II. 3 hr. PR: N.E. 104 or 111, psychology, 
consent. A study of problems involved in the evaluation, construction, and ad- 
ministration of nursing procedures and routines. Mrs. Babcock 

113. Uegislatiox and Jurisprudence Affecting Nursing. I, II. 3 hr. A survey of 
current legislation affecting nursing, including the State Board of Nurse 
Examiners and other state and federal groups related to nursing. A critical 
study of jurisprudence and the legal aspects of nursing. Miss Oswald 

114. New Developments in Nursing. S. 2 hr. PR: Consent. Designed as a work 
conference around the general theme of Improving Basic Nursing Education. 
Developed around such areas as teaching techniques, curriculum planning, 
social and health integration, and counseling and guidance technique effective 
in nursing. Staff 

115. Pboblems in Nursing. S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. This course is planned to meet 
needs and interests of nurses active in Public Health, Industrial, and Institu 
tional Nursing. Staff 

200. In-Service Education in Nursing. TI. S. 3 hr. A study of staff education pro- 
grams in the various fields of nursing, including orientation programs to in- 
stitutions, agencies and special services. Staff 

201. Growth and Adjustment Related to Health. S. 3 hr. PR: N.E. 101, Psychology 
122. Consent. Designed to studv the relation of social, intellectual, physical, 
and emotional development throughout life. Emphasis upon those principles 
basic to professional nursing practice in all fields. Staff 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 175 

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Curtis, Cresswell, and Stalnaker; Associate Professor Minor; Assistant 
Professors Light, Townsend; Instructors Cross, Green hut, Huffner, Wertheimer. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophy has two main functions: (1) critical analysis of basic concepts, ideas, 
ideals, and beliefs; (2) organization of knowledge, and the development of patterns 
of tested belief for guidance of individual and institutional conduct. 

Courses in philosophy are especially useful: (1) as a valuable background for 
policy-making positions in government, business, schools, and church; (2) as a 
preparation for work in the field of religion; (3) as an indispensable foundation for 
graduate training leading to teaching and research in philosophy; (4) as a general 
education providing conditions for the organization of knowledge and a clearer 
recognition of values. 

The following courses are recommended to be taken in the first two years by 
those preparing to major in philosophy: German or French, physics or biology, 
economics, history or humanities, political science, psychology, and sociology. 

With the adviser's approval, certain courses in political, educational or economic 
theory may be counted toward the major in philosophy. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Courses in psychology are designed for one or more of the following ends; to 
promote a better understanding of human nature and behavior: to lay a foundation 
for graduate professional training: to inculcate useful skills of psychological technology. 

Students desiring to major in psychology should consult the head of the depart- 
ment before making their decision. The following program, designed to give a broad 
background, is recommended as preparation for majoring in psychology. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 1 English 2 Language 3 Language 4 

Language 1 Language 2 Biology 1 Biology 2 

Psychology 3 Psychology 4 Psychology 122 Philosophy 4 

Humanities 1 or Humanities 2 or Mil. or Air Sci. or Genetics 11 

History 1 History 2 Phys. Educ. Mil. or Air Sci. or 

Phys. Educ. Phvs. Educ. Electives Phys. Educ. 

Mil. or Air Sci. 1 Mil. or Air Sci. 2 Electives 

Recommended second-year electives are economics, political science, or sociology. 
Economics 1 and 2 should be taken by those planning to enter personnel work or to 
minor in economics or business administration. 

Courses of Instruction 
philosophy 

Lower Division 

4. Introduction to Philosophy. I. II. 3 hi. Study of living issues in the field of 
philosophy with special emphasis on: (1) philosophic development of scientific 
methods as instrumental to growth of knowldege: (2) value as the basis of per- 
sonal and social policies for diverting ethical use of knowledge. Mr. Minoi 
Vpper Division 

104. Principles of Philosophy. 3 hr. An examination of two types of philosophy, 
naturalism and idealism, the consequences of which are in frequent conflict 
today. A first course in philosophy for juniors and seniors. ^Not for those 
who have credit for Philosophy 4.) Mr. Cresswell 

106. Logic. I. 3 hr. PR: Phil. 4. An examination of formal reasoning and 
scientific methods as means for attaining reliable knowledge. Mr. Cresswell 

107. Fundamentals of Ethics. I. 3 hr. PR: Phil. 4. Critical study of right and 
wrong, of good and bad, in personal conduct. Mr. Minor 

108. Social Ethics. II. 3 hr. PR: Phil. 4. Critical study of basic principles 
used to guide institutions of the community. Mr. Minor 



176 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



110. Philosophy of Science.. II. 3 hr. PR: Philosophy 4, and 8 hr. science. An 
examination of the methods, presuppositions, and concepts of modern science 
For students interested in the influences of science on contemporary thought 
and society. Staff 

112. History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. I. 3 hr. PR: Phil. 4. A survey 
of the period up to Machiavelli. Mr. Cresswell 

113. History of Modern Philosophy. II. 3 hr. PR: Phil. 4. Continuation of Phil. 
112, ending with German Idealism. Mr. Cresswell 

114. Contemporary Philosophy. I. 3 hr. PR: Phil. 4. Critical study of naturalism 
and supernaturalism. Mr. Minor 

115. Contemporary Philosophy. II. 3 hr. PR: Phil. 4. Critical study of human- 
ism, materialism, and oganicism. Mr. Minor 

118. Aesthetics. I. 3 hr. PR: Phil. 4. Critical study of principles of art and 
.. beautv. _, ,,->,/ -, ^ Mr. Minor 

207^ American Philosophy. II, 3 hr. PR: Two courses in Philosophy or consent. 

his course requires the reading of certain American writers, starting with 

soroesof the New England Puritans and concluding with William James. It 

attempt^ to clarify an American tradition, concerned chiefly with moral 

philosophy. Mr. Cresswell 

208. Philosophy of Religion. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Two courses in philosophy. An 
attempt to discover the logically defensible foundations of religion. 

Mr. Cresswell 

212. Medieval Philosophy. II. 3 hr. PR: Phil. 4, 112. One or more philosophers 
of the Middle Ages. Mr. Cresswell 

217. Metaphysics. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Phil. 4, 112, 113. Study of a selected system 
of philosophy. Staff 

218. Epistemology. II. 3 hr. PR: Phil. 4 and 106. Nature, scope, and validity 
of human knowledge. Mr. Cresswell 

221. Axiology. II. 3 hr. PR: Phil. 4 and 107. Critical study of theories of 
value, including investigation of origin, nature, and growth of value. Mr. Minor 

305. Philosophy of History. II. 3 hr. PR: Phil. 4, 106, and consent. Various theories 
of historical development. Mr. Cresswell 






PSYCHOLOGY 

Lower Division 

1. Introduction to Psychology. I, II. 3 hr. Principles of general psychology 
for nonmajors. Staff 

3, 4. General Psychology. I, II. 4 hr. Open to freshmen. Three hours of 
lecture and two hours of laboratory a week. Fundamentals of general 
psychology for majors or those using psychology to satisfy laboratory science 
requirement. Mr. Curtis and Mr. Townsend 

20. Psychology of Personal Efficiency. I, II. 3 hr. For students whose 
scholastic achievement is below capacity. Diagnosis and remedial prac- 
tice in areas which hamper personal or academic efficiency. Especially 
for freshmen and sophomores. Mr. Cross and Staff 

Upper Division > j£^ / 

110. Applied Psychology. II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1 or 3 and 4. Applications of 
psychology 7 in fields of law, medicine, education, and business. Mr. Cross 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES L 



h 



114. Psychology in Personnel., Work. I. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1 or 3 and 4. Techniques 
for selecting and placing personnel; job and worker analysis and classification; 
interviewing; tests of aptitude, proficiency, temperament, and interest. 

Mr. Curtis 

115. Psychology in Industry. II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1, or 3 and 4. Job train- 
ing, employee appraisal, leadership training, motivation and morale, effi- 
cient work methods and conditions, accident prevention, industry and society. 

Mr. Curtis 

116. Social Psychology. I. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1, or 3 and 4. Considers the relation- 
ships of the individual with the groups of which he is a member. Mr. Cross 

122. Child Psychology. I. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1, or 3 and 4. Miss Stalnaker 

125. Mental Hygiene. I. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1, or 3 and 4. The achievement of 
harmonious inter-personal relationships. Mr. Light 

130. Statistical Methods in Psychology. I. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1, or 3 and 4 
Analysis and interpretation of psvchological data. Mr. Townsend 

132. Psychology of Advertising and Selling. II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1 or 3 and 4. 

Mr. Curtis 

201. Physiological Psychology. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psychology 3, 4, and Zoology 
171 or equivalent. The organic basis for psychological activities such as 
perception, emotion, motivation, and learning. Mr. Townsend 

205. Individual Differences. 2 hr. II. PR: One course in psychology. Nature and 
extent of the differences among individuals in psychological traits such as 
intelligence and personality, as influenced by inheritance, schooling, age, sex, 
culture. Primarily for students in psychology and education. Mr. Curtis 

206. Learning and Motivation. I or II 3 hr. PR: Psychology 3 and 4 or equivalent. 

Staff 
218. Psychology of Personality. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1 or 3 and 4. 

Mr. Light 
222. Psychology of Adolescence. II. 3 hr. PR: Two courses in psychology or consent. 

Mr. Light 

224. Mental Measurement. I. 4 hr. PR: Psych. 122. Individual testing; theory and 
practice in Binet and Wechsler intelligence tests. Miss Stalnaker 

225. Mental Measurement. II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1, or 3 and 4, and 130. Group 
testing. Miss Stalnaker 

226. Advanced Experimental Psychology. II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 3, 4, 130. Design 
and conduct experiments; lectures and laboratory. Mr. Townsend 

229. Abnormal Psychology. II. 3 hi. PR: One upper-division course in psychology. 

Miss Stalnaker ' 
234. Problems in Child Psychology" II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 122, and 224 or 225. 
Students will select individual problems in child behavior. Miss Stalnaker 

236. Psychology of Adjustment. I. 3 hr. PR: Two courses in psychology or consent. 
Dynamic principles of human personality adjustment. Mr. Cross 

Clinical Psychology. II. 4 hr. PR: Psych. 224. Miss Stalnaker 

History of Psychology. II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1, or 3 and 4. Mr. Townsend 

245, 246. Seminar. I, II. 2 hr. Critical study of selected topics. For seniors and 
7 graduates. Staff 

250. Practicum in Student-personnel Psychology. II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 236 or 
consent. Diagnostic and remedial techniques for dealing with reading and 
work-study-skill efficiency; and personal-social-emotional adjustment. 

Mr. Cross 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



1*1 
I 



-26-h Practicum in Student-personnel Psychology. I or II. 1 or 2 hr. Directed 
practice in student-personnel counseling. Continuation of Psych. 250. 

Mr. Cross 

-26*fc Practicum in Vocational Appraisal. 1, II. 3 In. PR: Consent. Principles 
and procedures in appraising educational and vocational fitness. Supervised 
practice in testing and counseling college students presenting educational and 
vocational problems. Mr. Cross 

260. Statistical Methods in Psychology. II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 130. Sampling 
and reliability, regression and prediction, linear, partial, and multiple cor- 
relation. Required for Master's degree. Mr. Townsend 



Graduate Division 

301, 302. Special Problems in Research. 1, 11. 
303, 304. Thesis. I, II. 2-3 hr. per semestei . 



1-3 hr. per semester. 



Statf 
Staff 



310. Projective Techniques. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 224, 236, and consent. 
Survey of the projective techniques used in psychodiagnostics, including the 
Thematic Apperception Test, the Szondi lest, and the Rorschach Test. Spe- 
cial emphasis will be given the Rorschach Test. Mr. Light 

311. Practicum in Projective Techniques. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psychology 310 or 
equivalent. Supervised practice in scoring and interpretation of the Rorschach 
Ink Blot Test and the Thematic Apperception Test. Mr. Light 

316. Counseling and Psychotherapy. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psychology 224 and 229 or 
equivalent. Principles underlying Freudian and non-directive therapy, play 
therapy and psychodrama. Mr. Light 

317. Practicum in Counseling and Psychotherapy. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psychology 
316 or equivalent. Supervised experience in psychotherapeutic techniques 
used by the psychologist in a clinic setting. Mr. Light 

330. Systems of Psychology. II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1, or 3 and 4, and one 

Mr. Curtis 




Systems of Psychology. 
course in philosophy. 

PHYSICS 






II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1, 



Professors Colwell, Ford, and Thomas; Assistant Professors Buchanan, Gunton, 
Ollom, and Williamson; Instructors Farr and Rexroad. 

Various courses offered in Physics are designed to meet the needs of students 
in the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Agriculture, Engineering, and the School of 
Medicine. 

Suggested Curriculum for A.B. with Major in Physics 



First Sem. 
Mil. or Air 
P.E. 
Eng. 1 
Math. 3 
Math. 4 
Physics 1 
Physics 3 



FIRST YEAR 
Hr. Second Sem. 



SECOND YEAR 



Mil. or Air 2 
P.E. 
Eng. 2 
Math. 5 
French or 
German 
Physics 2 
Physics 4 



16 
I 



Hr 

2 
1 
3 

4 

3 
3 

1 

17 



First Sem. 
Mil. or Air 3 
Math. 107 
Physics 109 
Chem. 1 
French or 
German 
Elective 



Hr. Second Sem. 



Mil. or Air 4 
Math. 108 
Physics 110 
Chem. 2 
French or 
German 
Elective 



Hr. 

2 
4 
2 
4 

3 
3 






- 






18 

/ r 

. - I 



IP 






THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 179 



THIRD 


YEAR 




FOURTH 


YEAR 




First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem 


\. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Math. (200) 3 


Math. (200) 3 


* Physics 


(200) 


3 


♦Physics (200) 


3 


Phvsics (100) 3 


Physics (100) 3 


Physics 


(200) 


3 


Physics (200) 


3 


t* Physics (200) 3 


t* Physics (200) 3 


Physics 


(200) 


3 


Physics (200) 


3 


Elective 3 


Elective 3 


Elective 




3 


Elective 


3 


Elective 3 


Elective 3 


Elective 




3 


Elective 


3 



Elective 2 Elective 2 

17 17 15 15 

*Physics 249, 250 are required and must be taken during the third or fourth 
year. 

tE.E. 250, 251 may be substituted for Physics (200) courses. 

Physics (200) means courses numbered from 200 to 299. Similarly for Mathematics 
(200). All Physics majors should take at least 6 hours of German and 6 hours of 
French. 

Courses of Instruction 

Lower Division 

1. Introductory Physics. I. 3 hr. PR: Plane geometry and algebra. Required 
of all agricultural students and all students in the School of Medicine. Must 
be accompanied by Physics 3. Mechanics, sound, and heat. Staff 

2. Introductory Physics. II. 3 hr. PR: Physics 1. Must be accompanied by 
Physics 4. Electricity, magnetism, and light. Staff 

3, 4. Introductory Physics Laboratory. I, II. 1 hi. per semester. Accompanies 
and is required of all students who take Physics 1 and 2. Mr. Farr and Staff 

Upper Division 

105. General Physics. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Must have had or be taking calculus. 
Required of all candidates for engineering degrees and recommended for all 
students who major in mathematics. Not open to students who have credit for 
Physics 1. Phvsics 107 must accompany. Mechanics, sound and heat. Staff 

106. General Physics. II. 4 hr. Continuation of Physics 105. Not open to stu- 
dents who have credit in Physics 2. Light, electricity and magnetism. Physics 
108 must accompany. Staff 

107. 108. General Physics Laboratory. I, II. 1 hr. per semester. Companion 

courses for Physics 105 and 106. Mr. Farr and Staff 

109, 110. A Problem Course in General Physics. I, II. 2 hr. per semester. PR: 
Must have had or be taking calculus. Open to students who have taken 
Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4, or equivalent: not open to students who have taken 
Physics 105, 106, 107, and 108. Mr. Williamson 

113, 114. Introductory Radio. I, II. 3 hr. PR: 1 year of college phvsics. 

Mr. Rexroad 

116. Photography. II. 3 hr. PR: 1 year of college physics. 1 year of college 
chemistry. The physics and chemistry of photography with practical applica- 
tions. Mr. Farr 

117, 118. Meteorology. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: 1 year of college physics. 

The physical processes underlying observed weather phenomena. 

Mr. Williamson 

221. Light. I. 3 hr. PR: 10 hours of college physics, trigonometry. Work in 

optical instruments, spectrometry, interferometry, and polarization. Mr. Ford 



180 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



222. Heat. II. 3 hr. PR: 10 hours of college physics, calculus. Phenomenological 
study of heat. (Not given in 1953-54.) Staff 

225, 226. Introduction to Modern Physics. I. II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: 10 hours 
of college physics, calculus. Particle analysis, phenomena connected with the 
structure of the atom. Mr. Ford 

231, 232. Theoretical Mfchamcs. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: 10 hours of col 
lege physics, calculus. Theorems and problems in intermediate mechanics. 

Mr. Colwell 

233, 234. Introductory Electricity and Magnetism. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. 
PR: 10 hours college physics, calculus. Electrostatics, magnetostatics, network 
analysis, introduction to electrodynamics, and applications. Mr. Rexroad 

241, 243, 245, 247. Physics Seminar. I. 1 hr. Open to seniors and graduates. 
Discussion of modern research in physics. Mr. Colwell 

242, 244, 246, 248. Physics Seminar. II. 1 hr. Similar ro Physics 241, 243, 245. 

and 247. Mr. ColwelJ 

249, 250. Intermediate Laboratory. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: 10 hours ol 
college physics, calculus. Detailed techniques in experimental physics. 

Mr. Ford. 

255, 256. Physics Seminar. S I, S II. 2 hr. 10 hours of college physics, 1 year col- 
lege mathematics. Selected topics in modern physics. Not open to physics 
majors. Staff 

257. Photography. S I. 3 hr. PR: One vear of physics or equivalent. Open only 
to majors in Education. Mr. Farr 

258. Light. S II. 3 hr. PR: One year of physics or equivalent. Open only to majors 
in Education. Mr. Ford 

261, 262. Matter and Its Constituents. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: 10 hours of 
college physics, calculus. Molecular, liquid state, and solid state, physics. 
I £-2^ Jl(,3 -lid . £iiJ t< C uQTto N JO Apl-LIEP P\ T, ZZT ^ ■ Mr. Gunton 

287, 288. Introduction to Mathematical Physics. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: 
10 hours of college physics, calculus. General methods of setting up and solving 
physical problems. Mr. Thomas 



N 






Graduate Division 



371, 372. Advanced Classical Mechanics. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Calculus, Physics, 231, 232. 
The application of advanced mechanics to electron and nuclear motions. 

Mr. Ollom 

379. Seminar in Coal Research. I, II. 1 or 2 hr. PR: Consent. Credit 1 hour 
per semester, maximum credit 2 hours. (In cooperation with other departments 
and the U. S. Bureau of Mines). Staff 

381, 382. Physical Optics. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: Physics 221, differential 

equations. (Omitted in 1953-54) . / Mr. Ford 

/ "77/ ■ *- 

383, $ 84. Kinetic Theory of Gases. 1, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: 10 hours of 

college physics, calculus. Boltzmann distribution, viscosity diffusion, thermal 
conductivity, specific heat. Mr. Buchanan 

385, 386. Quantum Mechanics. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: Physics 225, 226 or 
equivalent. Schrodinger's equations, hydrogen atom, perturbation, molecular 
forces. Mr. Thomas 

387, 388. Differential Equations of Physics. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: Physics 
287. 288, differential equations. Application of differential equations to physical 
problems. Mr. Thomas 

389, 390. Nuclear Physics. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: Physics 226, 226. Theory of 
nuclear forces, transformation, energy levels. Mr. Buchanan 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



181 



391, 392. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: Physics 
233, 234, differential equations. Wave propagation, electrodynamics of charged 
particles. Mr. Thomas 



397, 398. Research. I, II. 
structor. 



■6 hr. per semester. PR: Consent of supervising in 

Mr. Col well 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professors Frasure, Stewart, and Sturm*; Assistant Professors Mann, Ross, White, and 

Williams; Instructor Liss. 

Students who expect to select political science as their major subject should, 
while in the lower division, receive credit for Polital Science 5 and 106, History 
1, 2, 52, 53, and Economics 1 and 2 or Sociology 1. Humanities 1, 2, may be 
substituted for History 1, 2. Political Science 5, 104, and 106 constitute the basic 
work in this department and they, or their equivalent, are prerequisite to all courses 
in the upper division. Political Science 104, 106, 219, and 220 are required of all 
majors. The major requirement is 24 hours in upper-division courses. There should 
be a first minor of 12 hours in upper-division courses in history or economics and a 
second minor of 6 hours in upper-division courses in another subject. With approval 
of the departmental adviser, part of the required work in the major may be taken 
in the College of Law. 



Courses Suggested for Political Science Majors 



First Sem. 
English 1 
> Science 
French or 
German 
^ History 1 or 
Humanities 1 
Mil. or Air 1 



FIRST 
Hr. 
3 



Phys. educ 



YEAR 
Second Sem. 
English 2 
Science 
French or 

German 
History 2 or 

Humanities 
Mil. or Air 2 
Phys. educ. 



Hr. First Sem. 

3 Polit. Sci. 5 

4 French or 

German 

3 History 52 

3 Economics 1 

! 4 Psychology 1 
2 Sociology 

1 Mil. or Air 



SECOND YEAR 

Hr. Second Sem. 
3 Polit. Sci. 106 



Hr. 



1 
3 or 



French or 

German 
History 53 
Economics 2 
Philosophy 4 
Mil. or Air 4 or 

Physical educ. 



Physical educ. 1 Electives 1 or 2 



Max. hr. 



17 



17 



ourses of Instruction 34 

Loiver Division^ 



18 



DBMOdKbT /(L Go**' vt5 



>/0. Principles and Practices of Government; American Federal System. 
3 hr. primarily for sophomores. 



IK 



I, II. 

Staff 






Upper Division 

101. Introduction to Government. I. 11 3 hr. (Exclusively for students in the 

College of Agriculture and College of Engineering) . A consideration of the 

basic principles and operation of national, state, and local government in the 

United States. Staff 

104. Contemporary European Governments. I. 3 hr. Emphasis upon Great 
Britain, France, Italy, and Russia. Comparative analysis is made of con- 
stitutions, political structures, and functions. Required of majors. 

Mr. Ross and Mr. Williams 

106. American, State, and Local Government. I, II. 3 hr. Survey of legal basis, 
structure, and functions of state government and relations of state with its 
local units and with Federal Government. Required of majors. Miss Mann 

*On leave of absence 1952-53. 

34Reg-ular electives for Arts and Sciences students. 

35Prerequisite to all upper-division work in the department. 



182 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



107. American City Government. II. 3 hr. Organization, functions, and problems 
of municipal government and of municipal relations with other levels of 
government. Miss Mann 

110. The Government and Administration of West Virginia. I, II. 3 hr. A 
study of the organization and operation of the West Virginia state government. 

Miss Mann 

122. American Constitutional Principles. II. 3 hr. U.S. Constitution as in- 
terpreted by Supreme Court. Treatment is analytical rather than historical. 
Text supplemented by some leading cases. Primarily for pre-Law students. 

Mr. White 

151. Current Problems in American Government. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 105 or 
consent. This course deals with contemporary problems of the federal gov- 
ernment. Required readings will be mostly contemporary newspapers, maga- 
zines, and government documents. Mr. Ross 

200. American Political Institutions. I. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 5 or consent ol 
instructor. Development of Constitution, Congress, Presidency, and Supreme 
Court as institutions with special attention to current problems and issues. 

Mr. Sturm 

203. Principles and Practices of State and Local Government. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 5 
or equivalent. A study of the structure and functions of state and local 
government. Miss Mann 

207. The Administrative Process. I. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 5 or consent of instructor. 
Functions and theory of internal adminstration emphasizing organization and 
coordination, executive leadership, planning finance, and personnel. Mr. Sturm 

208. The Administrative Process. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol Sci. 5 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Legal basis of administration with attention to public officers, powers, and 
procedures ol administrative authorities, enforcement methods, remedies, and 
judicial control. Mr. Sturm 

210. British Government and Practical Policies. II. 3 hr. Intensive study of 
British government with emphasis upon both internal and foreign policies, 
mostly during twentieth century. Mr. Frasure 

213. Modern Dictatorships. I. 3 hr. Politically undemocratic governments. Pro- 
vides background of dictatorships generally, followed by treatment of several 
modern dictatorships. Mr. Frasure 

219. History of Political Thought: Plato to Machiavelli. I. 3 hr. Political 
theories from Greeks to Sixteenth Century. Required of majors. Mr. Williams 

220. History of Political Thought: Machiavelli to the Present. II. 3 hr. 
PR: Pol. Sci. 219 or consent of instructor. Political theories from Machiavelli 
to present. Required of majors. Mr. Williams 

221. Recent and Contemporary Political Thought. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 219 
and 220 or consent of instructor. Political theories from 1850 to present in- 
cluding liberalism, socialism, communism, fascism, and democracy. 

Mr. Williams 

223. International Law. I. 3 hr. Law governing relations between nations, 
including development of rules, means of enforcement, and conflicts be- 
tween theory and practice. Mr. White 

224. American Political Theory. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 219 and 220 or consent 
of instructor. A survey of major American political ideas and their influence 
upon society and government from the seventeenth century to the present. 

Mr. Williams 

225. American Constitutional Law and Theory. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 5 or 
consent of instructor. Basic principles of American constitutional law as de- 
veloped through judicial interpretation with special emphasis on constitutional 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 183 

theories and national development. Primarily for seniors and graduate stu- 
dents. Mr. Sturm 

230. Political Parties and Electoral Processes. I. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 5 or con- 
sent of instructor. Critical study of functioning of political parties in the 
United States, including processes of nominating candidates and conducting 
elections. Mr. Ross 

231. Public Opinion and Propaganda. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 5 or consent of in- 
structor. Analysis of techniques of sampling and measuring public opinion; 
detection of propaganda, its nature and content. Mr. Ross 

240. Contemporary Governments of the (British) Commonwealth. II. 3 hr. A 
comparative study of the nature and development of political ideas and 
institutions in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa with some 
attention to Eire, India and Pakistan. Mr. Williams 

260. International Relations. I. 3 hr. Introduction to contemporary world 
politics. Just enough background to make present-day international affairs 
more understandable Mr. Frasure 

261. International Relations. II. 3 hr. Emphasis upon international organiz- 
ation with most concern given to agencies created since close of World War 
II. Some reference to development of international law and League of 
Nations. (Continuation of Polit. Sci. 260). Mr. Frasure 

290. Research Materials and Methods in Political Science. I, II. 2 hr. A study of 
basic source materials in the various fields of political science and of the 
techniques and methods of government research. Required of majors. Staff 

Graduate Division 

301. Methods of Research in Political Science. I. 3-4 hr. Mr. Frasure 

302. Methods of Research in Political Science. II. 2-4 hr. Mr. Frasure 

303. Selected Problems in International Relations. I. 2-4 hi. Mr. Frasure 

304. Selected Problems in International Relations II. 2-4 hr. Mi. Frasure 

307. Selected Problems in State and Local Government. I. 2-4 br. Miss Mann 

308. Selected Problems in State and Local Government. II. 2-4 hr. Miss Mann 

309. Selected Problems in Public Administration. I. 2-4 hr. Mr. Sturm 

310. Selected Problems in Public Administration. II. 2-4 hr. Mr. Sturm 

311. Selected Problems in Political Theory. I. 2-4 hr. Mr. Williams 

312. Selected Problems in Political Theory. II. 2-4 hr. Mr. Williams 
360. Thesis. I, II. 2-6 hr. Staff 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Professors Spiker, Ashburn, and Manning; Associate Professors McBride and Mitrani; 

Assistant Professors Herrera and Singer; Instructors Frere, Simonette, and Wade. 

Courses 1 and 2 or two years of high-school credit will be required for entrance 
to courses 5, 6, 103, and 104. Usually students who have had two years' study of the 
language in high school should take courses 5 and 6. Students who have done three 
years of work in high school should consult the departmental adviser before 
enrolling. 

Students whose grades have consistently fallen below "B" in language work in 
the lower division should not select Romance Languages as a major subject. 



184 



ClURRICULA AND COURSES 



No student who has not completed French 109, 110, at least six hours in 
courses 115, 116, 118, and French 217 and 231 or Spanish 109, 110, 211, 212, 221, and 
222 will be recommended as a teacher oi the subjects. The following courses are 
rr< mended as a minor if a speaking knowledge of the language is desired: French 
L „ 1U4, 109, 110, and 231 Danish 103, 104. 109, and 110. 

Program for Major Students 

In order to be recommended by this department for the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts a student should have completed, in addition to special requirements 
for the A.B Degree, at least 24 hours of upper-division courses in one of the 
following combinations: 
FRENCH: 103, 104, 10", 110, 115, 116. 118, 217. 221, 222, and 23 1; Spanish or 

Italian (6 to 12 hours) 
SPANISH: 103, 104, 109. 110, 211, 212 221, and 222: French or Italian (6 to 12 

hours) 



FIRST YEAR 

Hr. 

One Romance language 6 

English 1 and 2 6 

Laboratory science 8 

Mil. or Air science (when required) or 

Physical Education 2 

Humanities I and II or 

Electives 8 to 14 



SECOND YEAR 

Hr. 

Two Romance languages or 12 hr. 
in a single language 12 

Mil. or Air science (when required) or 
Physical Education 2 

Electives from the General Course 
Program and lower-division pre- 
paration for minor sub- 
jects 18 to 22 



Maximum hours allowed 



36 



36 



THIRD YEAR 



French or Spanish 109 and 110 

(if not completed in second year) 6 
French 115 and 116 or 11 K or 

Spanish 21 1 and 212 6 

Minor subject and electives 22 



FOURTH YEAR 

French or Spanish 221 and 222 6 

French 231 or elective in Spanish .... 3 
Minor subject and electives 2' 



Maximum hours allowed 36 

Courses of Instruction 

FRENCH 

Loxver Division 

1. Elementary French. I, II. 3 hr. 

2. Elementary French. I, II. 3 hr Continuation ol French 1. 

5. Intermediate French. I, II. 3 hr. Reading of modern French prose. 

6. Intermediate French. II. 3 hr. Continuation of French 5. 



36 



Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 



Upper Division 

103. Elementary Conversation. I. 3 hr. PR: 6 hours of French or equivalent. Staff 

104. La Langue Pratiqie. II. 3 hr. PR: 6 hours of French or equivalent. Staff 

109. Grammar and Pronunciation. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hours of French or equivalent. 
For sophomores or juniors. Mr. Mitrani 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 185 

110. Advanced Conversation. II. 3 hr. PR: French 109 or equivalent. For sopho- 
mores and juniors. Mr. Mitrani 

115. The Classical School. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hours of French or equivalent. 

Mr. Spiker or Mr. Manning 

116. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. II. 3 hr. PR: 12 hours of French 
or equivalent. Mr. McBride 

118. Literature of thf Nineteenth Century. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hours of French 
or equivalent. Mr. McBride 

217. French Civilization. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hours of French. Mr. Spiker 

221. The Romantic Movement. I. 3 hr. PR: French 115. Mr. Spiker 

222. French Realism. II. 3 hr. PR: French 118. Mr. Singer 

*229. Literature of the 16th Century. I. 3 hr. PR: 18 hours of French. Mr. Spiker 

231. Phonetics and Pronunciation. II. 3 hr. PR: 18 hours of French or equival- 
ent. Mr. Manning 

237. Moliere. II. 3 hr. PR: French 115. Mr. Spiker 

244. Explication de textes. II. 3 hr. PR: French 109 and 110. Mr. Manning 

*290. Old French. II. 3 hr. Mr. Manning 

Graduate Division 

393. Special Topics. I. 3-5 hr. Themes in French Literature and Culture. Staff 
SPANISH 
Lower Division 

1. Elementary Spanish. I, II. 3 hr. 31^4 (C0<^* M V*> ' Staff 

2. Elementary Spanish. I, II. Continuation of Spanish 1. Staff 

5. Intermediate Spanish. I. 3 hr. Reading of modern Spanish prose. Staff 

6. Intermediate Spanish. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Spanish 5. Staff 

Upper Division 

103. Elementary Conversation. I. 3 hr. PR: 6 hours of Spanish, or equivalent. 

Mr. Herrera 

104. La Lengua Practica. II. 3 hr. PR: 6 hours of Spanish, or equivalent. 

Mr. Herrera 

109. Grammar and Conversation. I. 3 hr. For sophomores or juniors. Mr. Ashburn 

110. Advanced Conversation. II. 3 hr. PR: Spanish 109, or equivalent. Mr. Ashburn 

211. Nineteenth Century Literature to 1870. I. 3 hr. PR: Spanish 5 and 6 or 
equivalent. r> f^ £ caiJ, So Mr. Singer 

212. Spanish Literature Since 1870. II. PR: Spanish 5 and 6 or equivalent. 

Mr. Singer 

216. Civilization and Culture. II. 3 hr. PR: 12 hours of Spanish or equivalent. 

Mr. Ashburn 

217. Spanish American Literature and Culture. I. 3 hr. PR: Spanish 5 and 
6 or equivalent. Mr. Mitrani 

218. Spanish American Literature and Culture. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Course 217. 
PR: Spanish 5 and 6 or equivalent. Mr. Mitrani 

*Not given in 1953-54. 



186 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



221. Literature of the Golden Ace. I. 3 hr. PR: 18 hours of Spanish, or equiva- 
lent. Mr. Mitrani 

222. The Golden Age after Lope de Vega. II. 3 hr. PR: Spanish 221. Mr. Mitrani 

*223. Estudios de Estilo. 1. 3 hr. PR: 18 hours of Spanish, or equivalent. 

Mr. Ashburn 
*224. Explicacion de textos. II. 3 hr. PR: 18 hours of Spanish, or equivalent. 

Mr. Ashburn 
291. Cervantes. I. 3 hr. Mr. Singer 

*295. Sixteenth Century Literature. I. 3 hr. Mr. Ashburn 

*296. Old Spanish. II. 3 hr. Mr. Ashburn 

Graduate Division 

392. Special Topics. II. 1-3 hr. Themes in Spanish literature and culture. 

Staff 
ITALIAN 
Lower Division 

1. Elementary Italian. I. 3 hr. Mr. Simonette 

2. Elementary Italian. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Italian 1. Mr. Simonette 

5. Intermediate Italian. I. 3 hr. Reading of modern Italian prose. 

Mr. Simonette 

6. Intermediate Italian. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Italian 5. Mr. Simonette 

Upper Division 

109. Composition and Conversation. I. 3 hr. Mr. Simonette 

110. Advanced Conservation. II. 3 hr. Mr. Simonette 

115. Italian Literature. I. 3 hr. General survey. Mr. Simonette 

116. Italian Literature. II. 3 hr. Continuation of course 115. Mr. Simonette 

211. One Italian Author. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hours of Italian, or equivalent. 

Mr. Simonette 
*212. Dante. II. 3 hr. PR: 12 hours of Italian, or equivalent. Mr. Simonette 



,31< SOCIAL WORK h 



Associate Professor Fulton; Assistant Professors Loomis, Walcott, and Whitney; 
Lecturers Hobbs, Johnson, Lawless, Layman, Maxwell, Millington, Pickett, 
Rogers, Rhudy, Serotkin, Sleeth, and Shaw. 

General Statement 

Since its inception in 1939 the Department of Social Work has provided curricula 
and instruction which have been in accord with the best professional school standards. 
The Department is a member of the American Association of Schools of Social Work, 
and the curricula have been developed on the basis of the best experience of the 
Association and its constituent member schools. 

To young people interested in a career of service, social work offers interesting 
and varied duties, and opportunities for full use of intelligence, knowledge and good 
will. The field is uncrowded — there is a wide range of opportunities for placement 
and promotion. The present demand for social workers with full graduate training 
far outruns the supply, and the long-range outlook is favorable. Today trained 

*Not given in 1953-54. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 18; 



social caseworkers are needed in public assistance, public and private child-caring 
agencies, family welfare agencies, hospitals and clinics, medical departments of 
Veterans Administration stations, and other welfare agencies. Supervisors, admin- 
istrators and community-organizing workers are needed in all areas of social work. 
The generic training offered at West Virginia University is designed to equip 
students with the basic preparation needed to qualify for these jobs and to advance 
in status and usefulness in the profession. 

THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

Professional social work education is on a graduate basis. Students who are 
planning a career in social work and who expect promotion and recognition in the 
profession, must obtain at least one year of graduate work, and should complete full 
training for the Master of Social Work Degree. The goal of graduate training is to 
enable students to develop the skills with which people are effectively helped to 
achieve the best that is within them — whether helped individually, in groups, or as 
communities planning toward improved facilities for human welfare. As part of the 
development of these skills, the student must obtain a comprehensive understanding 
of welfare programs and organizations, how they grow and are improved. 

Requirements for the Professional Certificate of Social Work 

The Professional Certificate of Social Work is awarded to students who have 
completed 30 hours of graduate social work courses including 10 semester hours of 
field work, and who have met all other requirements of the Graduate School. Full- 
time students can complete the work in 10i/ 2 months. The normal schedule consists 
of one semester of classroom work; a block of full-time field work, one semester in 
length; and a second classroom period of six weeks. 

Requirements for the Master of Social Work Degree 

For most students the requirements for the Master of Social Work degree can be 
met in one year after completion of the requirements for the certificate. 

(For further information consult the Department of Social Work Announcements 
or the Graduate School Announcements). 

Field Work 

Field work is required of all candidates for the graduate degrees. It is an integral 
part of the curriculum; its objective is to provide each student an opportunity to de- 
velop skill in practice and to gain a deepened understanding of human behavior, 
increased self-discipline, insight into his own role in the helping process, and a sense 
of professional responsibility. Placements are made in county and district offices of 
the Department of Public Assistance, family service agencies, child-caring agencies 
home service departments of American Red Cross chapters, the medical division of 
Veterans Administration, mental health clinics, and other approved agencies. Assign- 
ments are made to the same agency for the entire semester unless in exceptional 
instances and on the basis of individual needs other plans seem more desirable. 

Admission Requirements 

Upper Division 

Students are admitted to upper division work in the Department of Social Work: 
(1) who have completed 58 or more semester hours in an accredited educational 
institution with a total of 12 semester hours in economics, political science, psychology, 
sociology and history; and (2) who have made written application approved by the 
Department. Application forms may be obtained from the head of the Department. 

Graduate Division 

Students are admitted for graduate study in the Department of Social Work who 
meet all of the following requirements: 



188 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



1. Graduation with a bachelors' degree from West Virginia University or from 
another accredited institution. 

2. Admission to the Graduate School. 

3. Completion of the preprofessional curriculum at West Virginia University; or 
satisfactory completion of courses in social science, totaling at least 24 semester hours, 
including not less than 12 semester hours in one of the following fields: economics, 
political science, sociology, psychology, or history. Students who have not fulfilled 
these social science requirements may be admitted on condition that they complete 
them before they become eligible for a graduate degree. The head of the department 
determines the selection of courses to meet the undergraduate deficiencies. 

4. Approval by the Committee on Admissions of the Department, based on 
satisfactory evidence of personal characteristics which give promise of usefulness in 
the profession of social work. 

Application Procedures 

Upper Division 

Students in West Virginia University should make application for admission to 
the Department on forms obtained from the Department. Students from other 
institutions should (1) request an application blank from the Registrar for admission 
to the University; (2) request the registrar of the institution previously attended to 
send a complete official transcript directly to the Registrar of the Universtiy; and (3) 
make application for admission to the Department of Social W T ork. 

Graduate Division 

Written application for admission to the Department of Social Work is made on 
forms which may be obtained from the Department. All applicants must also apply 
for admission to the Graduate School on a form supplied by the Registrar. Students 
from institutions other than West Virginia University must have a complete transcript 
of their credits forwarded to the Registrar. 

Prospective students are requested to make application as far in advance of the 
date they wish to enroll as is possible. The first-year program is begun in September. 
Second year students will be admitted to begin work in July (at the beginning of the 
second summer term) or in September. 

THE UNDERGRADUATE PREPROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM 

The preprofessional curriculum emphasizes liberal arts education. It offers, to 
juniors and seniors in the college, a limited number of social work courses to be taken 
concurrently with a concentration in the social sciences, based on a lower division 
foundation of general education. It has been developed for three classes of students: 
(1) those who are preparing for graduate training in social work; (2) students who 
wish to qualifv for positions for which graduate education is not now required; and 
(3) students who wish to acquire an understanding of the field of social work as part 
of their general education, or with a view to service on agency boards, committees and 
community projects. Social work courses are available also to students from other 
departments who wish to include knowledge of this field in their preparation for 
educational counseling, psychology, recreation, etc. 

The general plan of the preprofessional social work curriculum is: (a) two lower 
division years of general education, including beginning courses in the social sciences; 
(b) two upper division years during which the student concentrates in the social 
sciences and majors in the Department of Social Work. It is recommended that the 
student complete, during the four college years, a total of 50 or 60 hours in the 
social sciences, including political science, economics, sociology, history, social work, and 
psychology. 

Upon the completion of this curriculum and all other requirements of the College 
of Arts and Sciences, the student will be eligible for a B.S. Degree with a major in 
social work. 

The following courses are suggested for the four-year preprofessional curriculum: 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



189 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 
Biol. 1— General Biology or 

Psych. 3— General Psychology ... 4 hr. 

Hum. 1— General Intr. Course .... 4 hr. 

Eng. 1— Comp. & Rhetoric 3 hr. 

Foreign Language 3 hr. 

Phys. Ed. (men and women) 1 hr. 

Military or Air Science (men) .... 2 hr. 



Second Semester 
Biol. 2— General Biology or 

Psvch. 2— General Psychology ... 4 hr. 

Hum. 2— General Intr. Course 4 hr. 

Eng. 2— Comp. & Rhetoric 3 hr. 

Foreign Language 3 hr. 

Phys. Ed. (men and women) 1 hr. 

Military or Air Science (men) .... 2 hr. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 

Foreign Language (if needed) 3 hr. 

Soc. 1— Intro, to Sociology 3 hr. 

Econ. 1— Prin. of Econ 3 hr. 

Psv. 1— Intro, to Psychology 3 hr. 

Eng. 5- Am. Lit 3 hr. 

Hist. 52— Growth Amer. Nat 3 hr. 

Phys. Ed. (women) 1 hr. 

Military or Air Science (men) .... 2 hr. 

Total not to exceed 18 hr. 



Second Semester 

Foreign Language (if needed) 3 hr. 

Soc. 2— Contemp. Social Prob 3 hr. 

Econ. 2— Prin. of Eton 3 hr. 

Pol. Sc. 5— Am. Fed. System 3 hr. 

Zool. 171— Human Physiol 4 hr. 

Hist. 53— Growth Amer. Nat 3 hr. 

Phys. Ed. (women) 1 hr. 

Military or Air Science (men) .... 2 hr. 

Total not to exceed 18 hr. 



JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 

Soc. 210-Marriage & the Family .. 3 hr. 

S.W. 230-Hist. of Soc. Work .'.... 3 hr. 

Psy. 122-Child Psychology 3 hr. 

Genetics 111 2 hr. 

Electi\es 6 hr. 



Second Semester 
S.W. 285-Development of Pub. 

Social Services 3 hr. 

Soc. 243-Intr. to Anthro 3 hr. 

Soc. 244— Culture & Personality ... 3 hr. 
Pol. Sc. 106-State & Local 

Government 3 hr. 

Hist. 150— W.Va. History 3 hr. 

Electives 2 hr. 



SENIOR YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

S.W. 220-Field of Soc. Wk 3 hr. S.W. 221 -Field of Social Work ... 3 hr. 

Soc. 274-Housing 3 hr. Ag. 271-Econ 2 hr. 

Electives — hr. Home Ec. 104— Home Mg. & 

Familv Living 3 hr. 

Electives — hr. 

Suggested Electives for Juniors and Seniors Majoring in Pre-Professiotjal Social 
Work. 

English 111, 127, 160, 161, 166, 171, 220, 222, 228, 235, 239; Economics 115, 
116, 119, 125, 217, 241, 242, 245; History 179, 180, 181, 213, 214, 234, 258, 259; Hu- 
manities 141, 142, 181, 182; Philosophy 4, 107, 108; Psychology 116, 125, 218, 222, 229, 
234; Political Science 107, 110. 122, 200, 203, 230, 231; Sociology 205, 206, 231, 233; 
Speech 11, 120, 250. 

Courses of Instruction 

For fuller description see Department of Social Work Announcements. 

General Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours in social sciences for Social Work 
courses in the 200 series; 24 semester hours in social sciences, for Social Work 
courses in the 300 series. Such prerequisite courses may be taken in the fol- 
lowing fields: economics, history, political science, general social science, sociology, and 
psychology. Social Work courses in the 200 series may be offered toward admis- 
sion requirements for courses in the 300 series. 



190 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Upper Division™ 

212. Social Agency Observation. S. 2 hr. PR: 12 hr. in social sciences. Field visits 
to selected welfare and health agencies combined with lecture-discussion per- 
iods. Designed primarily for teachers and other school personnel. Not to be 
taken by students who plan to offer S.W. 220-221 toward a degree. Mr. Loomis 

220. The FirrD of Social Work. I, S. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. in social sciences. A survey 
course. Areas covered in this part: present-day social security and public 
assistance; child welfare services; settlements and social group work; com — 
munity organization agencies. Mr. Whitney 

221. The Field of Social Work. II, S. 3 hr. PR: S.W. 220 or consent. A contin- 
uation of Social Work 220. Areas covered in this part: child guidance clinics 
and the mental health movement; social work in medical and psychiatric 
settings; school social work; juvenile courts; probation and parole. 

Mr. Whitney 

230. History of Social Work. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. in social sciences. Development 

of voluntary social work; designed to give students an understanding of 

present-day practices and trends. Mr. Loomis 

260. P noDLEMO op Child Welfare. II, S. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. in social sciences. Develop- 
ment of a philosophy of child care based on the common needs of children 
and on the special needs of certain groups of children. Services provided by 
child welfare agencies to children who need foster care, adoption service, 
institutional care, or service in own homes. Mr. Fulton 



Devei 



285. Development of Public Social Services. II, S. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. in social sci- 
ences. Public welfare from the seventeenth-century poor laws to the Social 
Security Act of 1935. Mr. Loomis 

Graduate Division 

301. Casework. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. An introduction to the philosophy, generic 
principles, and basic concepts of the social casework method. Mr. Whitney 

302. Casework. II, S. 3 hr. PR: S.W. 301 and S.W. 311-312, or consent. Continua- 
tion of S.W. 301 following a semester of field work. Miss Walcott 

303. Introduction to Social Group Work. II. 2 hr. PR: Consent. Beginning princi- 
ples and methods by which group workers help members to use group rela- 
tionships for individual growth. Mr. Serotkin 

304. Community Relationships. S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Community organization 
responsibilities of worker, supervisor, and administrator; of councils, chests, 
direct-service agencies, etc. Mr. Fulton 

311, 312. Field Work. II, S. 5 hr. each. PR: S.W. 301. Field practice in selected 
social agencies under general direction of the faculty. Miss Walcott and Staff 

315. Psychosocial Development of the Individual. I. 2 hr. PR: Consent. Normal 
development of the individual from infancy to old age, with attention to 
behavior problems of children. Emphasis is placed on the psychodynamics 
of growth and adjustment and the mechanisms used by individuals to achieve 
balance and maturity. Mr. Whitney, Mr. Tait and Staff 

320. Psychopathology. II. 2 hr. PR: S.W. 301, 315. Discussion of the various forms 
of psychopathology, with emphasis on the dynamics of behavior. Application 
to social casework with illustrations of treatment by psychiatrists and by 
caseworkers. Mr. Tait and Staff 

36The preprofessional curriculum also includes Agr. 271, Agricultural Eco- 
nomics, II, 2 hr.; Home Ec. 104, Nutrition and Home Management, II, 3 hr.; Soc. 
274, Housing, I, 3 hr.; and Soc. 243, Anthropology, II, 3 hr. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 191 



321. Social Casework III. S. 2 hr. PR: S.W. 302. An advanced course in generic 
social casework. Detailed analysis of case situations of increasing complexity 
involving deviate and normal behavior. Case materials drawn from medical, 
psychiatric, authoritative, child welfare and family service settings. 

Mr. Fulton and Miss Walcott 

322. Social Casework IV. II, 2 hr. PR: S.W. 331-332. An advanced course in 
generic social casework. Analysis of casework processes, with special emphasis 
on the helping relationship with clients whose problems are complicated by 
difficulties within themselves or their relationships. Miss Walcott 

331, 332. Advanced Field Work. I. 5 hr. each. PR: S.W. 302. Continuation of S.W. 
311-312, in a different setting, with opportunities for deepening understanding 
and skill. Miss Walcott and Staff 

351. Social Statistics. I. 2 hr. Basic principles of social welfare statistics needed by 
the practitioner. Mr. Loomis 

360. J Hjbu€ 4¥elfare Spruced. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. The student is assisted to 
understand and evaluate for himself the basic principles of modern social 
security, including public assistance, social insurance, care and protection of 
children, and services for veterans. Mr. Loomis 

361. Social Welfare Administration. I. 2 hr. PR: Admission to Department or 
consent. Administrative principles applicable to the organization and opera- 
tion of social agencies. Special attention to the practitioner's responsibilities. 

Mr. Fulton 

364. Research Methods. II. 2 hr. PR: Admission to Department or consent. The 

role of research in social work: sources of secondary data; planning, organizing 

and conducting a study. Mr. Fulton 

371. Medical Information. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Ill health as a social problem. 
The causes, incidence, symptoms, and treatment of common diseases. Social 
factors that promote or retard health. The social worker's responsibility for 
case-finding, treatment and prevention, and the use of community resources. 
Group work services in the care of the ill. 

Medical School Staff, Lecturers, and Mr. Rhudy 

380. Advanced Public Welfare. II. 2 hr. PR: S.W. 360. Current issues in modern 
public welfare and auxiliary services. Factual analvsis of programs. Trends 
in current thinking about the public welfare services. Mr. Loomis 

381. Problem Report. I, II, S. 1-3 hr. per semester or term. Total required: 3 hr. 
PR: Second year standing. Substantial exploration and discussion of a pro- 
fessionallv significant problem involving organization, evaluation, and inter- 
pretation of quantitative or qualitative data. Required of all candidates for 
M.S.W. Degree. Mr. Fulton and Staff 

390. Seminar. II, S. 2 hr. PR: 30 semester hours in graduate social work training. 
Selected problems in social work as a profession, including problems in wel- 
fare administration. Comparison of basic social work methods. Generic 
aspects of settings. Mr. Loomis and Staff 

391. Seminar in Applied Psychodvnamics. II. S. 1 hr. PR: S.W. 302 and 315. A 
seminar in which case materials are discussed, with special emphasis on identi- 
fying cause and effect relationships, and analyzing effectiveness of treatment. 

Miss Walcott 

392. Seminar in Community Organization. II, S. 1 or 2 hr. PR: S.W. 304 or 
equivalent. Current problems in planning, organizing and financing social 
services, with special reference to chests, councils, and state-wide organizations 
of health and welfare services. Mr. Fulton 



192 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Gibbard; Associate Professor Saposnekow; Assistant Professor Kerr; 
Instructor Detrick. 

The study of sociology should help the student to increase his understanding 
of the society in which he lives. The work of an undergraduate major in 
sociology provides basic preparation for teaching social sciences in high schools 
and for careers in social work and other fields involving interpersonal relations. 
The study of sociology should be an aid to citizenship and intelligent participation 
in modern life. 

A major in sociology consists of 18 or more hours of upper-division courses 
including as a rule Sociology 202, Introduction to Social Research, Sociology 243, 
Introduction to Anthropology, and Sociology 246, Types of Sociological Theory. 
A course in statistics is strongly recommended. Students may count toward a sociology 
major Rural Sociology 105, Rural Life, and Psychology 130, Statistical Methods in 
Psychology. 

Prerequisite for Sociology courses in the "200" series: Sociology 1 or 102, or 
Social Science 1, 2 (or equivalents) . 

Courses of Instruction 

Lower Division 

1. Introduction to Sociology. I, II. 3 hr. Basic concepts; fundamental in- 
stitutions and functions of society. Staff 

2. Contemporary Social Problems. I, II. 3 hr. Sociological analysis of current 
social problems. Mr. Detrick and Mr. Kerr 

Upper Division 

102. Principles of Sociolocy. I, II. 3 hr. Analysis of nature and operation 
of our society; formulation of sociological principles. (A first course mainly 
for upper-division students. Not for credit by students with credit for 
Sociol. 1). . / Mr. Saposnekow 

/Co. FfirtiLy uvi*C>\ --/-/• 

202. Introduction to Social Research. I. 3 hr. Trends in social research; ex- 
amination of methods and techniques. Mr. Detrick or Mr. Gibbard 

205. Urban Sociology. II. 3 hr. Growth of urbanism in the U.S.; population, 
ecological, status, and institutional aspects of organization of cities; urban 
problems. Mr. Gibbard 

206. Rural Sociology. I. 3 hr. Rural conditions, structures, processes, problems, 
_ trends, agencies. ^- *^>*. - Staff 

210. Marriage and the Family. I, II? 3 hr. Sociological analysis of the con- 
_^^i temporary family and its problems. Mr. Kerr 

211. Sociology of Childhood. II. 3 hi. Adjustment of child to American culture. 

Mr. Kerr 

229. Population and Migrations. I. 3 hr. Population theories; growth, composition, 

and distribution of American population; immigration and cultural pluralism: 

internal migrations and their consequences. Mr. Gibbard 

231. Race Relations. I. 3 hr. Race in the U.S. with emphasis on the American 
Negro. Mr. Gibbard 

233. Criminology. I, II. 3 hr. Explanation of crime and delinquency; critical study 
of criminal justice, penal methods, and reform movements. Mr. Saposnekow 

235. Collective Behavior. I. 3 hr. Analysis of new group formation and behavior 
following social dislocation; social unrest, crowd behavior, and other forms 
of social contagion; the public and public opinion; social movements. 

— — . Mr. Detrick 

X- - Jt 



I 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 193 



243. Introduction to Anthropology. II. 3 hr. Biological history of man; 
analytical study of social organization, culture, and intellectual life of primi- 
tive man. Mr. Saposnekow 

244. Culture and Personality. II. 3 hr. Significant interrelations between the in- 
dividual and his culture. Mr. Detrick 

246. Types of Sociological Theory II. 3 hr. Examination of leading schools 
of sociological thought in our day. Mr. Saposnekow 

274. Housing. I. 3 hr. Urban and rural housing conditions in U.S.; proposed 
solutions; role of public and private action. Mr. Saposnekow 

Graduate Division 

Prerequisite for all courses in the "300" series: consent of department head. 

371, 372. Thesis. I, II. 1-6 hr. Staff 

391. General Seminar, I, II. 3 hr. Staff 

392. General Seminar. I, II. 3 hr. Staff 

393. Seminar in Sociological Research. I, II. 3 hr. Staff 

394. Seminar in Sociological Research. I, II. 3 hr. Staff 

395. Seminar in Sociological Thfory. I, II. 3 hr. Staff 

396. Seminar in Sociological Theory. I, II. 3 hr. Staff 

SPEECH 

Professor Henning; Associate Professors Boyd, Fear, Jerome, and Welden; Assistant 
Professors Anderson, Burrows, and Cobin; Instructors Anapol, Copenhaver, and 
Greene. 

The curriculum of the Department of Speech is so organized that a student 
may receive basic training in the cultural and practical aspects of any one or 
more of six fields of speech: (1) interpretation; (2) public address; (3) radio; (4) 
speech correction and audiology; (5) teaching; and (6) theatre. In all courses of 
training in speech skills, professional standards of achievement are emphasized. 

Forensic Activities. Intramural and intercollegiate forensics, including debate, 
oratory, and extemporaneous speaking, receive due attention. Speech tournaments, 
trips, and tours as well as campus contests are included in the program. Participation 
in these activities may lead to membership in Delta Sigma Rho, honorary forensic 
fraternity. 

Theatrical Performances. The University Players, in conjunction with classes 
in dramatics, present a regular program of plays which affords ample opportunity 
for student participation. In addition, other public and semi-public performances 
are scheduled to provide experience for less advanced students. Membership in 
Alpha Psi Omega may be earned by superior work in connection with various 
productions. 

Radio Programs. The University Radio Theatre produces five-minute to half- 
hour shows for broadcasting. All regularly enrolled students in the University, as 
well as those majoring in radio work within the Speech Department, are eligible 
to audition for any of the programs or plays. 

Off -Campus Speech Services. The Department of Speech sponsors and fur- 
nishes student programs in the form of short plays, speeches, interpretative readings, 
and debates for off-campus performances before women's and civic clubs, com- 
munity organizations, and church groups throughout the state. 



194 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Major Requirements. The minimum number of hours in speech courses for 
a major is 36, including the following required courses: 3, 6, 11, 29, 50, 120, 121, 
and 140. The 12 hours of electives taken in addition to these required courses 
must all be upperdivision. A total of 40 semester hours in Speech may be counted 
toward graduation. Included in the major requirements is the passage of the platform 
test. 

Platform Test. During the second semester of the sophomore year each speech 
major shall demonstrate proficiency in a 15-minute platform test at a time and place 
designated by the head of the department. Passage of this test shall be prerequisite 
to continue registration as a speech major. Two tests shall be the maximum allowed 
any student. A student may petition to have any public platform appearance 
in which he may have occasion to appear judged as his platform test. Satisfactory 
passage will fulfill this requirement. 

Distribution of Courses 

The required courses for speech should be distributed as follows: 

Freshman year: first semester: Speech 3. 

second semester: Speech 29, 50. 
Sophomore year: first semester: Speech 6, 11. 

second semester: Speech 120, 140. 
Junior year: second semester: Speech 121. 

Teacher Training. Speech majors who plan to teach speech and all others 
who have chosen speech as a teaching field should select, in addition to the above, 
courses in their junior and senior years as follows: 

Junior year: first semester: Speech 161*, 162. 

second semester: Speech 160*. (and 121). 
Senior year: first semester: Speech 221*, 250. 

second semester: Speech 270.f 

Courses of Instruction 

Loxi'er Division 

1. Speech Clinic Laboratory. I, II. 1 or 2 hr. PR: Speech examination in 
speech clinic and consent. Laboratory course for students with speech 
defects. Mr. Jerome and Staff 

2. Speech Clinic Laboratory. I, II. 1 or 2 hr. PR: Speech 1 and consent. 
Laboratory course for students with speech defects. Mr. Jerome and Staff 

3. Voice and Diction. I, II. 3 hr. Drills for developing proper breath support 
and for producing a strong, flexible, resonant voice. Coordination of mind 
and voice. Phonetics. Voices recorded and analyzed, with corrective exercises 
prescribed. Open to all students. Staff 

6. Acting. I, II. 3 hr. Drills for developing muscular control; for overcoming 
inhibitions; for rendering the body expressive of thought and emotion. Co- 
ordination of mind and body. Open to all students. Mr. Boyd and Mr. Cobin 

11. Public Speaking. I, II. 3 hr. PR: English 1 and 2. Study and application of 
principles of practical public speaking. Training in composition and effective 
delivery of speeches of developing skill in thinking and speaking before an 
audience. Mr. Welden and Staff 

13. Public Speaking. I, II. 2 hr. PR: English 1 and 2. For engineering students 
only. Mr. Anapol 



*Advised, but not required, courses. 
fOffered in alternate years only. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 195 



ir//j/s 



29. Oral Interpretation. I, II. 3 hr. Development of mental and emotional 
responsiveness to printed page. Study of recordings of well-known speakers 
and readers. Practice in reading all types of literature. Open to all students. 

2^ Mrs. Fear 

^0. Theatrical Methods and Practices. I, II. -0 hr. Two hours of lecture and two 

hours of laboratory each week. Basic techniques and terminologies of acting, 

scene construction, lighting, properties and costuming, directing, and theatre 

history. Laboratory participation in actual production of University Theatre 

/ 'l _and Children's Theatre plays. Required of all speech majors. 

/, //A /' T/ / :;'. * /_ ft\ /fy Mr. Cobin and Mr. Burrows 

60. Junior Varsity Debate. I. 1-2 hr. Intercollegiate debate" training and par- 
ticipation preparatory to varsity team debating. Open to freshmen and 
sophomores. Mr. Anapol 






61. Junior Varsity Derate. II. 1-2 hr. Continuation of Speech 60. Mr. Anapol 



75. Parliamentary Procedure. I, II. 1 hr. Study of and practice in establishing 

rules of order and methods of conducting meetings, assemblies, societies, etc. 

. , Mr. Welden 

~98v- 99. Verse Choir. I, II. 1 hr. Practice in oral interpretation of literature 

through group speaking. Mrs. Fear 

INTERPRETATION 

Upper Division 

430^-4#*-, -wfc m Advanc ed Vrnnr Cnnip T, TT 1 hr . PRi S pooch 08 or 00 or 

consent. Training in choric speec h tor public performance. Mrs. Fear 

104. Advanced Oral Interpretation. I. 3 hr. PR: Speech 29. Content and form 

of various types of literature and advanced techniques for their oral presen- 
tation. Mrs. Fear 

105. Basic Problems in Interpretation. II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 29 and consent. 
Designed to deal with individual problems of students in interpretation. 

Mrs. Fear 
113. Advanced Voice and Diction. II. 2 hr. PR: Speech 3 or equivalent. De- 
signed to develop and reinforce correct habits of speech. Adapted to in- 
dividual needs. s Mrs. Fear 

200. Art of Storytelling. II. -S- hr. PR: Consent. Principles involved in effective 
presentation of stories, with practical experience in classroom and before 
audiences. Stories of all types for adults and children studied. Mrs. Fear 



m 



.viioN. I. 2 hi. PR: Speech 104 and consent. Forms of 
poetry,- and then interpretation. Mrs. Fear 

2#2: — Interpretation of Dramatic Literature. I. 3 hr. PR: Speech 104 and con- 
sent. Content and form of dramatic literature and attendant techniques for 
oral presentation. Mrs. Fear 

203. Professional Reading. I. 3 hr. PR: 6 hours of interpretation and consent. 
Intensive training in interpretation. Designed to meet needs of individual. 
Full-length public recital prepared and presented. Limited enrollment. 

Mrs. Fear 

204. Interpretation of Prose. II. 2 hr. PR: Speech 104 and consent. Content 
and form of non-dramatic prose and attendant techniques for oral present- 
ation. Mrs. Fear 

205. Theories in Interpretation. II. ^ hr. PR: 6 hours of interpretation and 
consent. Systems and theories of interpretation in terms of historical develop- 
ment and current practices. Mrs. Fear 



196 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Upper Division 

120. Group Discussion. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 11. Theory and practice of various 
forms of group discussion. Principles, methods, and types of group discussions; 
application of contemporary problems. Required of all speech majors. 

Mr. Welden 

121. Argumentation and Debate. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Speceh 11. Principles of argument, 
evidence, and reasoning; application to debating. Required of all speech majors. 

Mr. Welden 

123. Advanced Argumentation and Debate. I. 3 hr. PR: Speech 121. Primarily tor 
varsity debaters and Law students. Mr. Welden 

124. Advanced Argumentation and Debate. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Speech 123. 

Mr. Welden 

125. Advanced Public Speaking. I. 3 hr. PR: Speech 11. Techniques in composi- 
tion and delivery of public speeches. Attention to parliamentary procedure. 

2^ Mr. Anapol 

220. Speech Composition. II. & hr. PR: Speech 11 and consent. Materials of 
speech, organization, and style; application to delivery. Mr. Henning 

221. Persuasion. I. 3 hr. PR: Speech 121 or equivalent and consent. Welding of 
an audience, securing and holding attention, use of suggestion, influencing 
belief, psychology of motivation, and dramatization of ideas. Mr. Henning 

222. Forms of Public Address. II. A hr. PR: Consent. Composition and delivery of 
oration, political speech, speech of introduction, dedicatory address, and 
eulogistic speech. Mr. Welden 

223. Advanced Group Discussion. $ hr. (Extension only). Application of the prin- 
ciples and practices of group discussion to classroom teaching, the conference 
table, committee work, policy-determining groups, and the public forum. 
Opportunities for participation by members of the class using current national 
and international problems. Mr. Greene and Mr. Welden 

225. Interscholastic Forensics. Summei Session only. 4 hr. PR: Consent. Inter- 
scholastic public-speaking activities with emphasis upon types commonly 
termed original speech, such as debate, oratory, and extemporaneous speak- 
ing. Opportunity for performance in each type will be provided. 
, Mr. Henning and Mr. Welden 

-355. History of American Public Address. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Critical study 
of leading American speakers, their biographies, speeches, and issues with 
which thev dealt. Mr. Welden 



Seminar: Problems t»v Public Speaking. I, II. 3 hr. PR. Consent. Mr. Henning 

Graduate Division 

330. Classical Rhetoric. I. 3 hr. Critical study of early writings in field of 
speech, their philosophies of composition, organization, style, and delivery 
of public speeches, debates, and discussion. Open to advanced senior 
speech majors and graduate students, with consent. Mr. Henning 

331. Medieval and Modern Rhetoric. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Speech 330. 

Mr. Henning 

RADIO 

Upper Division 

140. Introduction to Radio. I, II. 3 hr. Radio as an industry. Organization of 
stations— local, regional, and network. FCC regulations. History of broad- 
casting, its responsibilities, and job opportunities. Required of all speech 
majors. Miss Anderson and Mr. Greene 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AMI SCIENCES 197 






240. 



141. Radio Announcing. II. ?■ lir. Procedures and routines of announcing. Staff 
assignments, regulations, logged broadcasting operations, reports, and emergency 
procedures. Preparation of news and commercial copy. Miss Anderson 

142. Radio Acting. I, II. 3 hr. Microphone techniques, analysis of character, mood 
scene, and situation. Problems of pacing, timing, climax, and projection of 
character. Participation in Radio Players broadcasts. Miss Anderson 

143. Fundamentals of Radio Production. I. A hr. PR: Speech 140 or consent. 
The operation and care of studio and control-room equipment. Nontechnical 
study of control and transmission of all types of radio programs. Blending 
of sound, music, and speech in dramatic production. 

Miss Anderson and Mr. Greene 

144. Continuity Writing. I. 2 hr. Format of all types of radio writing except 
dramatic scripts. Continuity for music programs, talks, interviews, round-table 
discussions, forums and variety shows. Miss Anderson 

Dramatic Radio Writing. I. \£ hr. PR: Speech 141 or consent. Dramatic 
scripts, documentaries, poetry programs, serial dramas, and children's shows. 
Scripts are written to be aimed at definite markets or for production by 
Universitv Radio Players. Miss Anderson 

2- 

// y/xjIW. Advanced Radio Acting. II. ^hr. PR: 142 or consent. Specialized study in 

character and dramatic types, regional and foreign dialects, development of 

original characterizations for professional audition material. Participation in 

University Radio Players. Miss Anderson 

2— 

;, 242. Production Directing. II. % hr. PR: Speech 143, or consent. Lecture and 
laboratory in analysis, casting, rehearsal, and production of talk shows, inter- 
views, round-table forums, popular and classical music shows, variety shows, 
and dramas. Miss Anderson 

243. Introduction to Television. I. 2 hr. PR: Consent. Television industry, its 
history and development. Problems in production of television shows. Fun- 
damentals of picture transmission. Comparison with radio broadcasting. 

Miss Anderson 

244. Program Planning. II. 2 hr. PR: Speech 140 or consent. Methods of analysis 
of audience interests and subsequent planning of programs to service advertisers' 
accounts. Planning of public service, sustaining, and educational programs. 

Miss Anderson 
"248". Seminar: Problems of Radio Production. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 142 and 
242 or consent. Miss Anderson 

^49. Seminar: Problems of Station Management and Operation. I, II. 3 hr. 
PR: 9 hours of radio and consent. Miss Anderson 

SPEECH RE-EDUCATION 

Upper Division 

150. Phonetics. I. 2 hr. Production, perception, transcription, and variations ot 
the speech sounds of the English language. Miss Copenhaver 

250. Speech Correction. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. General survey of the field of 

speech correction, adapted for the classroom teacher with emphasis on the 

recognition and therapy of articulation disorders. Mr. Jerome 

/ 2 5 is 

~3$i. Speech Anatomy. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Anatomical and physiological study 
of the vocal mechanism. Mr. Jerome 

- 
252. Speech Pathology. I. 2 hr. PR: Speech 250 and consent. Theories ana 
therapies of stuttering. Miss Copenhaver 



i/- 









198 CURRICULA AND COURSES 






253. Audiometry. I. ^ hr. PR: Consent. Study of the anatomv of the ear, psycho 
physics of sound, testing of hearing, and function of hearing aids. Mr. Jerome 

J8ft£. Advanced Speech Pathology. II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 250 and consent. 
(Theories of causation and therapies for delayed speech development, cleft 
palate speech, and cerebral palsy speech.) Mr. Jerome 

255. Hard of Hearing Therapy. II. |C hr. PR: Speech 150 and consent. Theories 
and methods of teaching lip reading and speech to the hearing handicapped. 

Miss Copenhaver 

257. Clinical Practice. I, II. 2-3 hr. PR: Speech 252 or Speech 254 and consent. 
Supervised therapy of the less severe speech and/or hearing problems. 

Miss Copenhaver 

258. Advanced Clinical Practice. I, II. 2-3 hr. PR: Speech 257 and consent. 
Supervised therapy of severe speech and/or hearing problems. Mr. Jerome 

'33 7 

256. Seminar: Speech Pathology. I, II. 2 hr. PR: 9 hours of speech re-education 
courses and consent. Mr. Jerome 

THEATRE 

Upper Division 

160. Theatrical Make-up. I. 2 hr. Lecture-laboratory course in art of stage 
make-up. Practical experience provided by doing make-up for University 
Plavers productions. Mr. Burrows 



a 



161. Stage S cenery . . I. 3 hr. Lecture-laboratory course in problems of planning 
and building stage scenery. Practical experience provided in the workshop on 
University productions. Mr. Burrows 

162. Play Directing. I. 3 hr. PR: Speech 50. Fundamentals of directing stage 
play. Emphasis on work of director in relation to actor, stage, business, com- 
position, movement, and rehearsal schedule. Mr. Boyd 

163. Stage Lighting. II. 3 hr. Problems and theories of stage lightingr-i*4l«4ing 
lectures,, demonst rations, laboratory spssi nn'i " a nd prnrtirnl nr prr-Hi^f "n Uni 
versity productions. Mr. Burrows 

164. Theatre Workshop. I, II. 1-3 hr. Laboratory for production of University 
plays and informal stimulation of interest in creative arts. Open to all 
students. Mr. Burrows 

260. Advanced Acting. II. )§ hr- PR: Speech 6, Speech 50, and consent. Char- 
acterization, script analysis, style, theories, and techniques. Designed to 
meet needs of individual student. Mr Boyd 

261. Theatrical Dialects. I. 2 hr. PR: Consent. Study and mastery of 12 common 
dialects used in theatre and radio. Mr. Boyd 

262. Playwriting. II. % hr. PR: Speech 50 and consent. Development of creative 
ability in dramatic composition. Study of techniques and problems of play- 
wright. Of cultural value, but primarily a writing course. Mr. Cobin 

2a*> 

263. Scene Design. II. JS hr. PR: Consent. Lecture and laboratory in theories 
of scene design for stage, including practical participation in planning scenery 
for University productions. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students. 

2-* Mr. Burrows 

264. Advanced Play Directing. II. $ hr. PR: Speech 162, either Speech 161 or 
164, and consent. Emphasis on work of director as an integrating artist. Dis- 
play of high level of proficiency in direction of an one-act play required of 
all students enrolled. Mr. Boyd 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 199 



: 



265. History of Theatre. I. & hr. PR: Speech 50 and consent. Historical survey 
of theatre from primitive times to present. Includes both oriental and 
occidental theatres. Mr. Cobin 

256. Theatre in Society. II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 50 and consent. Objectives of 

theatre art, its position in our social structure, philosophy, objectives, and 

. ethical responsibilities of theatre artist. Mr. Cobin 

{A-QG&. Semina r: Problems in A gjjw, amp Directing . I, II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. 

f ' ' Mr. Cobin 

-269. Srm+nar: Problems in Technical Theatre. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. 

I j \ Mr. Burrows 

f * / 

RELATED COURSES 

170, 171, 172. Extra-Curricular Speech Activities. I, II. 1-3 hr. PR: Consent 
of head. Head of department may grant credit for any extracurricular 
speech activity which is assigned to and directed by member of speech staff. 

Staff 

270. Psychology of Speech. II. 3 hr. PR: 6 hours of psychology and 18 hours of 
speech. Psychological principles involved in speech situation. Analysis or 
roles of emotion, habit, learning, judgment, rating, and imagery in speech. 

Mr. Henning 

275. Speech Problems of Children. Summer Session only. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Nor- 
mal development of speech habits in children. Diagnostic and remedial pro- 
cedures for speech defective. Relationship between speech and allied activities 
such as reading, spelling, and disciplinary problems. Mr. Henning 

Graduate Division 

301. Research Problems and Methods. I. 3 hr. PR: Graduate standing. Required 
of all candidates for Master's Degree in speech. Mr. Henning 

370. Research. I, II. 1-3 hr. PR: Speech 301, a speech seminar, and consent of 
head of department. For graduate students in speech. Mr. Henning and Staff 

375. Independent Study. I, II. 1-3 hr. PR: Speech 301, a speech seminar, and con- 
sent of head of department. Open to graduate students in speech who are 
pursuing independent problems in that field. Mr. Henning and Staff 

399. Thesis. I, II. 2-4 hr. Mr. Henning and Staff 



The College of Commerce 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Commerce of West Virginia University was established by the 
Board of Governors of the University on November 10, 1951, and began its initial 
year of operation in September, 1952. Courses leading to the bachelor's and master's 
degrees in business administration and economics have been offered by West Virginia 
University for many years in the Department of Economics and Business Administra- 
tion which has been in the College of Arts and Sciences. After September, 1952, the 
Department of Economics and Business Administration became the College of 
Commerce. 

Objectives 

The primary objective of the College of Commerce is to provide students with 
training for careers in business and for careers that require extensive training in 
economics. To achieve this aim, the curricula of the College are so constructed as 
to provide a broad cultural background; a core group of courses in the various 
phases of business administration and economics; and specialization in a particular 
field of business administration or economics. 

Undergraduate Program 

Undergraduate work is undertaken in two divisions; the lower division, in which 
Freshmen and Sophomores are enrolled, and the upper division, in which Juniors 
and Seniors are enrolled. The lower division curriculum is designed to afford students 
a liberal educational background and to provide a foundation for the work that 
follows. Students will be admitted to the College of Commerce upon completion of 
58 semester hours of required and acceptable elective courses in the lower division 
curriculum at a grade average of not less than "C." 

In order to provide a well-rounded background in the different phases of business 
or economics, a core curriculum is required. These courses are: Economic Principles, 
Industrial Management, Business Law, Money and Banking, Accounting, Statistics, 
Labor Problems, Business Finance, and Marketing. (Certain exceptions are made in 
the Economics major option.) Since many students do not follow the careers for 
which they prepare in the University, this background of fundamentals should better 
enable them, in terms of versatility and adaptability, to meet the changing courses of 
their careers than does a highly specialized program. Furthermore, it affords a 
comprehensive educational foundation upon which specialized programs can be built. 

Although narrowly specialized training is avoided, major concentration areas 
are offered. These permit upperclassmen to acquire a detailed knowledge of those 
phases that interest them particularly. The major fields of study are as follows: 
Accounting, Economics, Finance, Management, Marketing, Secretarial Training, and 
General Business. 

Graduate Program 

The graduate curriculum (for the Master's Degree) is designed to give qualified 
students the opportunity to pursue an advanced course of study in one or more 
specialized fields of business administration or economics. Each student's program 
is prepared in terms of his academic background and his interests, and is subject to 
the approval of his adviser. 

Bureau of Business Research 

The Bureau of Business Research, functioning as an integral part of the College, 
was organized for the purpose of undertaking research into business and economic 

200 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 201 



problems— particularly those of West Virginia. This research program is undertaken 
by faculty members of the College of Commerce and by other staff members, under 
the general supervision of the Director of the Bureau of Business Research. 

Publication of a series of monographs, the West Virginia Business and Economic 
Studies, was begun by the Bureau in 1949. 

Building and Equipment 

The physical facilities of the College of Commerce are modern and adequate. 
Armstrong Hall, which houses the College, was erected in 1950. It contains excellent 
classrooms and offices, well-equipped accounting and statistics laboratories, and the 
Bureau of Business Research. 

Placement of Graduates 

The faculty placement adviser in the College as well as all staff members will aid 
qualified graduates to find desirable employment. Graduates have access to the 
University Placement Office, which serves graduating seniors and alumni. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Regular Students 

Applicants seeking admission to the College of Commerce for the purpose of 
obtaining a degree must have earned at least 58 semester hours of required and 
approved elective courses in the lower-division curriculum at a grade average of not 
less than "C." 

REGISTRATION 

Pre-Commerce freshmen and sophomores as well as juniors and seniors of the 
College of Commerce enroll at the beginning of each semester or term of the University. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



Bachelor's Degree 

The College of Commerce offers the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration and Bachelor of Science in Economics. Candidates for these degrees 
must have a minimum of 128 semester hours of work and have satisfied the College 
requirements as to courses and grades (256 grade points) in order to graduate. 

A Second Bachelor's Degree 

A student who has earned a Bachelor's Degree in one department or college of 
West Virginia University may become eligible for a second Bachelor's Degree by 
earning a minimum of 30 semester hours which include the core curriculum courses 
of the College of Commerce. 

Master's Degree 

Candidates for the degrees of master of science in Business Administration and 
master of arts in Economics must have a minimum of 30 semester hours (approved 
by advisers) taken as graduate students. A thesis is required of all candidates. For 
details about requirements for graduate degrees reference should be made to the 
Announcements of the Graduate School. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 
Lower Division 

Pre-Commerce students are expected to complete the lower-division program of 
study within the first two years of residence at the University. 



202 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



FIRST YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Eng. 1 and 2 6 

Hisi 1 and 2 or Humanities 1 and 2 6 or 8 

Laboratory Science* 8 

Math. 2, 3, or 8 3 

Mil. or Air Sci. 1 and 2 4 

F.E. (Service Program) 2 

Electives (Men)2 6 

Electives (Women) 2 8 

Total 35 or 37 



SECOND YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Accounting 1 and 2 6 

Eng. 23 - 3 

Econ. 1 and 2 6 

Speech 11 3 

Hist. 52 or Pol. Sci. 5 3 

Mil. or Air Sci. 3 and 4 4 

P.E. (Service Program) Women 2 

Electives (Men) 2 8 

Electives (Women) 2 10 

Total 33 



Accounting 

The accounting program is designed to prepare students for public accounting, 
and for positions as accountants in business, industry, and government. 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Intermediate Accounting 

(Accounting 111) 3 

Advanced Accounting (Accounting 112) 3 
Cost Accounting (Accounting 115) .... 3 
Industrial Management (Man. Ill) ..3 

Statistics (Economics 125) 3 

Business Law (Bus. Law 111 and 112) .6 

Electives (Group 1) 4 6 

Electives (Group 2) 5 3 

Total 30 



SENIOR YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Advanced Accounting Problems I 

(Accounting 113) 3 

Business Finance (Finance 111) 3 

Money and Banking (Economics 111) .. 3 
Labor Problems (Economics 115) .... 3 
Principles of Marketing (Marketing 111) 3 

Electives (Group 1) 4 6 

Electives (Group 2) 5 6 

Electives (Group 1 and 2) 3 

Total 30 



iA laboratory science may be chosen from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, 
Botany, Zoology, Psychology, Geology, or Physical Science. 

2 Elective courses chosen from the following departments are recommended: 
English, History, Humanities, Mathematics, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychol- 
ogy, Sociology, Speech, or Foreign Language. Students who select a foreign lan- 
guage must complete 6 hours in the same language at the University. Students 
who plan to major in secretarial studies should schedule Secretarial Studies 
61 and 62 in the sophomore year. 

BStudents majoring in secretarial studies should schedule Secretarial Studies 
51 instead of English 23. 

^Electives in Group I are to be selected from course offerings in the College 
of Commerce with the approval of the adviser. Depending upon their particular 
areas of interest in accounting, students may select additional accounting courses 
from the following: Accounting 213, Income Tax Accounting I; Accounting 214, 
Income Tax Accounting II; Accounting 216, Advanced Cost Accounting; Accounting 
217, Auditing Theory; Accounting 218, Auditing Practice; Accounting 220, Ac- 
counting Systems; Accounting 221, Accounting for Selected Industries; Accounting 
224, Advanced Accounting Problems II; Accounting 230, Accounting Theory. 

5Electives in Group 2 are to be selected with the approval of the adviser 
from any department in the University other than in the College of Commerce. 
Students electing advanced Military or Air Science will use electives in groups 
1 and 2 in the junior year and electives from group 2 in the senior year. 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



203 



Economics 

This program is designed for those who wish to emphasize economics in their 
training for business; for those who wish to undertake graduate work for an advanced 
degree; for those who wish to enter government service; and for those who wish to teach. 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Statistics (Economics 125) 3 

Money and Banking (Economics 111) .3 

Labor Problems (Economics 115) 3 

Business Finance (Finance 111) 3 

Economic Theory (Economics 221) . . 3 

Electives (Group 1) (! 6 

Electives (Group 2) 7 6 

Electives (Group 1 or 2) 3 



SENIOR YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Public Finance (Economics 241) 3 

Business Cycles (Economics 235) 3 

History of Economic Thought 

(Economics 222) 3 

Electives (Group 1) 6 12 

Electives (Group 2) 7 6 

Electives (Group 1 or 2) 3 



Total 30 Total 



30 



Finance 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who plan to enter 
government service or to become associated with the financial or insurance departments 
of banks or of commercial and industrial organizations. 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Industrial Management 

(Management 111) 3 

Statistics (Economics 125) 3 

Business Law (Bus. Law 111 and 112) . 6 

Business Finance (Finance 111) 3 

General Insurance (Finance 115) .... 3 
Money and Banking (Economics 111) . 3 

Electives (Group l) 8 6 

Electives (Group 2) 9 3 

Total 30 



SENIOR YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Problems in Business Finance 

(Finance 212) 3 

Business Cycles (Economics 235) 3 

Investments (Finance 150) 3 

Labor Problems (Economics 115) 3 

Principles of Marketing (Marketing 111)3 

Electives (Group l) 8 6 

Electives (Group 2) 9 6 

Electives (Group 1 or 2) 3 

Total 30 



6Electives in Group 1 are to be selected from course offerings in the College 
or* Commerce with the approval of the adviser. 

7Electives in Group 2 are to be selected with the approval of the adviser 
from any department in the University other than in the College of Commerce. 
Students electing advanced Military or Air Science will use electives in groups 
1 and 2 in the junior year and electives from group 2 in the senior year. 

sElectives in Group 1 are to be selected from course offerings in the College 
of Commerce with the approval of the adviser. 

9Electives in Group 2 are to be selected with the approval of the adviser 
from any department in the University other than in the College of Commerce. 
Students electing advanced Military or Air Science will use electives in groups 
1 and 2 in the junior year and electives from group 2 in the senior year. 



204 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Management 

This program is designed to prepare students for the several types of positions in 
management, especially those in production and in industrial relations. Although 
it does not provide highly technical training for the several types of positions in the 
field of management, it does provide a foundation upon which specialized training 
can be developed. 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Statistics (Economics 125) 3 

Money and Banking (Economics 111) . 3 
Business Law (Bus. Law 111 and 112) . 6 

Labor Problems (Economics 115) 3 

Principles of Marketing (Marketing 111) 3 
Industrial Management 

(Management 111) 3 

Electives (Group l) 10 6 

Electives (Group 2) 11 3 

Total 30 



SENIOR YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Business Finance (Finance 111) 3 

Personnel Management 

(Management 216) 3 

Production Management 

(Management 112) 3 

Business Policy (Management 225) ... 3 
Marketing Management 

(Marketing 112) 3 

Electives (Group l) 10 6 

Electives (Group 2) 11 6 

Electives (Group 1 or 2) 3 

Total 30 



Marketing 

This program is designed to prepare students for positions in the field of distribu- 
tion. The required and suggested courses include work in the areas of sales manage- 
ment, sales promotion and advertising, marketing research and procurement as carried 
on by manufacturing, wholesaling, and retailing establishments. 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Business Finance (Finance 111) 3 

Statistics (Economics 125) 3 

Business Law (Bus. Law 111 and 112) . 6 
Industrial Management 

(Management 111) 3 

Principles of Marketing (Marketing 111) 3 
Marketing Management (Marketing 112) 3 

Electives (Group l) 12 6 

Electives (Group 2) 1 " 3 



SENIOR YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Labor Problems (Economics 1 15) .... 3 
Principles of Advertising 

(Marketing 120) 3 

Principles of Retailing (Marketing 115) 3 

Transportation (Economics 225) 3 

Money and Banking (Economics 111) . 3 

Electives (Group l) 12 6 

Electives (Group 2) 18 6 

Electives (Group 1 or 2) 3 



Total 30 Total 



30 



loElectives in Group 1 are to be selected from course offerings in the College 
of Commerce with the approval of the adviser. 

nEUectives in Group 2 are to be selected with the approval of the adviser 
from any department in the University other than in the College of Commerce. 
Students electing advanced Military or Air Science will use electives in groups 
1 and 2 in the junior year and electives from group 2 in the senior year. 

i2E!lectives in Group 1 are to selected from course offerings in the College 
of Commerce with the approval of the adviser. 

i3Electives in Group 2 are to be selected with the approval of the adviser 
from any department in the University other than in the College of Commerce. 
Journalism 113, Principles of Advertising in the School of Journalism and 
Psychology 132, Psychology of Advertising and Selling in the College of Arts and 
Sciences are especially recommended for students interested in the field of 
advertising. Students electing advanced Military or Air Science will use electives 
in groups 1 and 2 in the junior year and electives from group 2 in the senior year. 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



20' 



Secretarial Studies 

This program is designed for students who intend 
executives or supervisors of clerical activities in an office. 



to become secretaries to 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Industrial Management 

(Management 111) 3 

Business Law (Bus. Law 111 and 112) . 6 
Principles of Marketing (Marketing 111) 3 
Secretarial Training and Office 

Practice ((Secretarial Studies 131) . 3 
Shorthand 1 and 2 (Secretarial 

Studies 125 and 126) 8 

Electives (Group l)i* 3 

Electives (Group 2) 15 4 



SENIOR YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Statistics (Economics 125) 3 

Labor Problems (Economics 115) 3 

Business Finance (Finance 111) 3 

Transcription (Secretarial Studies 132) 2 

Money and Banking (Economics 111) . 3 

Electives (Group l)* 4 9 

Electives (Group 2) 15 4 

Electives (Group 1 or 2) 3 



Total 30 Total 



30 



General Business 

A student selecting the General Business Program has a wider choice of electives 
than does one who selects a more specialized program. This curriculum is recom- 
mended to those who have not decided upon a specialized field of study but who 
desire a well-integrated program in Business Administration. 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Courses Hr. 

Statistics (Economics 125) 3 

Principles of Marketing (Marketing 111) 3 
Business Law (Bus. Law 111 and 112) . 6 
Industrial Management 

(Management 111) 3 

Labor Problems (Economics 115) 3 

Electives (Group l)* 6 6 

Electives (Group 2) 17 6 



SENIOR YEAR 

Courses 

Personnel Management 

(Management 216) 3 

General Insurance (Finance 115) 3 

Money and Banking (Economics 111) . 3 

Business Finance (Finance 111) 3 

Electives (Group I) 16 9 

Electives (Group 2) 17 6 

Electives (Group 1 or 2) 3 



Hr. 



Total 30 Total 



,30 



i4Electives in Group 1 are to be selected from course offerings in the College 
of Commerce with the approval of the adviser. 

i5Electives in Group 2 are to be selected with the approval of the adviser 
from any department in the University other than in the College of Commerce. 
vStudents electing advanced Military or Air Science will use electives in groups 
1 and 2 in the junior year and electives from group 2 in the senior year. 

i6Electives in Group 1 are to be selected from course offerings in the College 
of Commerce with the approval of the adviser. 

i7Electives in Group 2 are to be selected with the approval of the adviser 
from any department in the University other than in the College of Commerce. 
Students electing advanced Military or Air Science will use electives in groups 
1 and 2 in the junior year and electives from group 2 in the senior year. 



206 ( IRRICII A AND (CURSES 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



ACCOUNTING 

1. Principles of Accounting. I, II. 3 hr. A study of the accounting cycle, journals 
and ledgers, working papers, and the preparation of financial and operating 
statements for individual proprietorships. Staff 

2. Principles of Accounting. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 1. Accounting concepts 
applicable to partnerships and corporations, including manufacturing concerns; 
analysis of financial statements and budgets. Staff 

5. Accounting for Engineers. I, II. 2 hr. Enrollment limited to engineering students. 

Staff 

111. Intermediate Accounting. I. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 2. Analysis of account- 
ing theory and practice as applied to partnerships and corporations. Mr. Beres 

112. Advanced Accounting. II. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 111. Accounting theories 
applicable to valuation of assets and determination of liabilities. Mr. Lambert 

113. Advanced Accounting Problems I. I. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 112. Accounting 
for consolidations, installment sales, consignments, receiverships, reorganizations, 
branches, foreign exchange, and estates and trusts. Mr. Backer 

115. Cost Accounting. I. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 2. Characteristics of material, 
labor, and burden costs in factory production; job order and process cost 
accounting. Mr. Lambert 

213, 214. Income Tax Accounting. I, II. 3 hr. per semester. PR: Accounting 112. 
Bureau of Internal Revenue Regulations and related legal cases; preparation 
of tax returns for individuals, partnerships, and corporations. Mr. Backer 

216. Advanced Cost Accounting. II. 2 hr. PR: Accounting 115. Accounting for stand- 
ard costs and budgetary control. Mr. Backer 

217. Auditing Theory. I. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 112. Procedure required for inde- 
pendent verification of financial statements; the duties and responsibilities of 
the auditor; the various types of examinations. Mr. Lambert 

218. Auditing Practice. II. 2 hr. PR: Accounting 217. Application of the procedures 
introduced in the previous semester, such as the preparation of audit work 
papers and reports, analysis of published statements, case studies, discussion of 
the Statement of Audit Procedure of the American Institute of Accountants. 

Mr. Lambert 

220. Accounting Systems. I. 2 hr. PR: Accounting 112. Installation of accounting 
systems, particularly as applied to procedure survey, design of accounting forms, 
use of hand written records, application of business machines, procedure re- 
ports. Mr. Lambert 

221. Accounting for Specific Industries. I. 2 hr. PR: Accounting 112. Accounting 
principles and financial reports peculiar to governmental agencies, banks, in- 
surance companies, department stores, public utilities, brokerage houses, etc. 

Mr. Lambert 
224. Advanced Accounting Problems. II. 3 hr. PR: Minimum of 18 hours in ac- 
counting with an average grade of "B" or higher. Analysis and solution of 
representative CP.A. problems. Mr. Backer 

230. Accounting Theory. II. 2 hr. PR: Accounting 112 and consent of instructor. 
Origin and development of accounting principles and standards. Mr. Backer 

331, 332. Thesis. I, II, 2 or 3 hr. Staff 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 207 



/ 



BUSINESS LAW 

111. Business Law. I, II. 3 hr. Introduction to the study of the legal system, courts 
and procedures; fundamentals of contracts and insurance. Mr. Farmer 

112. Business Law. I, II. 3 hr. Fundamentals of the law of real and personal prop- 
erty; sales of personal property; liens and security transactions; negotiable 
instruments. Mr. Farmer 

ECONOMICS 

1. Principles of Economics. I, II. 3 hr. Organization and principles of economic 
activity. Staff 

2. Principles of Economics. I, II. 3 hr. Economics 1 and 2 are prerequisite to all 
upper-division courses. Staff 

5. Fundamentals of Economics. I, II. 3 hr. For Engineers only. Staff 

111. Money and Banking. I. II. 3 hr. Our system of monetary and banking arrange- 
ments, viewed in relation to functioning of the economic system as a whole. 

Mr. Fishman 

115. Labor Problems. I. II. 3 hr. History of modern labor movements; analysis of 
economic and social problems arising from relations between capital, labor, and 
the state. Mr. Somers 

116. History of Labor in United States. II. 3 hr. PR: Economics 115 or consent of 
instructor. Origins and development of labor organizations with particular 
attention to those in the U. S. Mr. Somers 

119. Economics of Consumption. I. 3 hr. Economic and social problems involved in 
consumer choices. Staff 

125. Statistics. I. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 2, 3, or 8. Methods of collecting, presenting, 
analyzing, and interpreting business data, with special emphasis on the analysis 
of frequency distribution, trend fitting, seasonal corrections forecasting, and 
index numbers. A two-hour laboratory session is required in this course. 

Mr. Hanczaryk 

: — Pr oblems in SiAiisncs. II. 3 -hrr-PR:T Ec on o mics lg5. Th e analy^s-Tjf-progressi ve 

changes in season a L_pattern.^ — index ■ fflmbers;- -simple, multiple, ■- and -partial 

xmrelatiorrr -graphic multiple correlation sampling theory; statistical research. 

£Ui\t. l NT f'/ ' &L- E-hS\ S Mr. Hanczaryk 

209. Problems in Economics. I, II. 1-3 hr. A * / • Staff 



3 



210. Comparative Economic Systems. II. 3 hr. Structure and processes of existing 
economic systems throughout world including review of basic principles of free 
enterprise, socialistic, communistic, and fascistic societies. Comprehensive anal- 
ysis based on current and recent experiments in these economies. Staff 

217. Trade Unionism. I. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 115. An analysis of the structure, govern- 
ment, attitudes, and policies of organized labor: the economic and political 
implications of union policy. Mr. Somers 

218. Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations. II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 115 or con- 
sent of instructor. Theory and practice of collective bargaining; causes of 
industrial peace and conflict; government regulation of labor relations. 

Mr. Somers 

221. Economic Theory. I. 3 hr. Training and experience in use of analytical 
methods and techniques needed in dealing with fundamental economic prob- 
lems. Mr. Thompson 

222. History of Economic Thought. II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 221. Economic ideas in 
perspective of historic development. Mr. Thompson 

225. Transportation. I. 3 hr. Development of an inland transportation system and 
relations and policies of transport agencies. Mr. Campbell 



208 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



}S3 






230. Public Utilities. II. 3 hr. Development of regulation; economics of valuation 
and rate making. Mr. Campbell 

235. Business Cycles. I. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 125, or consent of instructor. Industrial 
fluctuations; causes and possible remedies. Mr. Fishman 

241. Public Finance. I. 3 hr. Fiscal organization and administration of modern gov- 
ernments; public expenditures; governmental revenues; problems of public 
debt. Mr. Tower 

242. Taxation. II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 241 or consent of instructor. Comparative study 
of taxes and tax systems. Particular emphasis upon tax structures of Federal 
government and State of West Virginia. Mr. Tower 

245. Government and Business. II. 3 hr. Government in its role of adviser and um- 
pire; analysis of governmental policies and practices affecting business. 

Mr. Fishman 

250. International Trade. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent of instructor. Development of 
trade among nations; theories of trade; policies; physical factors; trends; and 
barriers. Mr. Campbell 

-' //\NCB D 3T/i7/:r/cs 

310. Contemporary Economic Theory. II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 221. Recent developments 
in economic theory such as those relating to imperfect competition, monetary 
problems, and collectivist economy. Staff 

315. Bibliography and Research. I. 2 hr. Sources of information; research procedures; 
analysis and interpretation of data; preparation of manuscripts. 

Mr. Coleman 
319. Seminar in Economics. II. 2 hr. Staff 

331, 332. Thesis. I, II. 2 or 3 hr. Staff 

FINANCE 

111. Business Finance. I. II. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 1 and 2 or consent of instructor. 
Legal and economic aspects of business formation, operation, and readjustment; 
social control of business activity. Mr. Tower 

115. General Insurance. I. II. 3 hr. Theory of risk and its application to insurance; 
principles underlying all forms of insurance — life, property, casualty, fire, and 
surety. Mr. Wright 

120. Life Insurance. I. 2 hr. PR: Finance 115. Principles of life-insurance protection; 
legal regulation of insurance companies. Mr. Wright 

150. Investments. II. 3 hr. PR: Finance 111 or consent of instructor. Investment 
analysis and management for the individual and the firm. Mr. Tower 

161. Real Estate. I. 3 hr. Principles and practices of real estate business. Mr. Wright 

212. Problems in Business Finance. II. 3 hr. PR: Finance 111. A study of selected 
problems of business finance developed largely by the case method. Mr. Tower 

216. Casualty Insurance. II. 2 hr. PR: Finance 115. Nature of and reasons for ex- 
isting practices in casualty insurance. An analysis of liability, automobile, acci- 
dent and health, workmen* compensation, and other casualty coverages. 

Mr. Wright 

331. 332. Thesis. I, II, 2 or 3 hr. Staff 

MANAGEMENT 

111. Industrial Management. I, II. 3 hr. The assignment of managerial personnel to 
the specialized activities, location and lay-out of manufacturing plants, stand- 
ardization and simplification of equipment and processes, procurement issue 
and storage of material, production cost and labor efficiency, planning and 
scheduling of operations. Mr. Isaack 



\ 






THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 209 



112. Production Management. II. 3 hr. PR: Management 111. The management and 
administration of manufacturing and production activities with the proper 
coordination and control of them to achieve production goals. Mr. Isaack 

210. Problems of Small Business. II. 2 hr. PR: For seniors and graduate majors in 
the College of Commerce. Analysis of specific problems facing small businesses 
in our present-day American economy; specialized management course for stu- 
dents who wish to prepare as proprietors of a small business. Staff 

213. Problems in Business Administration. I, II. 1-3 hr. Staff 

216. Personnel Management. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Economics 115. Principles and practice 
in the direction, coordination, and remuneration of manpower. Mr. Isaack 

225. Business Policy. II. 3 hr. PR: Senior standing and consent of instructor. In- 
tegrated study of policies, organization, facilities, and control techniques of 
business enterprises. Mr. Coleman 

331. 332. Thesis. I, II. 2 or 3 hr. Staff 

MARKETING 

111. Principles of Marketing. I. II. 3 hr. Principles, policies, and practices followed 
by producer, wholesaler, and retailer in distribution of commodities to con- 
sumer. Mr. Brown 

112. Marketing Management. I. 3 hr. PR: Marketing 111. Case studies of market- 
ing activities in distribution of agricultural and manufactured commodities. 

Mr. Brown 
115. Principles of Retailing. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Marketing 111 and 112. Retail organ- 
ization, administration, planning, buying, expense analysis, and promotional 
activities. Mr. Brown 

120. Principles of Advertising. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Marketing 111 and 112. Introduction 
to principles and practices of advertising, including preparation of complete 
advertising campaign. Mr. Roberts 

210. Industrial Purchasing. I. 3 hr. PR: For seniors and graduate students. A sur- 
vey of corporate procurement problems facing modern purchasing executives. 

Mr. Roberts 

215. Marketing Research. I, II. 2 hr. PR: For seniors and graduate students in 
Marketing, and consent of instructor. The utilization of present-day marketing 
research techniques in the solution of practical marketing problems, with par- 
ocular reference to West Virginia Mr. Roberts 

331, 332. Thesis. I, II. 2 or 3 hr. Mr. Roberts 



SECRETARIAL S TUDIES 

51. Business Communications. II. 3 hr. PR: 6 hr. English composition and ability 
to type. Vocabulary and technique of business writing as applied to various 
forms of research and reporting. Miss Coutts 

61. Typewriting. I. 2 hr. For secretarial majors or consent of instructor. Instruc- 
tion in formation of accurate typing habits.* Miss Coutts 

62. Typewriting. I. II. 2 hr. PR: Secretarial Studies 61 or equivalent. For secre- 
tarial majors or consent of instructor.* Miss Coutts 

125. Shorthand. I. 4 hr. Gregg shorthand for beginners.* Miss Couits 

126. Shorthand. II. 4 hr. PR: Secretarial Studies 125, or equivalent. Intensive re- 
view of fundamental principles of Gregg shorthand; development of accurate 
writing and ability to transcribe business and manuscript materials.* 

Miss Coutts 



210 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



131. Secretarial Training and Office Practice. I, 3 hr. PR: Ability to type. Anal- 
ysis of common working problems of a secretary. Special emphasis on sources 
of information, procedures in filing, handling mail, planning itineraries, pre- 
paring material for publication, preparing minutes of meetings, and preparing 
statistical material.* Miss Coutts 

132. Transcription. II. 2 hr. PR: Consent of instructor. For advanced students of 
typewriting and shorthand.* Miss Coutts 



♦Credit will be allowed for Secretarial Studies majors in the College of 
Commerce and for students in the College of Education with Commerce teaching 
fields, only. 



The College of Education 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

In 1901 a Department of Education was established in the College of Arts and 
Sciences of West Virginia University. Subsequently, departments of education grew up 
hi the College of Engineering and the School of Music. In 1927 the College of 
Education was established by the Board of Governors of the University to unify 
professional training for school service. 

Through its undergraduate and graduate courses, its seminars, its laboratory 
schools, its field services, and its encouragement and direction of educational investi- 
gation, the College of Education aims to contribute to educational efficiency by in- 
culcating a liberal and more scientific conception of the functions of public schools 
and by providing the professional training of elementary-school and secondary-school 
teachers, principals, and supervisors, general school administrators, college teachers, 
educational counselors, and educational research specialists. 

The College of Education comprises the College with its resident courses of 
instruction and its facilities for research; University High School with its opportunities 
for observation, student teaching, directed supervision, and experimentation; Labora- 
tory Elementary School with its opportunities for observation, student teaching, and 
graduate study of pupil progress; and affiliated public schools for supervised student- 
teaching experience. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Methods of Entrance 

Candidates for admission to the University may be admitted either by exam- 
ination or on the basis of official transcripts of record. Transcripts of college or 
university record must be sent by the registrar of the other institution directly to 
the Registrar of the University immediately after the student has completed his 
work in that institution. Transcripts must be received by the Registrar at least 
three weeks prior to the semester or term in which the applicant is interested. 
The transcripts received in support of applications for admission become the 
property of the University and are permanently filed in the office of the Registrar. 

The requirements for admission to the College of Education are (a) grad- 
uation from a first-class high school with University entrance requirements satis- 
fied and (b) 58 semester hours of approved college work with an average of at 
least two grade points per credit hour on all work presented. Students in other 
colleges or universities who contemplate transferring to the College of Education 
should so order their courses of study as to meet junior standing and should be 
fulfilling the curricular requirements for the certification of teachers as stated in 
the College of Education Announcements. 

Adviser 

When the student enters the College of Education he is assigned an adviser from 
the College. The student will plan his program of work — required courses, electives. 
examinations, conference courses, etc. — in consultation with his adviser. Although 
the adviser desires to be helpful, this does not absolve the student from becoming 
familiar with all pertinent regulations and planning his program of work in accord- 
ance with the objective of his choice. 

Credit for Correspondence Work 

Credit up to a maximum of 30 semester hours for work completed by cor- 
respondence will be accepted by the University when such work is given by ac- 

211 



212 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



credited colleges or universities who accept this work for credit toward their own 
degrees and whose residence work is accepted by West Virginia University. In 
compliance with an order of the State Board of Education, however, credits obtained 
in correspondence courses will not be considered in certifying students for teachers' 
certificates. 

Maximum Work 

Students may not, without special permission, register in the College of Education 
for more than 18 hours during any semester and 6 hours during any summer term. 
Any student who desires to do irregular work, or to carry more than the prescribed 
maximum of hours, must obtain written permission from his adviser and the Scholar- 
ship Committee of the College. This permit is not valid until it has been filed with 
the Registrar. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



To be eligible for recommendation for the degree in Education (B.S. in Ed. and 
R.S. in El. Ed.) a candidate must: 

1. Comply with the general regulations as announced in this Bulletin and in the 
General Information section (Part I) of the University Catalog, concerning entrance, 
advanced standing, classification, examination, marks, grade points, etc. 

2. Satisfy the General Requirements for certification. 

3. Complete the required hours of approved courses in Education listed. 

4. Select and pursue two teaching fields for high-school teaching or the pre- 
scribed curriculum for elementary teaching. 

5. Adhere to the patterns prescribed in completing the teaching fields. 

6. Present 128 hours of approved college credit, with a general average of "C" 
as described under General Requirements for Certification. (Only credit earned in 
West Virginia University and at Potomac State School will be used in computing 
grade points for graduation.) The candidate must have been enrolled in the Col- 
lege of Education for at least his last 26 hours. 

7. Be at least 18 years of age, of good moral character, interested in educational 
work, and mentally, physically, and otherwise qualified to perform the duties of a 
teacher. 

Fulfillment of the requirements for graduation from the College of Education 
qualifies a candidate to apply for recommendation for a West Virginia first-class 
teaching certificate. 

General Requirements for Certification 

In order to teach in the public schools of West Virginia, one must hold a certifi- 
cate issued by the State Department of Education. Before any West Virginia Univer- 
sity applicant is eligible to receive a first-class State teaching certificate he must have 
(1) met the minimum State requirements, (2) met the University degree requirements, 
and (3) been recommended by the Dean of the College of Education as herein 
prescribed. 

The College of Education will inform each of its students who is a prospective 
teacher, and anv other prospective teacher, upon request, of the requirements for 
certification, and assist him in preparing a program of studies to meet these require- 
ments. It is the obligation of the student who desires such counsel to arrange a con- 
ference some time before the end of the sophomore year. 

A "C" average is required: (1) on the total college credits earned: (2) on the 
hours earned in professional subjects, including directed teaching: and (3) in each 
of the high school teaching fields or the non-education courses of the elementary field. 

The Dean of the College of Education recommends candidates for certification 
only after the completion of work for the baccalaureate degree. To be eligible for 
recommendation by the University for any West Virginia five-year teaching certifi- 
cate, the applicant must have done student teaching under the supervision of the 
College of Education. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



213 



At least 45 semester hours of upper-division work, West Virginia University 
standards, are required for all teaching certificates. A maximum of 24 semester hours 
of approved extension work is acceptable toward certification. Extension work should 
be approved by the student's adviser. The qualifications herein prescribed are min- 
imum, not optimum or maximum, and must be met by all candidates. 

For additional information about certification consult the Dean of the College of 
Education. 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR FIRST-CLASS CERTIFICATES 
VALID FOR FIVE YEARS 





Elementary 


First-class 


Special 


Required Courses 


School 


High School 


Nonacademic 


English 


Hr. 


Hr. 


Hr. 


Written and Spoken English 


6 


6 


6 


English 1, 2 OR 








Communications 1, 2 








Advanced Written & Spoken 


3 


3 


3 


English 18 or English 21 








(Com.) 








Study and Appreciation of 


3) 


3) 


3) 


Literature English 5 or 6 








(American) 










or 


or 


or 


English 3 or 4 (English) 


3) 


3) 


3) 


Backgrounds of (Child) Literature 


3 






Library Science 103 








Speech 3 or 11 


3 






Minimum Requirement 


18 


12 


12 


Social Science 


Hr. 


Hr. 


Hr. 


Development of Social 








Institutions 








History 1, 2 


6) 


6) 


6) 



Humanities 1, 2 
Fundamental Social Problems 

Social Science 1, 2 
American History 52, 53 
West Virginia History 150 
Geography 107 or 109 

Minimum Requirement 

Science and Mathematics 
General Biology 1, 2 



or 



8) 


8) 


8) 


8 


8 


8 


6 






3 






3 






26-28 


14-16 


14-16 


Hr. 


Hr. 


Hr. 




8) 


8) 



Physical Science 1, 2 (general) 
General Biology 1, 2 AND 

Physical Science 1 
OR 
Physical Science 1, 2 AND 

Biology 1 
Conservation 

Forestry 140 
Mathematics for teachers 

Arithmetic 6 

Minimum Requirement 



12 



18 



8) 



8) 



214 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 





Elementary 


First-class 


Special 




School 


High School 


Nonacademic 




Hr. 


Hr. 


Hr. 


Music 








Music 10 


2 


2 


2 


Music 11 


2 






Music 12 


2 






Minimum Requirement 


6 


2 


2 


Art 








Art 130 


2 


2 


2 


Art 1 


2 






Art 2 


2 






Minimum Requirement 


6 


2 


2 




Hr. 


Hr. 


Hr. 


Physical Well-Being 








Orientation-Physical Education 








For Men, Physical Education 1, 2 





2 


2 


For Men, Physical Education 1, 2, 








43 


4 








For Women, Physical Education 








1-16 





4 


4 


For Women, Physical Education 








41, 42, 43 


4 








Health Education 101 or 180 





2 


2 


Health Education 101 


2 








Professional Education 


Hr. 


Hr. 


Hr. 


Human Growth and Dev., Ed. 








105, 106 


6 


6 


6 


Adolescent Adjustment, Ed. 114 




3 


3 


Student Teaching Sec. Sch., Ed. 124 




4 


4 


Prin. of Tchg. Sec. Schools, Ed. 120 




2 


2 


Mat. and Meth. Sec. Sch., Ed. 








150-170 




2 


2 


Stud. Tchg. El. Sch. Mus., Ed. 115 






2 


Mat. and Meth. El. Sch. Mus., Ed. 








130 






2 


Approved Electives Sec. Ed. 




3 




Psych, and Management, El. Sch., 








Ed. 141 


3 






Mat. and Meth. in Basic Arts, 








Ed. 142 


5 






Mat. and Meth. in Content, 








Ed. 143 


5 






Student Teaching El. Sch., Ed. 144 


5 







Minimum Requirement 



24 



20 



21 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION AND FOR 
RECOMMENDATION FOR THE FIRST-CLASS ELE- 
MENTARY-SCHOOL TEACHING CERTIFICATE 

Foundation— Lower-Division Work 

In preparation for admission to the College of Education and the work of pre- 
paring for teaching in elementary schools, students will register the freshman and 
sophomore years in the College of Arts and Sciences and pursue the program of 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 215 



general education that the State Board of Education has prescribed for all students 
who seek recommendation for teaching certificates. This program of prescribed work 
is included in the "Curriculum for Elementary-School Teachers" following herewith. 

Training— Upper-Division Work 

Admission: For admission to the prescribed courses in Elementary Education, 
(Educ. 141, 142, 143, and 144) , including the noncredit Conference courses (Educ. 
A, B, C, and D), students will register the final two years in the College of Education. 

Examinations: Students in the prescribed work in Elementary Education must 
demonstrate a working knowledge and understanding in the subjects of the ele- 
mentary school. They must meet the minimum standards set by examinations. 

Health Certificate: For admission to and continuation in the prescribed work in 
Elementary Education and for certificate recommendation, students must obtain, and, 
when advised with the approval of the University Health Service, renew a special 
health certificate, showing freedom from physical defects and contagion and a 
condition of good health. 

Subject Matter: In lower-division work students should pursue the lower-division 
required courses indicated herein, so that the greatest possible number of hours of 
their electives may be courses giving upper-division credit. The electives indicated 
do not constitute a teaching field. Students in the program of Elementary Education 
do not complete majors and minors. In consultation with their advisers, students will 
choose electives in several fields of work according to their needs as well as their 
personal interests. 

Conference Courses: Students during their junior and senior years must register 
in the noncredit conference courses, Education A, B, C, and D. 

Graduation and Certification Requirements: To become eligible for recommenda- 
tion for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education and for the 
First-Class Elementary-School Teaching Certificate, the student must complete the 
following curriculum and plan of work with a grade average of "C" or better in (1) 
noneducation courses, (2) Education courses, and (3) directed teaching; and have 
been enrolled in the College of Education for at least 26 semester hours of work, 
including Educ. 142, 143, and 144 and Educ. A, B, C, and D. 

CURRICULUM FOR ELEMENTARY-SCHOOL TEACHERS 

English Hr. Music Hr. 

(18 semester hours) (6 semester hours) 

English 1 , 2 Music 10 2 

OR Music 11 2 

Communications 1,2 6 Music 12 2 

English 18 Art 

OR (6 semester hours) 

Communications 21 3 Art 130 2 

English 3, 4, 5, or 6 3 Art 1 2 

Speech 3 or 11 3 Art 2 2 

Library Science 103 3 Health and Physical Education 

Social Studies (6 semester hours) 

(26 semester hours) Health Education 101 2 

Historv 1, 2 Phvsical Education 1 and 2 (Men) 

OR OR 

Humanities 1, 2 6-8 Physical Education 41 and 

Social Sciences 1,2 8 42 (Women) 2 

Geography 107 or 109 3 Physical Education 43 2 

History 150 3 Education 

History 52, 53 6 (24 semester hours) 

Science and Mathematics Education 105 3 

(18 semester hours) Education 106 3 

Biological Sciences 1, 2 Education 141 3 

AND Education 142 5 



216 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Physical Science 1 

OR 
Physical Sciences 1, 2 

AND 

Biological Science 1 12 

Forestry 140 3 

Mathematics 6 3 



Education 143 5 

Education 144 5 

Education A, B, C, D No credit 

Electives 

(24 semester hours) 



Electives do not constitute a teaching field, a major or a minor. They are courses 
in variety to meet individual needs. 



PLAN OF WORK 

FIRST YEAR 



First Semester 

English 1 or Communications 1 . 

History 1 or Humanities 1 

Physical Science 1 or Biology 1 . 

Music 10 

Physical Education 1 (M) , 41 (W) 



Hr. 

. 3 
3-4 



Second Semester Hr. 

English 2 or Communications 2 . . . 3 

History 2 or Humanities 2 3-4 

Physical Science 2 or Biology 2 . . . . 4 

Art 130 2 

Physical Education 2 (M), 42 (W) . 1 
Mathematics 6 3 



16-17 



16-17 



SECOND YEAR 



First Semester Hr. 

English 18 or Communications 21 . . 3 

History 52 3 

Music 11 2 

Art 1 2 

Social Science 1 4 

Education 105 3 



Second Semester Hr. 

English 3, 4, 5, or 6 3 

History 53 3 

Music 12 2 

Art 2 2 

Social Science 2 4 

Education 106 3 



17 



17 



THIRD YEAR 



First Semester Hr. 

Library Science 103 3 

Geography 107 or 109 3 

Health Education 101 2 

Physical Education 43 2 

Biological Science 1 or 

Physical Science 1 4 

Education 141 3 

Education A 



Second Semester 
Conservation 

Forestry 140 
History 



150 



Hr. 



Education 142 5 

Education B 

Electives 6 



17 



17 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Semester Hr. 

Education 143 5 

Education C 

Electives 11 



Second Semester Hr. 

Education 144 5 

Education D 

Electives 7 



16 



12 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 21' 



REQUIRED COURSES AND HOURS AND APPROVED ELECTIVES 

IN EDUCATION FOR A FIRST-CLASS HIGH SCHOOL 

TEACHING CERTIFICATE 

(A minimum of 20 semester hours of approved Education courses is required 
for a West Virginia First-Class High School Teaching Certificate, and a 
maximum of 24 semester hours will be accepted.) 

I. Required Courses Semester Hours 

Sophomore or Junior Year 
Ed. 105. Educational Psychology— Human 

Growth and Development 3 

Ed. 106. Educational Psychology— The 

School Program and Pupil Development 3 

Senior Year 

Ed. 124. Student Teaching 4) to be 

Ed. 150-170. Materials and Methods 2) taken as 

Ed. 120. Principles of Teaching in Secondary Schools 2) a block 

Ed. 114,. Educational Psychology— Adolescent Adjustment 3 

NOTE: If the student's major is Library Science or Speech, he will do his prac- 
tice teaching- in his other field. 

II. Approved Electives in Secondary Education— Junior or Senior Year. 

109. Secondary Education 

136. High School Program of Studies 

150-170. Materials and Methods in Another Field 

197. Survey of Vocational Education 

203. Organization and Administration of Adult Education 

212. High School Tests and Measures 

221. Audio- visual Resources for Instruction 

222. Current Practices in Secondary Education 
231. Philosophy of Education 

233. Educational Sociology 

259. Special Problems in Music Education 

262. Vocational Home Economics in Secondary Schools 
or 

266. Adult Education in Homemaking 

276. Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Classes 
or 

277. Organizing and Directing Supervised Farming Programs 

281. History of Elementary and Secondary Education in the United States 

282. Development of Modern Education 

284. Pupil Personnel Administration 

285. The Junior High School 
291. Exploratory Reading 

REQUIREMENTS FOR PROVISIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
CERTIFICATES 

Provisional High-School certificates (valid for 1 year for teaching in junior and/or 
senior high schools) will be issued to applicants who meet the following require- 
ments: 

1 . Graduation and recommendation by the Dean of the College of Education. 

2. General Requirements: Fifteen hours of secondary education to be selected from 
the courses applicable for a first-class high school certificate. Three-fourths of 
the teaching subject-matter requirements and not fewer than one-half of the 
requirements of each division of each teaching field as designated for first-class 
high school certificates. 



218 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



High School Teaching Fields 

First Other 

Teaching Teaching 
AGRICULTURE Field Field 

Voc. Gen. Gen. 

Minimum Requirement 50 hr. 40 hr. 24 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

1. Farm crops, soils, and horticulture 11 6 6 

2. Animal, dairy, and poultry husbandry .... 13 6 6 

3. Agricultural Economics 6 3 3 

4. Agricultural Mechanics 9 3 3 

5. Plant or Animal Pathology 3-4 3-4 3-4 

II. Electives in above fields and Forestry, 

Genetics, & Entomology 7-8 19 3 

NOTE: Teachers of Vocational Agriculture must be approved by the State 
Supervisor of Vocational Agriculture. 

First Other 

at>j> Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Requirement 32 hr. * 24 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

1 . Freehand Drawing 6 6 

2. Design 6 6 

3. Painting 6 6 

4. Modeling 2 2 

5. History and Appreciation of Art 8 4 

II. Electives (unrestricted) 4 

NOTE: Students applying for the Special Non- Academic Certificate are required 
to complete 40 semester hours in Art. 

First Other 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Required 32 hr. 24 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

1. Biology 1, 2 8 8 

2. Inorganic Chemistry (gen.) or 

Phys. Sci. 1, 2 8 6 

NOTE: Botany 2 and Zoology 3 may be offered for Biology 2. 

II. Electives 16 10 

No more than four hours may be offered from any one of the groups below: 
1. Animal Pathology 

2. Bacteriologv 

3. Biology (except Biology 1 and 2) 

4. Botanv (except Botany I, 2) 

5. Entomology 

6. Forestry 

7. Genetics 

8. Plant Pathology 

9. Zoology (except Zoology 1, 2. 3) 
10. Conservation 101s, 201s 

NOTE: A candidate for a teaching certificate who elects Biological Science as a 
first teaching field may not elect Biological and General Science as a second 
teaching field. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



219 



First Other 

Teaching Teaching 

BIOLOGICAL AND GENERAL SCIENCE Field Field 

Minimum Required 42 hr. 34 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

1. Biology (same as for Biological 

Science) 8 8 

2. Inorganic Chemistry (gen.) 8 8 

3. Physics 8 8 

4. Geology (not geography) 3-4 2 

II. Electives same as for Biological Science electives 14-15 8 

NOTE: A candidate for a teaching certificate who elects Biological and General 
Science as a firit teaching field may not elect Biological Science as a second 
teaching field. 

Other First 

Teaching Teaching 

COMMERCE Field Field 

Minimum Required 32 hr. 27 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

1. Business Mathematics (Math. 8) 3 3 

2. Accounting: Accounting 1,2 6 6 

3. Retailing: Marketing 111, 115 3 3 

4. Typewriting: Secretarial Studies 61, 62 • . . 4 4 

5. Shorthand: Secretarial Studies 125, 126 . . 8 8 

6. Secretarial Training and Office Practice: 

Secretarial Studies 131 3 3 

II. Electives (unrestricted in the field) 5 

First Other 

Teaching Teaching 
ENGLISH Field Field 

Minimum Required 36 hr. 24 hr. 

I. Required Courses (Exclusive of Freshman English Courses) 

1. Written and Spoken English 6 6 

a. English 18 (3 hr.) or 

Communications 21 (3 hr.) 

b. Speech 3, 6, 11, or 29 (3 hr.) 

2. Literature 12 12 

a. English 3 & 4, or 163, 164 

(Survey: English Literature) (6 hr.) 

b. English 5 and 6 (Survey: 
American Literature) (6 hr.) 

II. Electives 

I . Literature 12-16 6 

(Upper-division type or period courses: 

maximum of 3 hrs. in any one type or 

period.) 
2- Composition, Journalism, Speech, 

Librarv Science 2-6 



220 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



First Other 

FRENCH Teaching Field 

Field Teaching 

Minimum Required 30 hr. 24 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

1. Elementary French 

(Grammar & Reading) 1&2 6 6 

2. Intermediate French 5 & 6 6 6 

3. Advanced Grammar, Conversation 

& Composition, 109, 110, 231 6 6 

4. Literature of the 17th, 18th, 

& 19th centuries, 115, 116, 118 6 6 

II. Elective Courses in French 103, 104, 217 6 

NOTE: Two semester hours may be deducted for each hig-h school unit, with a 
maximum deduction of 6 hours. Regardless of the deduction allowed for hig-h 
school credit, the student must still complete a minimum of 24 semester hours 
in each teaching field. 



Other First 

GERMAN Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Required 30 hr. 24 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

1 . Elementary German 1 & 2 6 6 

2. Intermediate German 3 & 4 6 6 

3. Spoken German 111, 112 6 6 

4. Survey of German Lit., 245 3 3 

5. History of German Lang., 251 3 

II. Elective Courses in German (unrestricted) 6 3 

NOTE: Two semester hours may be deducted for each high school unit, with a 
maximum deduction of 6 hours. Regardless" of the deduction allowed for high 
school credit, the student must still complete a minimum of 24 semester hours in 
each teaching- field. 

First Other 

HOME ECONOMICS Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Voc. Gen. Gen. 

Minimum Required 36 hr. 24 hr. 24 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

1. Foods and Nutrition 8 6 6 

2. Textiles and Clothing 8 6 6 

3. Applied Art 8 4 4 

4. Home Management (to include 

Home Management Residence) 8 3 3 

5. Child Development 2 2 2 

II. Elective Courses in Home Economics (unrestricted) 2 3 3 

NOTE: Teachers of Ideational Home Economics must be approved by the State 
Supervisor of Vocational Home Economics. 

First Other 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Required 32 hr. 24 hr. 

1 . Drawing— (at least one course in Mechanical 

Drawing) Mechanical Engineering 

20, 25 or 26 4 4 

Art 11 (111), 12 (112), 113, 114, 
117, 118, 121, 122, 123, 126 

2. General Shop— Education 107; and 

250 or 206 3 3 

3. Organization of Industrial Arts- 

Education 294, 364 2 2 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 221 



4. Shops Total 23 15 

To be taken in three or more shop areas 

with a minimum of 6 semester hours 

in one and not less than 3 semester hours 

in each additional area, such as: 

Metal Working— Education 240, 241 

Automotive— Education 247, 320 

Ceramics— Education 243; Art 106; Chemical Engineering 160, 260, 261, 

264, 267, 268 
Design— Art 121, 122; Agricultural Mechanics 159 
Electricity— Electrical Engineering 10, 110; Agricultural Mechanics 170, 

270; Education 248 
Foundry— Education 240 
General Metal— Education 104, 205 
Leather Craft-Education 244, 320; Art 127 
Machine Shop-Mechanical Engineering 11, 12, 16, 105, 106, 107; 

Education 207 
Printing— Education 246; Journalism 110 
Photography— Physics 116 

Radio— Physics 113, 114; Electrical Engineering 250, 252 
Plastics— Education 245 
Sheet Metal— Education 249 
Woodwork— Education 102, 103, 204, 208, 242; Agricultural Mechanics 

20, 252 
Welding— Mechanical Engineering 7, 15 
(No credits may be counted twice by being submitted in more than one group.) 

First Other 

ITALIAN Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Required 30 hr. 24 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

1. Elementary Italian 1,2 6 6 

2. Intermediate Italian 5, 6 6 6 

3. Grammar, Composition and 

Conversation 109, 1 10 6 6 

4. Italian Literature 115, 116 6 6 

II. Elective courses in Italian 6 

NOTE: Two semester hours may be deducted for each high school unit, with a 
maximum deduction of 6 hours. Regardless of the deduction allowed for high 
school credit, the student must complete a minimum of 24 semester hours in 
each teaching- field. 

First Other 

LATIN Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Required 30 hr. 24 hi. 

I. Required Courses 

1. Grammar & Composition 1,2 6 4 

2. Cicero's Orations 4, 203 3 3 

3. Vergil's Aeneid 6, 235 3 3 

II. Elective Courses in Latin (unrestricted) 18 14 

NOTE: Two semester hours may be deducted for each high school unit, with a 
maximum deduction of 6 hours. Regardless of the deduction allowed for high 
school credit, the student must still complete a minimum of 24 semester hours 
in each teaching field. 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



First Other 

Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Required 24 hr. 24 hr. 
1. Required Courses 

1 . Using Books & Libraries 1 2 2 

2. Reference & Bibliography 101 3 3 

3. Children's Literature & Story Telling 103 . . 3 3 

4. Book Selection 104 2 2 

5. Book Selection for Adolescents 105 2 2 

6. History of Books & Libraries 106 3 3 

7. Administration of School Lib. 107 3 3 

8. Library Practice 108 3 3 

9. Cataloguing & Classification 102 3 3 

First Other 

MATHEMATICS Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Required 24 hr. 22 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

1. College Algebra 2, 3 3 3 

2. Plane Trig. 4 or 10 3 3 

3. Solid Ceometry 7 3 3 

4. Analytic Geometry 5 4 4 

5. Calculus 107, 108' 8 

II. Electives: Any of the following: 106, 107, 108, 130, 

238, 239, 240, 241, 244, 246, 247 3 9 

NOTE: Two semester hours may be deducted in the second teaching- field for 
each high school unit with a maximum of 6 hours deduction, unless the equivalent 
courses are taken for university credit. 

Special Other 

MUSIC Nonacademic Teaching 

Certificate Field 

Minimum Required 50 hr. 24 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

1. Theory 1, 2, 3. Music 117, 118 or 119 16 6 

2. Applied Music, including Piano, Voice, 

Band & Orch. Instru 12 9 

3. History or Appreciation 6 3 

4. Conducting & Musical Organ 6 4 

5. Public School Music 185 & Choral 
Techniques and/or Instrumental 

Techniques 5 

II. Elective Courses in Music (unrestricted) 5 2 

NOTE: Students applying for the special nonacademic Certificate are required 
to complete 50 hours in Music. 

First Other 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Required 35 hr. 26 or 27 hr. 

1. Anatomy and Kinesiology, Physical 

Education 175 5 5 

OR 

2. Physiology: Zoology 171 4 4 

3. Health Education: Health Education 2, 

Health Education 101 4 4 

4. Principles of Organization and Adminis- 
tration of Physical Education- 
Physical Education 278 3 3 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



223 



Physical Inspection and Correction of 
Remedial Defects— Men, Physical 
Education 176 

Women, Physical Education 178 

Theory and Practice in Physical Education 



Men Women 



2 
13 

Men Women 



A. Orientation: Physical Education 

71, Recreation 1 4 4 

Physical Education 71 2 2 

B. Team Sports: Physical Education 

151, Physical Education 152 . 5 5 

Team Sports: Physical Education 
31, 32, 63 3 3 

C. Recreational Activities: Physical 

Education 53, 54, 123 3 3 

Recreational Activities: Physical 

Education 33, 54, 61 3 3 

D. School and Community Activities: 

Physical Education 121, 
Recreation 2, Physical Educa- 
tion 66 3 2-4 

Physical Education 66, 127, 

Recreation 2 4 2-4 

E. Rhythmic Activities: Physical 

Education 132, 135 2 1 

Physical Education 35, 36, 67, 

132, 133, 135 3 3 

First Other 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Required 36 hr. 24 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

Chemistry 

1. Chemistry 1, 2 (gen.) (Inorg.) 8 8 

2. Qualita. 5 or 105, Quanita. 6 or 106, 

Organic 31 or 131 4 4 

Physics 

1. Physics 1, 2, 3, 4. (gen.) 8 8 

II. Electives— at least four hr. must be in Chemistry 

and/or Physics 16 4 

1. Chemistry 

2. Physics 

3. Geology (not geography) 

NOTE: A candidate for a teaching certificate who elects Physical Science as a 
first teaching field may not elect Physical and General Science as a second 
teaching- field. Phys. Sci. 1, 2 not accepted. 



224 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



First Other 

PHYSICAL AND GENERAL SCIENCE Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Required 42 hr. 34 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

Chemistry 

1 . Inorg. Chem. 1, 2 (General) 8 8 

2. Qualita. Analysis 5, 105, Quanita. 

Analysis 6, 106. Organic Chem. 31 or 131 . 4 4 

Physics 

1. Physics 1, 2, 3, 4 (General) 8 8 

Biologx 

1 . ' Biology 1 , 2 (General) 8 8 

Geology 

- 1 . Geology 1, 2 (General) 3-4 2 

II. Electiyes (same as Phys. Science, Chemistry, 

Physics, Biology, otherwise) 10-11 4 

NOTE: A candidate for a teaching- certificate who elects Physical and General 
Science as a first teaching- field may not elect Physical Science as a second 
teaching field. 

First Other 

SOCIAL STUDIES Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Required 36 hr. 24 hr. 
I. Required Courses 

1 . History 9 9 

Am. History 52 and 53 

W. \"a. History 150 or 250 

2. Political Science 3 3 

Political Science 5 

3. Economics 1,2 3 3 

i Only 3 hr. required for certification, but 

students desiring to take tipper diyision 
courses in Economics must ha\e both 1 and 
2 as prerequisites.) 

4. Sociology 1,2 3 3 

5. Geography 107. 109, 1 16 3 3 

If. Electiyes (unrestricted in the five 

departments listed) 15* 3 

•At least 9 hours must be in the upper division. 

First Other 

SPANISH Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Required 30 hr. 24 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

1 . Elementary Spanish 1,2 6 6 

2. Intermediate Spanish 5, 6 6 6 

3. Adv. Grammar, Conyersation & 

Pronunciation 109, 1 10 6 6 

4. Survey of Literature 211, 212 6 6 

II. Elective Courses in Spanish 103, 104. 216 6 6 

NOTE: Two semester hours may be deducted for each high school unit, with a 
maximum deduction of 6 hours. Regardless of the deduction allowed for high 
school credit, the student must still complete a minimum of 24 semester hours 
in each teaching field. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



First Other 

SPEECH Teaching Teaching 

Field Field 

Minimum Required 36 hr. 24 hr. 

I. Required Courses 

1. Voice and Diction 3 3 3 

2. Acting 6 3 

3. Public Speaking 11 3 3 

4. Oral Interpretation 29 3 

5. Theatrical Methods and Practices 50 3 

6. Group Discussion 120 3 

7. Argumentation and Debate 121 3 3 

8. Introduction to Radio 140 3 

9. Play Directing 162 3 3 

10. Speech Correction 250 3 3 

II. Electives 6 9 

NOTE: Teachers of Speech must be certified in two fields. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES 

Certification: To qualify to take the final examination for the Master's Degree in 
Education the candidate must present evidence that he holds a First-Class Teaching 
Certificate in West Virginia or its equivalent in another state. 

Curriculum: At least 10 of the required 30-36 hours of approved graduate work 
shall be in Education; and the combined undergraduate and graduate curriculum 
shall contain a minimum of 30 semester hours of Education. 






<^l^ 



OPTIONAL ROUTES TOWARD A MASTER'S DEGREE IN 
EDUCATION 

A. Thirty semester hours, including a maximum of six semester hours of research 

(Education 362. Thesis) and the remaining hours in approved course work. 
Examination (oral, written, or both, at the discretion of the individual mem- 
bers of the committee) by the candidate's advisory committee. 

B. Thirty semester hours, including three semester hours on a problem (Ed. 

360, Problem) satisfactory to the adviser onlv, and 27 semester hours of 
approved course work. Examination (oral, written, or both, at the dis- 
cretion of the individual members of the committee) by the advisory com- 
mittee. 

C. Thirty-six semester hours, including a minimum of 10 semester hours of 
approved course work outside the field of Education. Examination (oral, 
written, or both, at discretion of the individual members of the committee) 
by a committee of at least three. 



Graduate Advisers 

Each Education student enrolled in the Graduate School will be directed by the 

appropriate one of the following advisers: 

Professor Allen: Industrial Arts and Vocational Education 

Professor Baldwin: Superintendents; general school administration 

Professors Hill and Butler: Vocational Agricultural Education 

Professor Hudelson: Graduate specials, secondary principals 

Professors Noer and Brown: Home Economics Education 

Professors Cook, Fulton, and Schultz: Secondary-school classroom teachers 

Professors Wheat, Feaster, and Fish: Elementary-school classroom teachers and 

principals 

Professor Jarecke: Counselors and classroom teachers 
Professor Scott: General and special supervisors 



226 (TRRICl I.A AND COURSES 



GRADUATE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Requirements for admission to graduate work in Education leading to Master's 
Degree: 

1. General requirements for admission to the Graduate School. 

2. First-class teaching certificate or at least 17 hours of undergraduate credit in 
Education. To receive a graduate degree in Education the candidate also must meet 
requirements for a first -class teaching certificate. 

CURRICULUM FOR SUPERINTENDENTS 

Degree: Master of Arts 

Required courses 25 Hr. 

Ed. 203. Organization and Administration ot Adult Education, 

OR Ed. 357, Organization and Administration of Vocational 

Education 2 

Ed. 231. Philosophy of Education, OR Ed. 233, Educational Sociology ..3 

Ed. 316. Psychology of Elementary-school Subjects 2 

Ed. 326. Practice in the Supervision of Elementary-school Instruction . .2 
Ed. 335. The Elementary-school Curriculum, OR Ed. 336. The 

Secondary-school Curriculum 2 

Ed. 339. Public-schooi Organization and Administration .. 2 

Ed. 340. Public-school Finance 2 

Ed. 341. School Buildings and Equipment, OR Ed. 343 School Surveys, 

OR Ed. 344, Staff Personnel Administration 2 

Ed. 346. Principles of Supervision ... 2 

Ed. 353. The Secondary-school Principal 2 

Ed. 356. The Elementary-school Principal 2 

Ed. 372. Statistical Methods in Education 2 

Other requirements 5-11 Hr. 

Option A-Thesis (Ed. 362) , 6 hr 6 

Option B-Problem (Ed. 360) , 3 hr. Elective, 2 hr., to be 

chosen with adviser's approval 5 

Option C— Electives, at least 10 hours in academic fields, to be 

chosen with adviser's approval 11 



Total for Master's Degree 30-36 Hr. 

Note: For those who already hold a Master's Degree and who wish to qualify 
for the University's recommendation for a Superintendent's Certificate, the follow- 
ing courses (described above) will satisfy: 

Required courses 16 Hr. 

General Administration: Ed. 339; 340; 203 or 357; 341 or 343 or 344 . .4-8 Hr. 

Elementary-school Administration: Ed. 326, 335*, 356 4 Hr. 

Secondary-school Administration: Ed. 327, 336*, 346, 353 4 Hr. 

The School Laws of West Virginia require "At least 5 years of experience in 
teaching, administration or supervision, or any combination thereof aggregating five 
years." In addition, a health certificate is required. 

Since most of the courses listed above have prerequisites, the consent of the 
instructor must be obtained before enrollment. 

*Ed. 335 or 336 (not both) can be accepted. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 227 



CURRICULUM FOR HIGH-SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 10 

Degree: Master of Arts 

I. Required courses (in approximate order listed) 14 Hr. 

Ed. 339. Public-school Organization and Administration 

(take early) 2 

Ed. 346. Principles of Supervision (take early) 2 

Ed. 372. Statistical Methods in Education 2 

Ed. 336. The Secondary-school Curriculum 2 

Ed. 284. Pupil-personnel Administration 2 

OR Ed. 373, Basic Course in Principles and Practices 

of Guidance 3 

Ed. 353. The Secondary-school Principal (take late) 2 

Ed. 327. Practice Supervision of Secondary-school Instruction 

(take late) 2-3 

II. Cognates 6-8 Hr. 

Ed. 259. Special Problems in Music Education 2 

Ed. 284. Pupil-personnel Administration 2 

OR Ed. 373, Basic Course in Principles and Practices 

of Guidance 3 

Ed. 322. Organizing Programs of Audio-visual Instruction 2 

Ed. 357. Organization of Programs in Vocational Education 2 

Ed. 360. Problem in Education OR Ed. 362, Thesis in Education 3-6 

Phys. Ed. 378. Problems in Physical Education, Health, and Recreation 2 
Social Work 212. Social Agency Observation OR Social Work 260, 

Problems of Child Welfare OR Social Work 285, Development 

of Social Services 3 

III. Academic 10-14 Hr. 

Academic courses in two or more recognized secondary-school 
teaching fields. These courses are to be chosen with the adviser's 
approval and are to be of a nature which will better qualify the 
principal to supervise the classroom instruction of the kinds of 
courses offered in modern secondary schools. 

IV. Free Electives 0-6 Hr. 

Total for Master's Degree 30-36 Hr. 

NOTE: Those already holding- a Master's Degree, who desire to qualify for a 
West Virginia high school principal's certificate, will be required to have the 
fourteen hours listed in Section I and six hours from Section II to be recom- 
mended for a certificate. 

CURRICULUM FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 11 

Degree: Master of Arts 

Required courses 14 Hr. 

I. Elementary-school Administration 

Ed. 339. Public-school Organization and Administration 2 

Ed. 356. The Elementary-school Principal 2 

II. Elementary-school Supervision 

Ed. 326. Practice in the Supervision of Elementary-school Instruction ...2 

loCompletion of this curriculum also fulfills the scholastic requirements for 
certification in West Virginia as a high school principal. Other requirements for 
the high school principal's certificate are (1) graduation from a standard col- 
lege or university and qualifications for a first-class high school teaching cer- 
tificate; (2) three years of secondary-school teaching experience; and (3) a 
health certificate. Since most of the courses in this curriculum have prerequi- 
sites, the consent of the instructor must be obtained before enrollment. 

nCompletion of this curriculum also fulfills the Education requirements for 
the elementary-school principal's certificate. Other requirements are (1) possession 
of a first-class elementary collegiate certificate; (2) three years of elementary- 
school teaching experience; and (3) a health certificate. 



228 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Ed. 346. Principles of Supervision 2 

III. Other required courses: 

Ed. 308. Psychology of Arithmetic 2 

Ed. 309. Psychology of Reading 2 

Ed. 335. The Elementary-school Curriculum 2 

IV. One or more courses from the following: 

Ed. 304. Remedial Techniques in Elementary-school Subjects 2 

Ed. 305. County Educational Clinic 2 

Ed. 306. Geography in the Elementary School 2 

Ed. 307. Health and Science in the Elementary School 2 

Ed. 316. Psychology of Elementary-school Subjects 2 

Electives (For Op. C at least 10 hours in academic fields) , and other courses 

in Education, to be chosen with approval of adviser 14-20 Hr 

V. Op. A 

OR 



Op. B 

OR 

Op. C 



Thesis, 6 hr.; Electives, 8 hr 14 Hr. 

Problem, 3 hr.; Electives, 11 hr 14 Hr. 

Academic, 10 hr.; Electives, 10 hr 20 Hr. 

Total for Master's Degree 30-36 Hr. 



NOTE: An elective may be Education or academic, and must have adviser's 
approval. 

CURRICULUM FOR SECONDARY-SCHOOL CLASSROOM 
TEACHERS 

Degree: Master of Arts 

Required graduate courses in Education 10-20 Hr. 

Suggested courses 

Ed. 203. Adult Education 2 

Ed. 212. High-school Tests and Measures 3 

Ed. 221. Audio- visual Resources for Instruction 2 

Ed. 222. Current Practices in Secondary Education 2 

Ed. 231. Philosophy of Education 3 

Ed. 233. Educational Sociology 3 

Ed. 251. Production of Audio-visual Resources 2 

Ed. 258. Education for Special Groups 2 

Ed. 259. Special Problems in Music Education 2 

Ed. 281. History of Elementary and Secondary Education in the 

United States 3 

Ed. 282. Development of Modern Education 2 

Ed. 284. Pupil-personnel Administration 2 

Ed. 285. The Junior High School 2 

Ed. 291 . Exploratory Reading ... 2 

Ed. 322. Organizing Programs of Audio-visual Instruction 2 

Ed. 336. The Secondary-school Curriculum ' 2 

Ed. 346. Principles of Supervision 2 

Ed. 367. Teaching the Social Studies in Elementary and Secondary 

Schools 2 

Ed. 372. Statistical Methods in Education 2 

Ed. 373. Basic Course in the Principles and Practices of Guidance 3 

Ed. 390. Advanced Courses for Teachers of English 2 

Ed. 392. Materials for General Reading 2 

Ed. 360. A Problem in Education OR Thesis 3 

Required graduate courses in a recognized teaching field 10-20 Hr. 

Required graduate courses in tributary or supplemental fields 0-10 Hr. 

Total for Master's Degree 30-36 Hr. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 229 



All courses are to be selected by the candidate subject to the approval of his 
adviser so as to fulfill the above requirements. 

NOTE: This curriculum does not qualify for a certificate. 

CURRICULUM FOR ELEMENTARY-SCHOOL CLASSROOM 
TEACHERS 

Degree: Master of Arts 

Required courses 14 Hr. 

I. To include: 

Ed. 308. Psychology of Arithmetic 2 

Ed. 309. Psychology of Reading 2 

Ed. 335. The Elementary-school Curriculum 2 

II. Other Phases of Elementary Education (8 Hr.)— 

four or more additional courses elected from: 

Ed. 304. Remedial Techniques in Elementary-school Subjects 2 

Ed. 305. County Educational Clinic 2 

Ed. 306. Geography in the Elementary School 2 

Ed. 307. Health and Science in the Elementary School 2 

Ed. 316. Psychology of Elementary-school Subjects 2 

III. Op. A 

OR 
Op. B 



OR 
Op. C 



Thesis, 6 hr.; Electives, 10 hr 16 Hr. 

Problem, 3 hr.; Electives, 13 hr 16 Hr. 

Academic, 10 hr.; Electives, 12 hr 22 Hr. 

Total for Master's Degree 30-36 Hr. 



NOTE: An elective may be Education or academic, and must have adviser's 
approval. 

NOTE: This curriculum does not qualify for a certificate. 

CURRICULUM FOR HOME-ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Degree: Master of Science 

Required graduate courses in Education 10-20 Hr. 

Required graduate courses in Home Economics 10-20 Hr. 

Required graduate courses in tributary fields 0-10 Hr. 

Total for Master's Degree 30-36 Hr. 

CURRICULUM FOR COUNSELORS 12 

Degree: Master of Arts 

Required courses 16 Hr. 

Ed. 373.* Basic Course in Principles and Practices of Guidance 3 

Ed. 374.* Counseling Techniques 2 

♦Completion of 12 semester hours alone as indicated by starred courses will 
contribute to endorsement as a teacher-counselor. Other requirements for 
certification as a teacher-counsleor are possession of a first-class certificate 
and 2 years' teaching- experience at the level at which guidance is to be done. 

If a Master's Degree has been earned in some other field, certification as a 
counselor may be procured by having 25 semester hours' credit, 15 in the re- 
quired list and 10 from the electives. 

i2Completion of this curriculum also fulfills the scholastic requirements in 
West Virginia for a Counselor's Certificate. Other requirements are (1) a 
first-class teaching certificate at the level at which the guidance is to be done; 
(2) 2 years of successful teaching experience at the level at which the guidance 
is to be done; and (3) cumulative wage-earning experience to a total of no less 
than 1,400 clock hours of regular paid employment, as certified by the employer 
or employers, in agriculture, commerce and industry, or 16 weeks in a co- 
operative work-experience counselor-training program. 



230 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Ed. 375.* Individual Inventory Techniques 2 

Ed. 376.* Occupational Information Techniques 2 

Ed. 377.* Special Counseling Problems 3 

Ed. 378.* Advanced Studies of Human Adjustment OR Ed. 212. High- 
School Tests and Measures 2 

Ed. 379.* Organization and Administration of Guidance Services 2 

Approved electives 9-14 Hr. 

Psychology - 205, 222, 224, 225, 229, 234, 236, 250, 251 

Economics — 239, Bus. 245 

Social Work - 212, 220, 251, 260, 301, 302, 315 

Education - 284, 212, 258, 357, 360, 372 

Sociology - 210, 211, 233, 244 
Free electives 0-6 Hr. 

Total for Master's Decree 30-36 Hr. 

CURRICULUM FOR INDUSTRIAL-ARTS TEACHERS AND 
SUPERVISORS 

Degree: Master of Arts 

Required from this group 10 Hr. 

Ed. 294. Organization of Industrial Arts 2 

Ed. 339. Public-school Organization and Administration 2 

Ed. 346. Principles of Supervision 2 

Ed. 357. Organization of Programs in Vocational Education 2 

Ed. 364. Advanced Methods in Teaching Industrial Arts 2 

Ed. 373. Basic Course in Principles and Practices of Guidance 3 

Electives from this group 10 Hr. 

Rec. 204. Recreation Hobbies 3 

Ed. 203. Adult Education 2 

Ed. 221. Audio-visual Resources for Instruction 2 

Ed. 222. Current Practices in Secondary Schools 2 

Ed. 251. Production of Audio-visual Resources 2 

Ed. 258. Education for Special Groups 2 

Ed. 284. Pupil-personnel Administration 2 

Ed. 322. Organizing Programs of Audio-visual Education 2 

Ed. 326. Practice in Supervision of Elementary-school Instruction 2 

Ed. 327. Demonstration and Practice in Supervision of Secondary-school 

Instruction 2-3 

Ed. 336. The Secondary-school Curriculum 2 

Ed. 341. School Buildings and Equipment 2 

Ed. 360. Problem in Education 3 

Ed. 395-8. Practicum 3 

E.M. 351. Coal Mining 3 

Practical or Skilled 10 Hr. 

Ag. Mech. 252. Advanced Farm Mechanics 2 

Ag. Mech. 253. Advanced Farm Machinery 3 

Ag. Mech. 259. Functional Requirements of Farm Buildings 3 

Ag. Mech. 270. Electricitv in Agriculture 3 

Ch. E. 260. Ceramics . . '. 3-6 

Ed. 204. Advanced Woodworking 3 

Ed. 206. Industrial Experience 2-6 

Ed. 207. Maintenance of Equipment in Industrial Arts 2 

Ed. 208. Wood Finishing 2 

Ed. 240-250. Advanced Crafts 2-10 

Ed. 320, 321. Special Topics in Industrial Arts 2-6 

Free electives 0-6 Hr. 

Total for Master's Degree 30-36 Hr. 



T HE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 231 



CURRICULUM FOR GENERAL SUPERVISORS 

Degree: Master of Arts 

I. General Requirements 9 Hr. 

Ed. 347. Supervision of Instruction 3 

Ed. 348. Human Development and Behavior 3 

Ed. 349. Evaluation and Research in Supervision 3 

II. Practice or Laboratory Requirements 8 Hr. 

Ed. 380. Practice in Supervision (1st sem. in field) 2 

Ed. 381. Practice in Supervision (2nd sem. in field) 2 

Ed. 382. Practice in Supervision (3rd sem. in field) 2 

Ed. 383. Practice in Supervision (4th sem. in field) 2 

III. Requirements in Problems of Teaching (elect three) 9 Hr. 

Ed. 366. Teaching the Language Arts 3 

Ed. 367. Teaching the Social Studies 3 

Ed. 368. Teaching Extra-core Subjects 3 

Ed. 369. Teaching of Mathematics and Science 3 

IV. Electives (must be outside field of Education) 10 Hr. 

Recommended Electives 
Art 220 

English 228, 221 (Com.), 220 (Com.) 
Psychology 205, 218, 222, 224, 225 
Sociology 211, 244 
Speech 233, 250, 275 

Physical Education and Athletics 209, 378 
Health Education 203 
Political Science 200, 231 

NOTE: This curriculum can be pursued only after arrangement with Miss 
Scott. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF EDUCATION 

Admission to the Graduate School and enrollment in graduate courses do not of 
themselves imply acceptance of the applicant for a Doctor of Education Degree. The 
sequence of prerequisites to admission, prerequisites to candidacy, and requirements 
for the degree are as follows: 

Prerequisites to Admission 

Applicants expressing a desire to pursue a program leading to the Doctor of 
Education Degree are required lo satisfy a College of Education fatuity committee 
on prerequisites in the following ways: 

A. Furnish evidence of significant and appropriate teaching experience. 

B. Demonstrate the ability to read comprehendingly and to use creditable oral 
and written English. 

C. Demonstrate the ability to use the basic statistical processes. 

D. Furnish evidence of wide reading in general and professional fields. 

E. Show by means of oral and written tests a preparedness to undertake an 
organized program of advanced graduate study and research. 

F. In addition to the foregoing, the Committee on Prerequisites may require 
a trial period of resident study. 

Doctoral Committee 

When an applicant has received the permission of the Graduate School to enter 
upon an organized program of advanced graduate study and research he will be 
assigned an adviser by the Dean of the Graduate School. The Dean of the Graduate 



232 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



School and the adviser will jointly select a doctoral committee consisting of not 
fewer than five members of whom at least one shall be from a field other than 
Education. The adviser shall serve as chairman of the doctoral committee and this 
committee shall have charge and direction of the applicant's program. This program, 
prepared by the adviser and the applicant, must be approved by the doctoral com- 
mittee and by the Dean of the Graduate School before the applicant is eligible to 
stand for the qualifying examinations. 

Qualifying Examinations 

At a time to be determined by the doctoral committee after the applicant has 
spent at least one semester, or three summer terms of six weeks each, in full-time 
graduate work in on-campus residence beyond the Master's Degree or its equivalent, 
he will be admitted to written and oral comprehensive preliminary or qualifying 
examinations, conducted by the doctoral committee, in the areas of general professional 
background, specialization, and cognates. The applicant must (a) evidence a grasp 
of the important phases and problems of the field of study in which he proposes 
to major and the application of their relation to other fields of human knowledge 
and accomplishment; (b) demonstrate the ability to employ rationally the appropriate 
instruments of research; and (c) present a written tentative outline of a proposed 
research project. 

The written qualifying examination precedes the oral that should follow within 
a reasonable time the successful completion of the written. If the committee is not 
satisfied with the applicant's showing, it will make specific recommendations for 
additional work in preparation for a second trial that may be undertaken not earlier 
than six months nor later than twelve months after the first trial. The outcome of 
the second attempt will be considered final. 

When an applicant has passed the qualifying examinations he will formally be 
promoted to candidacy for the Doctor of Education Degree. Admission to candidacy 
must precede the final examination by at least one academic year in time and 12 
semester hours in credit. A maximum of 30 semester hours of graduate work pursued 
in fulfillment of the requirements for the Master's Degree, if of suitable character 
and quality, may be credited toward the doctorate. 

Requirements for Completion 

Curriculum. The degree of Doctor of Education is not achieved by the mere 
accumulation of course credits nor the completion of a definite residence requirement. 
The exact amount and nature of course work to be undertaken by a candidate will 
be determined in the light of his previous preparation and the demands of his 
chosen field of application. The aggregate of courses of graduate study shall, how- 
ever, be not fewer than 70 semester hours, exclusive of the dissertation. Not more 
than 12 of the 70 hours may be earned in extension and/or practicum or field work. 
The program of course work shall include a minimum of 42 semester hours in 
Education, at least 30 of which shall be on the "300" level, and a minimum of 24 
semester hours in cognate courses, of which at least 12 shall be on the "300" level. 
These courses shall be so ordered and distributed as to promote broad and systematic 
knowledge and the ability to prosecute independent research. 

Candidates having an earlier graduate degree or its equivalent from West Virginia 
University will be required to complete a prescribed minimum of resident graduate 
work in one or more other institutions. 

Residence. In general, requirements for the Doctor of Education Degree con- 
template three years of full-time graduate work beyond the Bachelor's Degree, 
including a minimum of two semesters in residence in full-time graduate study in 
West Virginia University beyond the Master's Degree or its equivalent. 

Special Requirements. Competence in the advanced techniques of statistical re- 
search; evidence of a functioning command of appropriate methods of educational 
investigation; and mastery of the rules of manuscript preparation. 

Dissertation. The candidate must submit a dissertation pursued under the 
direction of his doctoral committee on a problem in the field of his major interest. 
The dissertation must show familiarity with previous knowledge of the general 
problem; embody a clear definition of the particular problem pursued; employ valid 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 233 



methods of attack; demonstrate the ability to create and evaluate new knowledge; 
present and interpret unequivocally the results of the candidate's individual investi- 
gation; and disclose his ability to apply his contribution to the solution of educa- 
tional problems. 

Final Examination. If the candidate's dissertation is approved and he has 
fulfilled all other requirements, he will be admitted to final oral examination before 
his doctoral committee. At the option of his committee a written examination also 
may be required. The final examination or examinations shall be concerned with the 
dissertation, its contribution to knowledge, and the candidate's grasp of his field of 
specialization and its relation to other fields. No candidate may proceed to his final 
examination until he has fulfilled residence requirements for the degree and until 
he has completed at least 12 semester hours of graduate study subsequent to his 
admission to candidacy. 

Time Limitation. Requirements for the Doctor of Education Degree must be 
completed within seven years of admission to candidacy. 

NOTE: It is the responsibility of all applicants for admission to the Graduate 
School and all cand'dates for graduate degrees to conform to the General 
Regulations as published in the latest Announcements of the Graduate School. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



No courses in Education except Ed. 105 and 106 are open to sophomores. The 
following courses are required of teachers for recommendation for a first-class high 
school certificate: Ed. 105, 106, 114, 120, 124, 150-170 and enough additional hours 
chosen from the following approved electives to meet the minimum requirement of 
20 hours in Education: Ed. 109, 136, 150-170 in a second teaching field, 197, 
203, 212, 221, 222, 231, 233, 259, 262 or 266, 276 or 277, 281, 282, 284, 285, 291. 

Undergraduate Division 

101. Introduction' to Vocational Teaching. II. 2 hr. A survey of the field of 
vocational education with particular emphasis on orientation as the foundation 
for occupational preparation. Mr. Allen 

102. Hand Woodworking. I. 3 hr. Basic for prospective industrial-arts teachers. Use 
of most hand tools found in school shops, development of school-shop projects, 
and basic finishing information. Mr. Brennan 

103. Machine Woodworking. II. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 102. Use of common pieces of power 
woodworking equipment and safety factors involved in their use in school 
shops. I -— -p Mr. Brennan 

104. Basic Handwork with Bench Tools ron Metae? I, S. / hi. PR for all advanced 
work in metal craft. Staff 

105. Educational Psychology— Human Growth and Development. I, II, S. 3 hr. 
Open to sophomores or above. Three hours of class and one hour of conference 
a week. Special emphasis is placed upon developing competencies on the part 
of prospective teachers in understanding and applying principles involved in 
the growth and development of children and youth. Miss Fulton 

106. Educational Psychology— The School Program and Pupil Development. I, II, 
S. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 105. Continuation of Ed. 105 with special attention to the 
nature of the school program as it affects the growth and development of 
pupils. Open to sophomores or above. Mr. Fish and Mr. Wheat 



107. 



General Shop Practice. II, S. ^-hr. Diversified experience with tools of all 
crafts contributing to the completion of shop projects in industrial arts. 

Mr. Auk 



234 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



109. Secondary Education. I, II, S. 3 hr. Introduction to secondary-school teachers' 

problems or organization and administration not including instructional matters. 

// Mr. Schultz and Mr. Williams 

114. Educational Psychology— Adolescent Adjustment. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 105 
and 106. Types of learning activities featured in the program of the secondary 
school and the forms of personal and social adjustment effected, with special 
consideration given to methods and techniques applicable to the evaluation of 
pupil progress. Mr. Baldwin, Miss Fulton, and Mr. Jarecke 

115. Student Teaching in Elementary-School Music. I, II. 2 hr. Observation and 
practice of teaching music to pupils in grades one to six in the University Lab- 
oratory Elementary School. Open to seniors who have completed 27 hours in 
Music and 7 semester hours in Education with 2 grade points average in each 
and a general grade-point average of "C." Opportunity for observation and 
practice is limited to one class period (one hour) each day each semester for 
4 students. Attendance is required on alternate days, when instruction in Music 
is given, in each of the two classrooms of the Laboratory Elementary School. 

Miss Wasmuth and Mr. Brown 

120. Principles of Teaching in Secondary Schools- I, II, S. 2 hr. Open only to 

those who qualify for the student teaching block. Mr. Cook 

124. Student Teaching. I, II, S. 4 hr. PR: Ed. 105, 106, and one elective in Educa- 
tion. (Ed. 114 is not an elective). This course is open only to seniors and 
graduate students regularly enrolled in the University meeting the following 
requirements: 

1. Completion of approximately 75 per cent of the hours required in each 
of two teaching fields and completion of Ed. 105, 106, and one elective course 
in Education, with a minimum general grade-point average of "C" and a mini- 
mum average of "C" in each teaching field and in Education. 

2. An applicant for student teaching must submit positive evidence that 
he (or she) meets the requirements of physical conditions and emotional 
stability necessary for the performance of the duties of a teacher in the public 
schools. Such evidence must come from the University Health Center on a 
blank provided by the College of Education. 

3. This course must be taken simultaneously with Ed. 120 and the appro- 
priate course of Ed. 150-170 unless exceptions have previously been made with 
Mr. Cook. A period of 3 hours daily must be reserved for this and simultaneous 
courses for purposes of observation, for subsequent discussion, for individual 
students, and for subsequent planning. 

4. All students must reserve Monday, 7 to 9 p.m., biweekly, for teachers' 
meetings. 

5. Because two-thirds of the program of the University High School is in the 
forenoon, two-thirds of the applicants must schedule this course in the morning, 
reserving three hours daily without interruption. 

6. Admission is by application made early in the preceding semester to Prof. 
Kermit A. Cook, who alone will give permission to enroll when requirements 
are met. 

7. Tlie adviser is responsible for furnishing a check of the student's record 
to determine eligibility. 

Mr. Cook, Mr. Miller, Mr. Butler or Mr. Hill, and U.H.S. Staff 

130. Materials and Methods in Elementary-school Music. I, II. 2 hr. (To be 
carried simultaneously with Education 115.) Miss Wasmuth and Mr. Brown 

136. High-school Program of Studies. I, II. 3 hr. Principles governing the selecting 
of subjects and subject matter for secondary schools, with special emphasis on 
possibilities within given subjects. Mr. Hudelson 

141. Psychology and Management of the Elementary School. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 
105, 106, and enrollment in College of Education undergraduate program in 
elementary education. Types of learning activities of the elementary school, 



142 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 235 

forms of personal and social adjustment effected, evaluation of progress of 
pupils, with special attention to the organization of the daily program of the 
school and the management of classroom activities. 

Mr. Wheat, Mr. Feaster, and Mr. Fish 
-Materials and Methods in the Basic Arts. I, II. 5 hr. PR: Ed. 105, 106, and 
enrollment in the College of Education undergraduate program in elementary 
education. The methods and materials of learning and instruction in reading, 
writing, language, music, art, arithmetic. Mr. Wheat Mr. Feaster, and Mr. Fish 

44& — Maieria ls and Methods in the Content Subjects. I, II. 5 hr. PR: Ed. 105, 
106, and enrollment in the College of Education undergraduate program in 
elementary education. The methods and materials of learning and instruction 
in reading, writing, language, music, art, arithmetic. 

Mr. Wheat, Mr. Feaster, and Mr. Fish 

144. Directed Teaching in Elementary School. I, II. 5 hr. PR: Ed. 141 and 142 
or 143; open to students in the program of elementary education with senior 
standing who have gained a minimum grade average of "C" (1) in non- 
Education courses, and (2) in Education courses. To remain in the course, 
students must maintain the minimum grade average of "C." They will 
arrange in advance with their adviser a schedule which permits a half day 
each day of uninterrupted work in this course, and which does not exceed a 

maximum of 16 semester hours in total. Mr. Wheat, Mr. Feaster, and Mr. Fish 

■ - n 1 — ■ — 4 r 

150-170. Materials and Methods of High-school Teaching. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: Con- 
sent of instructor. Special methods in the various secondary-school teaching 
fields. For West Virginia certification these courses are an integral part of Ed. 
124. May also be chosen as a two-hour elective by students who are registered 
for student teaching in other fields. 
The various sections of this course, with their instructors, follow: 

150. Biology. 2 hr. Mr. Hathawav 

151. Science. 2 hr. Staff 

152. Physical Education. 2 hr. Mr. Eicher, Mr. Fizer, and Mrs. Hayhurst 
155. Library Science. 2 hr. Miss Robinson 

160. Agriculture. 3 hr. Mr. Bible, Mr. Hill, and Mr. Butler 

161. English. 2 hr. Miss Brochick, Mr. Full, Miss Smrek, and Miss Woofter 

163. Home Economics. 2 hr. Mrs. Roberts 

164. Industrial Arts. 2 hr. Mr. Ault 

165. Mathematics. 2 hr. Miss Wilt, Mrs. Dorsey 

166. Physical Science. 2 hr. Mr. Federer 

167. Social Science. 2 hr. Mrs. Semon 

168. Art. 2 hr. Mrs. Roller 

169. Music. 2 hr. Mr. Thomas and Miss Wasmuth 

170. Commerce. 2 hr. Miss Watson 

179. Safety Education— Safe Driving. S. 1 hr. Open to selected high-school teach- 
ers. Mr. Eicher 

180. Safety Education— Safe Driving. S. 1 hr. Open to selected high-school teach- 
ers. Continuation of Ed. 179. Mr. Eicher 

197. Survey of Vocational Education. I. 2 hr. The relationship to the public- 
school program and to each other of vocational agriculture, vocational home 
economics, trade and industrial education, commercial education, distribu- 
tive education, rehabilitation, and re-education. Mr. Allen 



/ 






236 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



. 



- 



*203. Organization and Administration of Adult Education. II. 2 hr. Mr. Allen 

204. Advanced Woodworking, Construction, and Finishing. II, S. 3 hr. PR: Ele- 
mentary woodworking. Selection of advanced projects, analyzing construction 
planning and finishing, application of machine tools. Mr. Brennan 

206. Industrial Experience. I, II, S. 2-6 hr. Open onlv to students qualifying to 
teach industrial arts or become counselors. Evaluation of educative outcome 
of personal employment in industry as determined bv duration, experience, 
records, studv on job, and final examination. Counts as extension credit. 

Mr. Allen 

207. Maixtehaojoe o r Fy T' Tr-r m T nnu rTnirti flim Su rr- I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: 
Consent of instructor. Mr. Brennan and Mr. Ault 

208. Wood Finishing. I, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 103 and Ed. 204. Practice and theory in 
the art of sanding, scraping, filling, dyeing, staining, waxing, and other natural 
and synthetic treatments to the surface of wooden articles such as constructed 
in the industrial arts shop. Mr. Brennan and Staff 

212. High-school Tests and Measures. I, II. 3 hr. Uses and techniques of educa- 
tional measurement in secondarv-school teaching. Miss Fulton and Mr. Hudelson 

IT *■ s PL ' %^ 

221. Audio-visual Resources for Instruction. I, II, S. 2 hr. Uses of sensory techniques \ ji 

in teaching. One-hour laboratory period per week required. Restricted to 
seniors and graduates. Mr. Allen and Mr. Williams 

222. Current Practices in Secondary Education. I, II, S. 2 hr. Mr. Schultz 

224. Advanced Student Teaching. I. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Education 124 or its equivalent 
and permission of the Director of Student Teaching. If in the same teaching 
field as Education 124, must involve types of experiences not generally available 
in beginning student teaching. Mr. Cook, Mr. Miller and U.H.S. Staff 

231. Philosophy of Education. I, S.^hr. PR: Five hours of Education courses and 
senior standing. Evaluation of educational theories and practices in terms 
of the several judgments of ultimate worth set up by man in his endeavor 
to understand life's real meaning. Mr. Baldwin 

233. Educational Sociology. II, S. 3 hr. PR: Five hours of Education courses and 
senior standing. Impacts of institutions of society upon school, and school's 
counter-impacts upon social institutions and agencies. 

Mr. Baldwin and Mr. Williams 
Education 240-250. These courses are designed to prepare versatile teachers of indus- 
trial arts and to meet state certification requirements. The abbreviated intro- 
duction to specific crafts through these courses is intended to provide broad 
rather than specialized experience and to prepare the teacher to teach the 
fundamentals of crafts rather than to attain vocational competence. Prospective 
teachers should elect from these courses those which will supplement their 
previous training in organizing and directing the industrial arts program. 
Education 250 is particularlv designed for elementary teachers whose work 
includes teaching manual arts in the elementary school. 



Metal Working. I, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 104. Design and construction of projects 
using sheet, bar, wire, and castings in iron, steel, copper, brass, aluminum, and 



240. 

alloys. Staff 

241. Jewelry. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 104. Design and construction of projects in 
costume jewelry made from gold-filled and silver wire and sheets; installing 
jewels; gold and silver soldering; tool design and tool making for special 
operations. Staff 

*To receive graduate credit for any courses numbered 200-299, the student 
must have had at least 14 hours in undergraduate Education. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 237 



243. 



246 



242. Upholstering. S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 103. Original and renewal installation of 
selected materials for springing, stuffing, and covering furniture; incidental re- 
inforcement and repairs. Each student will need to purchase a simple kit 
of tools. Staff 

Pottery. S. 2 hr. Selection, preparation, and manipulation of materials for 
projects in clay, including modeling, coil and slab building, throwing with 
hand and power wheels, glazing and firing. Mr. Brennan 

244. Leather Crafts. I, S. 2 hr. Selection of materials; design and construction of 
projects in leather, tooling, carving, lacing, staining, etc. Mr. Brennan 

245. Plastics. II, S. 2 hr. Manipulation of selected plastics in block, sheet, tube and 
rod. Forming to shape, fabrication, and carving. Projects to incorporate these 
processes will be undertaken by members of the class. Mr. Brennan 

Phwn-swg. S. 2 hr. Preparing of format, setting type, proofing, operating press, 
trimming, and assembling. Mr. Brennan 

247. Auto Mechanics. S. 2 hr. Practice and theory in operation and maintenance of 
automotive equipment, including repair operations feasible for the car owner. 

Staff 

248. Applied Electricity. II, S. 2 hr. Practice of installation, adjustment and minor 
repairs of electric units of the sort found in the modern home and shop. 

Mr. Brennan 

249. Sheet Metal. S. 2 hr. Designing, making patterns, and construction of sheet 
metal objects useful about the modern home and feasible for home shop con- 
struction. Cutting, bending, forming, spinning, soldering and similar opera- 
tions. Mr. Brennan 

250. Diver sified Crafts. I, II, S. 2 hr. Selected units of activity in leather work, 
plastics, metal foil, elemental pottery, and graphics. Observation and partici- 
pation. Mr. Ault and Mr. Brennan 

251. Production of Audio-visual Resources. S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 221. Practical partici- 
pation in planning and producing audio-visual media for use in teaching, for 
supporting the school's public-relations program, and in educational research. 

Mr. Allen and Mr. Williams 

258. Education for Special Groups. I, II, S. 2 hr. A study of the techniques and 
organization of instruction of adults and teen-age youth not in attendance at 
ordinary day-school classes. Part-time, evening, and dull-season classes are 
among the educational projects considered. Mr. Allen 

259. Special Problems in Music Education. II, S. 2 hr. PR or parallel: Ed. 124 in 
Music or consent of instructor. Study and analysis of various types of music 
positions; school-community music program, public performance, contests, fes- 
tivals; music in school assembly, listening, creative activities. Mr. Brown 

262- Vocational Home Economics in Secondary Schools. I, II. 3 hr. PR or parallel: 
Ed. 120, 124, and 163; home economics, 25 hours. Primarily for seniors and 
teachers of home economics. Miss Noer 

266. Adult Education in Homemaking. I, II. 2 hr. Current trends and present activi- 
tives in the field of adult education. Organization of adult classes, development 
of unit outlines; consideration of teaching methods; illustrative material and 
bibliography for use in adult classes. Staff 

270. Special Problems and Workshops. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: 14 hr. Education. To take 
care of credits for special workshops and classes held occasionally on problems 
of Education dealing with measurement, guidance, administration, methods, 
supervision, and the like. Staff 

276. Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Classes. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 105 and 106. 
Participation in conducting young and adult farmer classes and school-corn- 



238 CURRICULA AND COURSES 









munity food preservation center; organization, course of study, methods of 
teaching and supervision, and young farmer association. Mr. Hill and Mr. Butler 

277. Organizing and Directing Supervised Farming Programs. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 
160 or consent. Planning programs of supervised farming, supervising and 
evaluating such programs for all-day students, young farmers and adult farm- 
ers. Mr. Hill and Mr. Butler 

_ 9 7 tt - Planning Programs and Courses for Vocational Agriculture Departments. 
I, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 124. Gathering data, studying the farming problems of 
all-day students, young farmers, and adult farmers, and planning the total 
program for the department. Mr. Hill and Mr. Butler 

281. History of Elementary and Secondary Education in the United States. I, II, 
S. 3 hr. Mr. Cook 

282. Development of Modern Education. I, II, S. 2 hr. Comparative study of 
schools in the leading nations of Europe since 1800. Mr. Schultz 

283. History of Education in West Virginia. II, S. 2 hr. A study of the growth 
of elementary, secondary, and higher education in the state with special 
emphasis given to movements and influences which brought about significant 
changes in organizational, financial, and instructional policies and practices. 

Mr. Cook 

284. Pupil-personnel Administration. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 105 and 106. Pupil 
accounting, guidance, extra-curricular activities, and control. Open only to 
seniors and graduates. Mr. Schultz 

285. The Junior High School. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 105 and 106 and consent of 
instructor. Open only to seniors and graduates. Mr. Hudelson 

291. Exploratory Reading. S. 2 hr. PR: Consent of instructor. For those who feel 
need for wider acquaintance with books. Staff 

294. Organization of Industrial Arts. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Consent of instructor. An 
advanced course. Preparation of comprehensive programs of industrial arts at 
all scholastic levels. Mr. Brennan and Mr. Ault 

Graduate Division 

i N L ■■ 

304. Remedial Techniques in Elementary-school Subjects. S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 308 
and 309 or consent of instructor. Methods and materials useful in aiding re- 
tarded and failing pupils. Mr. Fish 

305. County Educational Clinic. S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 308 and 309 or consent of 
instructor. Procedures of providing and managing clinical services needed in 
larger school areas. Staff 

306. Geography in the Elementary School. S. 2 hr. PR: 10 hours undergraduate 
credit in elementary education or consent of instructor. Methods of directing 
teachers in organizing content of geography for pupils. Staff 

307. Health and Science in the Elementary School. II, S. 2 hr. PR: 10 hours of 
undergraduate credit in elementary education. Materials and methods of 
science with special consideration of human health and safety. Mr. Fish 

308. The Psychology of Arithmetic. I, S. 2 hr. PR: 10 hours of undergraduate 
credit in elementary education or consent of instructor. Processes of number 
thinking and sequential steps of their development among pupils. 

Mr. Wheat 

309. The Psychology of Reading. II, S. 2 hr. 10 hours of undergraduate credit in 
elementary education or consent of instructor. Progress through grades in 
art of reading; direction of attention required at different stages. Mr. Feaster 



THE COLLEGE OE EDUCATION 239 



316. Psychology of Elementary-school Subjects. S. 2 hr. PR: 10 hours of under- 
graduate credit in elementary education or consent of instructor. Distinguish- 
ing features of various subjects, types of learning activity they require, and 
sequences characteristic of each. Mr. Wheat 

320, 321. Special Topics in Industrial Arts. I, II, S. 2-3 hr. each. Consent of in- 
structor. For graduate students in industrial arts. Special projects of im- 
provement in phases needing special attention. 

Mr. Allen, Mr. Ault, and Mr. Brennan 

322. Organizing Programs of Audio-Visual Instructions. S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 221. 
An advanced course dealing with problems of planning extensive programs of 
using movie, talkie, radio, slides, charts, exhibits, etc., for instructional pur- 
poses. Mr. Allen and Mr. Williams 

326. Practice in Supervision of Elementary-school Instruction. S. 2 hr. PR: 6 
graduate hours of elementary education or consent of instructor. Observing 
and practicing major activities of supervisor in work with pupils and teachers. 
To be taken late in student's candidacy. Mr. Wheat and Mr. Davis 

327. Demonstration and Practice in the Supervision of Secondary-school In- 
struction. II, S. 2-3 hr. PR: Consent of instructor. Opportunity to observe 
approved processes in classroom supervision and to practice, under guidance, 
art of improving classroom instruction. To be taken late in student's candi- 
dacy. Mr. Cook 

335. The Elementary-school Curriculum. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: 10 hours of under- 
graduate credit in elementary education or consent of instructor. Organization 
of content and materials of instruction of subjects through the grades. 

Mr. Fish 

336. The Secondary-school Curriculum. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: High-school teaching 
experience or consent of instructor. Principles of and practice in curriculum 
construction for modern high schools. Mr. Schultz 

339. Public-School Organization and Administration. I, S. 2 hr. PR: 20 hours of 
Education and consent of instructor. An orientation course for present and 
prospective school administrators, with emphasis upon the problems which 
grow out of the county unit. Required as a basic course of all who specialize 
in educational administration. Mr. Baldwin 

340. Public-School Finance. S. 2 hr. PR or Cone: Ed. 339 and consent of in- 
structor. Sources of school support; taxation; efficient management of school 
money; locally by improved budgetary practices; in state by more adequate 
apportionment plans. To be taken late in student's candidacy. 

Mr. Baldwin 

341. School Buildings and Equipment. I, S. 2 hr. PR or Cone: Ed. 339 and con- 
sent of instructor. Philosophy, planning, and management of school plant as 
appropriate physical environment — the home of pupils for effective learning. 

Mr. Baldwin 

343. School Surveys. 2 hr. PR or parallel: Ed. 339 and consent of instructor. Devel- 
opment of the educational survey as an instrument for improving educational 
procedures. Mr. Baldwin 

344. Staff-Personnel Administration. 2 hr. PR or Parallel: Ed. 339 and consent of 
instructor. Selection, induction, direction, evaluation, improvement, and pro- 
motion of members of the supervisory, instructional, research, clerical, and 
maintenance staffs. . Mr. Baldwin 

346. Principles of Supervision. I, S. 2 hr. Basic; general principles of elementary- 
school, junior high-school, and senior high-school supervision. 

Mr. Cook and Miss Scott 

347. Supervision of Instruction. 3 hr. Open only to persons who have had admin- 
istrative or supervisory experience. A study of principles of supervision and of 



/ 



240 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



techniques to be employed in the development of supervisory programs, grades 
1-12. This course may be substituted for Education 346 if approved by the 
adviser. Miss Scott 

348. Human Development and Behavior. S. 3 hr. A study of the inter-relationship 
of physical and environmental factors as they affect the behavior of children 
and youth. Miss Scott 

349. Evaluation and Research in Supervision. S. 3 hr. Open only to persons who 
have had administrative or supervisory experience. A study of educational 
research pertinent to the problems of supervision and of methods and tech- 
niques to be employed in the organization of a research project. Miss Scott 

350. Science of Teaching. S. 2 hr. PR: consent. Mr. Hudelson 

353. The Secondary-school Principal. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 339, high school teach- 
ing experience, or consent of instructor. Open only to graduate students in 
Education late in their candidacy. Practicum in secondary-school administra- 
tion. Mr. Hudelson 

356. The Elementary-school Principal. S. 2 hr. PR: 6 graduate hours of ele- 
mentary education or consent of instructor. Work of principal in manage- 
ment and supervision of school. To be taken late in candidacy. 

Mr. Wheat and Mr. Feaster 

357. Organization and Administration of Vocational Education. S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 
339. Specific consideration of the development of practical training in agri- 
culture, home economics, industry, and commerce with particular reference to 
their place in the public school system. Mr. Allen 

360. Problem in Education. I, II, S. 3 hr. One of the alternative requirements for 
the Master's Degree in Education. (See Thesis or Option) . Staff 

362. Thesis in Education. I, II, S. 1-6, maximum, total 6 hr. One of the alter- 
native requirements for the Master's Degree in Education. (See Thesis or 
Option). Staff 

364. Advanced Methods in Teaching Industrial Arts. I, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 294. 
Current developments and research in field. Mr. Brennan and Mr. Ault 

366. Teaching the Language Arts. S. 3 hr. PR: Consent of instructor. Methods in 
development of language arts of reading, writing, spelling through grades 
one to twelve. Staff 

367. Teaching the Social Studies in Elementary and Secondary Schools. I, S. 
3 hr. PR: Consent of instructor. Methods in teaching and course develop- 
ment of social studies through all school grades. Mr. Cook 

368. The Teaching of Extra Core Subjects. S. 3 hr. PR: Consent of instructor. 
A consideration of problems arising in grades 1 to 12 in teaching art. music, 
physical education, and club activities. Staff 

369. The Teaching of Mathematics and Science. S. 3 hr. PR: Consent of in- 
structor. A consideration of ways in which teachers may be helpful in teach- 
ing methods of exact thinking, grades 1 to 12. Staff 

372. Statistical Methods in Education. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: 20 hours of Education. 

Mr. Hudelson 

373. Basic Course in Principles and Practices of Guidance. II, S. 3 hr. An over- 
view of a total guidance program. Mr. Allen and Mr. Jarecke 

374. Counseling Techniques. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 373, 375, 376. Study of and 
practice in techniques of counseling. Mr. Jarecke 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 241 



375. Individual Inventory Techniques. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 373. Comprehensive 
study of all objective measures used in schools; techniques of administration, 
interpretation and recording results. Mi. Jarecke and Miss Fulton 

37fr. Occupational Information Techniques. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 373. Methods 
of gathering and disseminating occupational and educational information. 

Mr. Jarecke 

377. Special Counseling Problems. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 373, 374, 375, 376. Work 
with actual problem cases according to clinical procedures. Cases to be pur- 
sued to satisfactory conclusion. Mr. Jarecke 

378. Advanced Studies of Human Adjustment. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 373, 374, 375, 
376. Analytical consideration of identification, causes and development of 
psychological maladjustments, further study of developments in counseling and 
background in advance studies in guidance. Mr. Allen and Mr. Jarecke 

379. Organization and Administration of Guidance Services. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 
373, 374, 375, 376. Operative framework of guidance programs in terms of 
personnel, functions, relationships, physical facilities, institutional integration, 
finance, standards, laws, and regulations. Mr. Allen and Mrs. Jarecke 

380. 381, 382, 383. Practice in Supervision. I, II. Credit 2 hr. each. PR: Assignment 

to actual full-time work in supervision in a school system, previous certifica- 
tion, and consent of instructor. Each course a continuation of preceding. 
To complete the entire 8 hours not less than two full years of field experience 
under control of Director of Supervisor Training will be accepted. 

Miss Scott 

390. Advanced Course for the Teaching of English. S. 2 hr. PR: Consent of 

instructor. Mr. Hudelson 

392. Materials for General Reading. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 291. Study of materials for 
secondary schools and for adult classes. 

395, 396, 397, 398. Practicum. Special individual and group projects. I, II, S. 
1-4 hr. per semester or term — aggregating not over 12 hr. PR: 8 graduate 
hours in Education. Enrollment with permission of adviser and instructors in 
consultation. To provide appropriate credits for special workshops, prolonged 
systematic conferences on problems and projects in Education. Credits in 
these projects cannot be substituted for required courses and must be done 
in residence. 

Agricultural Education. Mr. Butler and Mr. Hill 

Audio-visual Education. Mr. Allen and Mr. Williams 

Educational Measurement and Evaluation. Mr. Hudelson, Mr. Jarecke, and Miss 

Fulton 
Educational Psychology. Miss Fulton, Mr. Jarecke, and Mr. Wheat 
Educational Sociology. Mr. Baldwin and Mr. Cook 
Elementary Education. Mr. Feaster, Mr. Fish, and Mr. Wheat 
Guidance. Mr. Allen, Miss Fulton, and Mr. Jarecke 
Home Economics Education. Miss Brown and Miss Noer 

Human Growth and Development. Miss Fulton, Mr. Jarecke, and Miss Scott 
Industrial Arts Education. Mr. Allen, Mr. Brennan. and Mr. Ault 
Music Education. Mr. Brown 
Philosophy of Education. Mr. Baldwin 
School Administration. Mr. Baldwin 

Secondary Education. Mr. Cook, Mr. Hudelson, and Mr. Schultz 
Special and Adult Education. Mr. Allen and Mr. Williams 
Supervision. Mr. Cook, Miss Scott, and Mr. Schultz 
Teaching of English. Mr. Hudelson 

Teaching of Mathematics. Mr. Feaster, Mr. Fish, and Mr. Wheat. 
Teaching of Science. Mr. Allen 
Teaching of Social Sciences. Mr. Cook 



242 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Vocational Education. Mr. Allen, Miss Brown, Mr. Hill, Miss Noer, and Mr. Butler 
Rural Education. Mr. Allen and Mr. Schultz 

399. Techniques of Educational Research. II. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 372 and consent of 
instructor. Application of research techniques to problems of modern education; 
analysis and implications of results.. Mr. Hudelson 

Ed. A, B,C, and D. Conference. No credit. For students in the program of element- 
ary education during their junior and senior years. 



The College of Engineering and 

Mechanic Arts; 

The School of Mines 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MECHANIC ARTS 
AND THE SCHOOL OF MINES 

For the purpose of administration and instruction, the College of Engineering 
and Mechanic Arts is organized into the following departments: 
Aeronautical Engineering (A. E.) Electrical Engineering (E. E.) 

Agricultural Engineering (Ag. E.) Mechanical Engineering (M. E.) 

Chemical Engineering (Ch. E.) Mechanics (M.) 

Civil Engineering (C. E.) 

All the mining and industrial extension work of the University is organized undei 
the School of Mines. For the purpose of administration the school is divided into 
the following divisions: 
Mining and Industrial Extension Mining Engineering (E. M.) 

The Engineering Experiment Station 
Professor W. A. Koehler, Director 

The chief functions of the Engineering Experiment Station are to encourage 
and carry on research and investigations that will enhance the industrial and 
economic welfare of the people of West Virginia; to make original contributions to the 
fundamental principles and knowledge along scientific and engineering lines; and 
to stimulate and train graduate students in research activities. The research 
undertaken by the Station therefore is primarily concerned with investigations in 
the production, processing, and utilization of the natural resources of West Virginia; 
investigations that will aid the existing industries of the state and promote the de- 
velopment of new industries; and investigations that will aid in the planning, design, 
and development of the public works of the state. As a consequence of this program, 
the subjects receiving particular attention by the staff of the Station are coal, oil, 
gas, clays, stone, sand, timber, water, steam and electric power, sewerage, sanitation, 
road building, transportation, aeronautics, and communications. 

The Station will assist in compiling surveys and in conducting investigations of 
the industrial requirements and possibilities of any region or community in the state. 
It cooperates with the West Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station, State Road 
Commission, State Geological Survey, State Department of Health, national engi- 
neering societies and state or national agencies whose assistance may promote the more 
effective fulfillment of the Station's functions. 

To aid state industrial organizations that lack facilities and personnel to under- 
take important research investigations which arise in the development of their oper- 
ations, the Station stands ready, where time and facilities permit, to assist in the prose- 
cution of investigations on their fundamental problems. Such advisory services are 
free, but any special equipment, materials, or labor that may be needed must be sup- 
plied by the organization for which the work is done. Several companies and tech- 
nological associations have sponsored research fellowships in the Station. 

243 



!44 CURRICULA AND COl'RSKS 



The staff of the Station includes part-time services of several of the teaching 
members of the faculties of the College of Engineering and of the School of Mines, 
as well as a few full-time research engineers and chemists and part-time graduate 
student research assistants. 

The results of the studies, surveys, investigations, and researches of the Experi- 
ment Station are published in bulletin form. Two series of bulletins are issued; to 
date there are 24 numbers in the Research Series and 30 in the Technical Series. 
The Technical Bulletins contain selected papers from the Proceedings of the Annual 
State Water Purification Conferences, the State Coal Conferences, the Appalachian 
Gas Measurement Short Courses, and the Industrial Engineering Conferences. A 
list of publications and copies of the bulletins mav be obtained upon application to 
the Director of the Engineering Experiment Station. 

Mining and Industrial Extension 

The department of mining and industrial extension in the School of Mines con- 
ducts courses of instruction in practical subjects in various sections of the state where 
groups of individuals wish to study and receive training in subjects pertaining to their 
everyday work. The department also aims to disseminate useful knowledge which 
has been amassed by research studies at the University to all classes of citizens in the 
state, and in this way to bring the University and its opportunities lor learning 10 
various groups of students who desire to enroll in its extension department. 

The Short Courses in Coal Mining, Coal Preparation, and Mine Equipment and 
Maintenance 

The Short Course in Coal Mining offered by the department of mining and 
industrial extension gives an opportunity to operators, officials, and emplovees of 
mining companies to obtain instruction pertaining to their work. The subjects cov- 
ered in the short course are: explosives, methods of mining, timbering, mine gases, 
mine ventilation, hoisting, haulage, mine drainage, safety lamps, mine management, 
electricity in mines, mine fires and explosions, safety organization and administration, 
mining arithmetic, and elementary drawing. 

Special attention is given to students desirous of preparing themselves for the 
teaching of mining classes under the Smith-Hughes and George-Dean Acts. 

At the close of the short course the West Virginia Department of Mines conducts 
an examination for mine foremen and fire bosses. Tuition is free. 

The Short Course in Coal Preparation is held principally for men who have been 
associated with the sizing and preparing of coal for market. 

The classroom portion of the course covers the purpose of coal preparation, 
breaking and crushing, screening, cleaning, analysis of float and sink tests and wash- 
ability curves, dewatering and drying, dedusting and dust collection, recovery of 
fines, auxiliary equipment, treatment of coal surfaces, loading, cost, power, water and 
labor, and analysis of flow sheets. 

In the laboratory, the equipment includes a sand media cone. Baum jig, calcium 
chloride washer, heavv media cone washer, concentrating tables, basket jigs, air clean- 
ing table with filter-type dust collectors, magnetic separator, centrifuges, and a com- 
plete closed circuit mineral flotation unit. These units are all self-contained pilot 
units with auxiliary equipment to permit complete test operation. 

A Short Course in Mine Equipment and Maintenance is being offered by t he 
department of mining and industrial extension to persons whose interest is in the 
maintenance of coal mining equipment. The subjects covered in this short course 
are: practical mechanics, equipment hydraulics, equipment electricity, shop mathe- 
matics, lubrication, freehand drawing, electricity and hydraulic measurements, electri- 
cal controls, underground mining equipment, substation and fan maintenance, pre- 
paration plant maintenance and maintenance reports and records. This short course 
covers a period of six weeks. 

The forty-first annual session of the Short Course in Coal Mining, the third an- 
nual session of the Short Course in Coal Preparation, and the first Short Course in 
Mine Equipment and Maintenance will begin Monday, June 1, and continue until 
Saturday, July 11, 1953. For further information, write for the special announcement 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 245 



of the Short Course in Coal Mining, Coal Preparation, and Mine Equipment and 
Maintenance. 

The Short Course in Gas Measurement 

The first Appalachian Gas Measurement Short Course was conducted in 1938 
by the University in cooperation with the Public Service Commission of West Virginia, 
the West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association, the American Gas Association, 
and public utilities and industries producing, selling, or consuming natural gas in 
large quantities in West Virginia and neighboring states. This course provides in- 
struction in the theory and practice of gas measurement and pressure regulation and 
is designed to be of interest to executives and officials of gas companies as well as to 
metermen. The course covers a period of three days and is usually held during the 
last week of August each year. 

Vocational Courses Offered in Extension 

Courses in foreman training and other special courses for those in industry are 
offered in centers where there is sufficient interest. The services of the Department 
are available for any city or town desiring to establish night schools and part-time 
schools. 

Extension courses in mining are offered under the direction of the University 
at various mining towns throughout the state. The instruction in these courses is 
carried on by University extension instructors who visit each center every week. At 
the present time the work is planned on a four-year basis to cover the following 
courses: mine gases, safety lamps, ventilation, timbering, explosives, haulage, preven- 
tion of mine accidents, mine waste, drainage and pumping, mine methods, foreman- 
ship, electricity, mine fires and explosions, and coal geology'. In each of these unit 
courses, particular emphasis is placed on safety features, state mining laws, and ap- 
plication of arithmetic to mining problems. 

In addition to the above, special classes are offered in such subjects as effective 
speaking, group discussion, mine equipment and maintenance, mine surveying, and 
other selected subjects for which there is local demand. 

Extension classes in industrial engineering subjects, process instrumentation and 
industrial psychology are presently being held at several points in t*he State. 

Fire Service Extension School 

An annual training school for firemen is conducted each year in cooperation 
with the State Fire Marshal, and the West Virginia Inspection Bureau. This school 
is conducted under the supervision of R. E. Hanna, Jr., Instructor in Fire Service 
Extension Schools. Extension courses in fire-department evolutions, fire protection, 
and fire prevention are offered under the direction of the University in cooperation 
with the Vocational Division of the State Department of Education, at various 
fire departments in West Virginia. The instruction in these courses is carried 
on by local extension instructors in the various departments. The classes meet 
once each week for approximately thirtv weeks and cover the following subjects: 
motor equipment, pumps, hose, ropes, ladders, rescue, attack and extinguishment, 
salvage, ventilation, gases, inspection, overhauling, and minor equipment. Approx- 
imately one-fifth of the time is spent on actual fire-department evolutions. 

Oil and Gas Extension Classes 

Extension classes for employees of the oil and gas industries are offered at various 
centers throughout the state by the Mining and Industrial Extension Department 
oi the School of Mines. The classes are organized in September of each year and 
meet once each week for a period of approximately eight months. The instruction 
is divided into five years' work as follows: First Year — mathematics, physics, and 
applied mechanics; Second Year — fluid mechanics, oil and gas transmission, and 
gas measurement; Third Year — meter testing, pressure regulation and compression; 
Fourth Year — principles of combustion and gas storage; Fifth Year — geology and 
production practices. 

Industrial Engineering Conference 

The Industrial Engineering Conference, sponsored by the College of Engineering 
and the Industrial Extension Department, School of Mines, is being held annually 



246 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



on the campus of West Virginia University. The conference is designed to promote 
the dissemination of information on industrial engineering principles and tech- 
niques, looking toward increase of efficiency and reduction of costs in industrial 
processes. Men, who are specialists in their respective fields in industrial engineer- 
ing, present papers and lead discussions in in problems relating to their field. These 
conferneces are held under the supervision of R. E. Shafer and R. E. Hanna. 

Buildings and Equipment 

Chemical engineering and mining engineering are housed in the Mineral Indus 
tries Building. Agricultural engineering is in the Forestry Building. Aeronautical, civil, 
electrical, and mechanical engineering are housed in Mechanical Hall. This building al- 
so contains the machine and welding shops, the steam-power laboratories and boiler 
room, the internal combustion engine laboratory, the materials testing laboratory, 
the electrical engineering laboratory, the hydraulic laboratory, the sanitary laboratory, 
and some of the general drafting rooms. Mechanical Hall also houses the offices and 
laboratories of the Materials Engineer of the State Road Commission. Mechanics and 
some of the drawing courses are given in the new Physics Building. 

In 1943-44 a modern brick and steel hangar, 80 by 120 feet, and a connecting 
building containing class room, office, shop, boiler room and pilot room were con- 
structed on University property adjacent to the Morgantown Municipal Airport. 

The University has two Cessna Model 140A airplanes, two Piper PA- 11 airplanes, 
and one Piper PA- 18 airplane which are used for flight training by University students. 
On the west side of the hangar is a concrete apron, 100 by 100 feet, which is con- 
nected to the Municipal Airport by a concrete taxi strip. 

A Cessna four place Model 170A airplane is used by the Aeronautical Engineer- 
ing Department for a course in Flight Testing and by the Civil Engineering Depart- 
ment for a course in Aerial Mapping. 

The Cessna airplanes are equipped with instruments for full panel and partial 
panel instrument flight instruction. A Link Instrument Trainer is used in conjunc- 
tion with these airplanes to supplement the instrument instruction. The airplanes 
are equipped with two-way radio equipment, both low and high frequency. In 
addition, one of the airplanes has a complete Omni-directional Range installation. 

In 1950 the Aerodynamics Laboratory Building was constructed. This structure 
houses a modern low-turbulence wind tunnel used for instruction and research. 
The tunnel, a single return type, has a test section area of 10 square feet. The 
wind tunnel has a flexible 125 h.p. power system that makes possible a range of 
airspeeds from zero to 200 miles per hour. The tunnel is adaptable for tests on 
model aircraft, full scale components, and tests of a thermodynamic nature. 

The Aerodynamics Laboratory Building has a 40 by 30 foot room on the west 
side with a 38-foot opening. The opening is connected to the hangar apron by a taxi 
strip. This room is used as a airplane shop and for testing purposes. 

In the drawing rooms of Mechanical Hall are collections of models of structures, 
mechanisms, charts, state and government maps, surveys, photographs, engineering 
specifications, drawings, tracings, and blue prints. In connection with the drawing 
rooms there are blue printing and photographic rooms equipped with electric appara- 
tus, photostat, and photographic outfits. 

The shops consist of a gas- and electric-welding shop and machine shop. Each 
workshop is equipped with suitable benches, measuring instruments, tools, shop ap- 
pliances, and machines, such as are ordinarily installed in the larger engineering col- 
leges and commercial shops. 

A variety of semi-automatic and automatic machines provides unusual opportun- 
ity for the student of modern production methods. 

The power-plant equipment consists of different types of steam and gas engines, 
direct-connected or belted to electric generators; a 100-kw. Westinghouse condensing 
steam turbine direct-connected to a direct-current generator; a 125-h.p. Skinner 
Universal unaflow steam engine direct-connected to a 240-volt three-phase alternator; a 
50-h.p. motor-generator set; a Babcock and Wilcox intregal furnace boiler, capacity 
7,000 lbs. of steam per hour fired with natural gas under conditions fully automatic 
modulating control. The boiler is equipped with an automatic boiler feed water 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 247 



regulator, flue gas temperature indicator, and Bailey steam flow meter. An inde- 
pendently gas-fired superheater equipped with temperature controller, pumps, con- 
densers, air compressors, steam traps, and other auxiliary apparatus provides the 
means of furnishing any desired kind of power. 

The mechanical and steam laboratories contain small steam and gas engines, 
two-stage air compressor, one water-cooled and one air-cooled, both equipped with 
electrical and mechanical controls, motor-driven tans, electric dynamometers, water 
brakes, Prony brakes, condensers, vacuum pumps, condensate pumps, steam calorim- 
eters, C0 2 analyzer, steam and gas-engine indicators, revolution counters, planimeters, 
anemometers, pressure gauges, thermometers, Venturi meters, orifices, Pitot tubes, and 
nozzles for measuring the flow of air and steam, etc. These are supplemented by the 
power plant equipment previously described, which affords facilities for steam- and 
gas-engine trials and boiler tests with larger units, and also provides facilities for 
various lines of experimental investigation. 

The internal-combustion laboratory contains a single-cylinder engine, a two 
cylinder two-stroke cycle engine, a four-cylinder engine, a four-cylinder opposed-pis- 
ton type engine, a six-cylinder and an eight-cylinder automotive gasoline engine, a 
large two-cvlinder gas engine, a Diesel tractor engine with electric dynamometer, a 
two-cylinder Diesel engine, water brakes, Prony brakes, generators, indicators, tach- 
ometers, planimeters, and other apparatus necessary for conducting performance tests 
on these engines. 

The Ordnance Department, U. S. Army, has selected the University for the estab- 
lishment of a sub-gage laboratory. This laboratory is housed in a specially con- 
structed air-conditioned room. It is equipped with the most modern types of high- 
precision gages and measuring instruments such as contour projectors, comparators, 
Pratt & Whitne) measuring machine, Sheffield multi-check, precision gage blocks, 
sine bars, sine blocks, surface plates, toolmaker's microscope, electro-limit gages, equip- 
ment for light-wave measurement, micrometers, height gages, etc. 

The electrical laboratory has motor-generator sets which supply controlled direct- 
current or alternating-current power to meet the special requirements of the labora- 
tory. These motor-generator sets supplement the power available from the Monon- 
gahela Power Company and the generators in the mechanical engineering laboratory. 

In addition to standard types of direct and alternating-current motors and 
generators, the electrical laboratory has special types of machines, such as a 
Fynn-Weichsel motor, a rotary converter, alternators ranging from 25 to 800 cycles, 
a G.E. amplidyne demonstration set for use in servomechanism, an electronic direct- 
reading frequency meter with a range from 1 to 50,000 cycles per second, a high- 
frequency demonstration oscillator rated at 1,000 watts, an electronic Mot-O-Trol, 
etc. There are also standard types of motor generators, rectifiers, storage batteries, 
reactances, capacitors, auto transformers, constant current transformers, and experi- 
mental apparatus for demonstrating many of the principles of electricity and 
magnetism. The equipment of the laboratory includes, besides the standard 
laboratory measuring instruments, tachometers, slipmeters, stroboscopes, frequency 
meters, illuminometers, oscillographs, rotating standards, a Fahy permeameter, a 
Silsbee current transformed testing set, laboratory precision standards, a potentiometer 
for the calibration of direct and alternating-current instruments, a full wave reversing 
Thy-mo-trol drive, an instrument comparitor, magnetic amplifier, and a harmonic 
generator. 

A relay demonstration board especially developed for college laboratories will be 
available in the near future. This board will demonstrate the complete protection of 
an electrical transmission line and associated equipment. 

In the communications and electronics laboratory there are various electronic 
devices such as communication receivers, television receivers, cathode ray oscilloscopes, 
vacuum-tube voltmeters, audio and radio frequency bridges, oscillators, signal generat- 
ors, square-wave generators, amplifiers, photoelectric relays, an ignitron and a metal 
tank rectifier, wave analyzer; also electronic testing devices such as tube-testers, multi- 
testers, an electronic switch, a chanalyst, and a dynamic demonstrator. An amateur 
radio station licensed as W8SPY is maintained normally by staff members for demon- 
strating the principles of radio communication. 



248 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



For use in ultra-high frequencies and associated work there are micro-wave 
generators, electric-wave guides, a wave standard, a Mega-Match, parabolic and other 
electric-w T ave reflectors, and micro-wave demonstration devices. 

Telephone equipment consisting of standard parts ,relays, etc. is supplemented 
with parts and assemblies for demonstrating essential features of various types of 
manual and dial telephone exchanges. An artificial telephone line is available for 
studies of phenomena associated with electric wave propagation and electric filters. 

The Materials Testing Laboratory is equipped with devices for testing cement, 
iron, steel, brick, stone, and other engineering materials. The principal machines 
are an Olsen testing machine of 400,000-pound capacity which can accommodate 
tension and compression specimens up to 6 feet, and beams up to 16 feet in length; 
two hydraulic Baldwin-Southwark universal testing machines of the latest type, one 
of 200,000-pound capacity, the other of 60,000-pound capacity with autographic 
recording attachment; a 10,000-pound Olsen transverse testing machine; a 10,000- 
inch-pound Riehle torsion machine with autographic recorder; and Brinell, Rock- 
well, Shore, Galileo and Yickers hardness testers. Morehouse proving rings for calibra- 
tion of testing machine are a part of the equipment of this laboratory. Photo-elastic 
and Stresscoat equipment has been provided for stress-analvsis, and complete electrical- 
resistance strain-gage apparatus is available both for class demonstration and for 
research purposes. 

The hydraulic laboratory pipe system is so connected that water mav be used 
either from the city pressure lines or from either of two centrifugal pumps— one 350 
g.p.m. and the other 600 g.p.m.— which take suction from three 4,000-gal. calibrated 
storage pits. Water is furnished to a weir tank where weirs of rectangular, triangular, 
or other shape may be tested; two orifice tanks where circular or square orifices and 
short tubes are tested under low heads; a 12-inch impulse wheel equipped with a glass 
paneled case and Prony brake for measuring the power developed; a Rotometer; 
a Eureka water meter; a Venturi meter; and two pipe lines designed for the 
study of pipe friction and the loss of head due to bends. Small rates of flow are 
measured by weighing the discharge on platform scales of 1,000-lb. capacity, while 
larger rates are weighed on a 10,000-lb. Fairbanks scale. The laboratory is fully 
equipped with gauges, manometers, and pitometers. 

Through the courtesy of the Morgantown Water Commission a 12-inch pipe line is 
available for pitometer work. A stream-flow measurement nation is maintained on 
the Monongahela River where a Stevens automatic stage recorder is installed and 
where a Price current meter is used to measure the river discharge. Rainfall records 
are obf ained from a Ferguson recording rain gage. 

The sanitary engineering laboratory is well equipped for student work in water 
purification and sewage disposal. Hydrogen-ion concentrations may be measured hv 
a Beckman pH meter, or by permanent color standards. Other colorimetric work is 
done with an electro-photometer. Turbidity may be measured by a U.S.G.S. rod, or 
by Jackson, Hellige or Baylis turbidimeters. Chlorine concentration in water is measur- 
ed colormetrically, chemically or by a W&T amperometric apparatus. An ozone gener- 
ator is available for studies in taste removal and disinfection. In addition, there is the 
usual supply of glassware, balances, chemicals, steam baths, burners, and muffle 
furnaces for mineral analvses; microscopes, special filters, and micrometers for algae 
studies; and pressure and dry-heat sterilizers, incubators, and special media for 
bacterial studies. 

A number of transits, levels, plane tables, and other surveying instruments arc 
used by students in working out field-surveying problems. Aerial photographs of 
neighboring territory are available to be used in photogrammetric mapping. Topog- 
raphy is obtained from these photographs by use of the Fairchild stero comparagraph. 
Diapositive aerial photographs are used with a multiplex projector to demonstrate 
another method of producing topographic details. Aerial mapping cameras are 
available for mapping that is done in cooperation with the Aeronautical Engineering 
Department. The usual supply of steel tapes, level rods, range poles, plumb bobs, 
etc., are available and are used by all engineering students. 

Through cooperation with the Testing Division of the State Road Commission, 
students are given experience with the actual work of testing all kinds of highway 
materials including tar, asphalt, paint, steel, oil, cement, sand, gravel, stone, concrete, 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 249 



drainage pipe, and soils. Equipment available includes constant temperature baths, 
viscosimeters, specific-gravity balances, drying ovens, furnaces, a three-compartment 
DeVal abrasion machine, a Los Angeles abrasion machine, diamond core drill, ball 
mill, briquette machine, Dory hardness machine, Page impact tester, small rock 
crusher, motor-driven vibrating screens for both coarse and fine aggregates, standard 
moulds for cement and concrete specimens, concrete mixer, brick rattler, Kriege and 
Hubbard-Field stability testers, a 30° -below-zero refrigerator for freezing-thawing 
tests, an "electric eye" turbidimeter for cement testing, and equipment for consolida- 
tion, shear, stability, and permeability tests on soils. 

The laboratories for chemical engineering unit operations and unit processes are 
well equipped for small-scale production of industrial chemicals and for conducting 
experimental work for the collection of performance and design data. Among the 
types of equipment in these laboratores are a Lummus 16-plate column still; a Badger 
copper fractionating unit fitted with an 8-inch, 15 plate bubble-cap column and all 
accessories including a 20-thermocouple temperature-measuring system; a Great West- 
ern pot still also fitted to operate as a steam still; Stokes double-effect evaporator 
with vacuum pump; 10-gallon Dopp vacuum pan; Devine crystallizer for both 
atmospheric and vacuum operation; Sperry filter press, open-delivery washing type, 
with montejus and pumps; Shriver stainless-steel portable self-contained filter 
unit, closed-delivery washing type; Oliver continuous rotary filter; American rotary 
disc filter; Kelly pressure filter; several crock filters; International centrifuge; Tolhurst 
center-slung variable speed centrifuge; Sharpies supercentrifuge; Proctor and Schwartz 
cabinet dryer with automatic-temperature and humidity controls; Devine vacuum- 
chamber dryer; Buflovak double-drum dryer for atmospheric or vacuum operation; 
large Freas precision drying oven; single-tube experimental heat exchanger with 
automatic multipoint temperature recorder; Ross Multitube, two-pass heat exchanger; 
"Karbate" absorption tower, nitrator, sulphonator, fusion pot, autoclave, and Z-blade 
mixer with stainless-steel bowl. 

In connection with this equipment there is provided a completely equipped mod- 
ern chemical laboratory furnished with specialized instruments and apparatus such 
as nitrometers, centrifugals, constant-temperature baths, refractometers, melting and 
boiling-point apparatus, turbidimeters, and colorimeters, together with apparatus for 
complete analytical, testing and control work. 

The ceramics laboratories are well equipped for instruction and research. They 
contain a muffle pottery kiln; Kutz clay-testing kiln; two fusion-point furnaces; frit 
and glass-melting furnace; general heating furnace and decorating kiln. All the 
kilns and furnaces are gas-fired and except for the pottery and decorating kiln, 
have individual motor-driven blowers. There are also available a number of small 
and medium-sized electric furnaces and a Hoskins heavy-duty large size furnace. The 
grinding equipment includes a jaw crusher; crushing rolls; sample grinder; hammer 
mill; wet pan; 18-inch by 25-inch ball mill; gang of six ball mills of three sizes and 
two gallon-size individual ball mills. A Federal unit for dust classification and a 
Tyler Ro-Tap sieve shaker are also part of the equipment. For plastic clay work 
there is provided a Patterson clay washing outfit, slip pump, filter press, and a vacuum 
pugmill, laboratory size; volumeters; jigger; and pottery wheels for individual use. 
Other equipment includes a spray booth; raw-materials bins; Fisher and Polaroid strain 
finders for glass. The laboratories are equipped for practically all routine tests and 
analyses. 

The metallurgy laboratory is well equipped for experimental work along the lines 
of heat treating, and photomicrographic examination of metals and alloys. Heat 
treating equipment includes a Tocca electronic high frequency induction heater, and 
several electric muffle furnaces with thermocouples and pyrometers. Metallographic 
equipment includes: a metallurgical specimen cut-off machine, a belt surfacer, 
specimen mounting presses, polishing tables each having three independently motor- 
driven polishing discs, seven metallurgical microscopes, two with camera attachments, 
a B & L metalloscope, a B & L research metalloscope complete with accessories, two 
darkrooms equipped with apparatus for developing, printing, enlarging, and color 
photography. Other equipment includes: two Westinghouse metallurgical X-ray 
units, a Reihle universal testing machine, and Rockwell hardness testers. 



250 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



The electrochemical industries laboratory contains a 1.2 kw. motor generator set 
for electroplating; tanks for electrolytic cleaning, rinsing, and plating; Reliance vari- 
able-speed polisning lathe; Ajax-Northrup high-frequencv furnace; Lectromelt 37.5 
kva. electric arc furnace; Vorce chlorine-caustic cell, Fisher titrimeter; hypochlorite 
cell, iodoform cell, clav dewatering cell; Fisher electro-analyser; Beckman pH meter 
with accessories; a number of rheostats, ammeters, voltmeters and potentiometers. 

The laboratory for water examination and investigations of liquid industrial 
wastes contains all the necessary apparatus, instruments, and chemical reagents for am 
required qualitative tests or quantitative determinations on boiler and industrial 
waters and trade wastes. For special tests and procedures there are available: an 
autoclave, drv-sterilizing oven, ammonia in water stills. Xessler tubes, biological and 
polarizing microscopes, counting cells, settling cones, incubators, Kober colorimeter, 
sets of color standards for complete range of hydrogen ion measurements, Jackson 
turbidimeter, U.S.G.S. color discs and tubes, and a Parr photoelectric turbidimeter for 
sulfate determinations. 

The fuels and oil-testing laboratories are supplied with a U. S. Steel Corporation 
type furnace and absorption chain for determining the by-product coking values of 
coals; a multiple-unit electric furnace and absorption chain for ultimate analysis of 
coal; Saybolt four-tube viscosimeter, special flasks and centrifuge tubes for determina- 
tion of water and sediment in oils; flash and fire-point testers, sulfur-in-oil outfit; 
Kjeldahl-nitrogen digestion and distillation equipment. Assemblies for analysis ot 
fuel and stack gases include Bureau of Standards precision, Orsat technical, Fisher 
precision, Hempel burettes and pipettes, referee total sulfur, and Tutwiler HaS 
burette, Reed vapor-pressure bomb for gasoline, Parr total-carbon apparatus, and Lovi- 
bond and A. P. A. colorimeters. 

The services available in the Chemical Engineering Department laboratories are: 
110-volt and 220-volt a.c, 2-volt to 150-volt d.c, superheated and saturated steam, 
compressed air, vacuum, gas, and hot and cold water. 

Other facilities available in this department are: (1) a large well-equipped drawing 
and design room with extensive collection of catalogues and texts on plant equip- 
ment and structures; (2) a locker room with individual student lockers, industrial 
washers, and showers; (3) a cold room with automatic-temperature control; (4) a 
well-equipped shop operated by a skilled mechanician; (5) a large stockroom for chem- 
icals, apparatus, and instruments, and having an adjacent special chamber for acid 
storage; and (6) separate research laboratories. 

The latest trade literature, catalogues, and reports of commercial developments 
in engineering are kept in classified files for students' reference. The University 
library has a thoroughly classified and indexed collection of the standard and latest 
books in engineering and the allied sciences, complete bound sets of the transactions 
of several scientific and engineering societies and current issues and bound volumes 
of the principal scientific technical periodicals. 

The extensive technical library donated by Mrs. Mary Dille Emory as a nucleus 
for a memorial to her husband, Prof. Frederick Lincoln Emory, deceased, is also 
available for use. 

School of Mines Laboratories 

The mining laboratories in the Mineral Industries Building are designed to 
supplement the technical instiuction related to the various phases of mining 
engineering and to correlate basic theory and principles with their application 
in industrial practice. 

The mining laboratory includes various types of electrical control systems as 
commonly used with modern mining equipment, especially arranged to permit analysis 
of the electrical circuits and operating principles. Specimens of typical equip- 
ment for drilling, cutting, and blasting are included, together with key assemblv 
parts of such units. There also are devices for demonstrating and determining the 
explosibility of suspended dusts, dust analysis equipment, apparatus for deter- 
mining dust counts, and models showing methods of working anthracite, bituminous 
coal, and mineral deposits. 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 251 



The mine ventilation laboratory is equipped with centrifugal and multistage 
axial flow fans, together with the necessary facilities for demonstrating the prin- 
ciples of fluid flow as related to mine ventilation and determination of the per- 
formance characteristics of the fans used. A gas testing room is provided for 
practice and demonstration with flame safety lamps and other gas detection devices. 
The laboratory is provided with apparatus and facilities for air analysis; and the 
William Clifford and James T. Beard collection of safety lamps is of particular 
academic interest as related to the history and development of mine lighting. 

The fuels laboratory is especially equipped for the analysis and study of fuels, 
with particular emphasis on coal and coke. The equipment includes analytical 
balances, calorimeters, drying and roasting ovens, fusion furnaces, and special 
equipment necessary for the proximate analysis of coal and the determination of 
coking and ash fusion characteristics. An X-ray diffraction unit is available for special 
analytical work. 

The coal preparation laboratory is outstanding in its facilities for coal testing 
and in the variety of coal cleaning and preparation equipment provided. The 
testing equipment includes facilities for screen analysis, float and sink separation, 
and the various units required to reduce and prepare samples for laboratory analysis. 
Cleaning equipment includes a sand media cone, a three-cell Baum-type jig, a 
calcium chloride washer, a heavy media cone washer, spiral separator, concentrating 
tables, basket jigs, an air cleaning table with filter-type dust collectors, a magnetic sep- 
arator, centrifuges, and a complete closed circuit mineral flotation unit. The cleaning 
units listed are all self-contained pilot units with auxiliary equipment to permit 
complete test operation and are in addition to a wide range of individual devices 
for demonstration and instructional purposes. 

The oil and gas laboratory contains a full range of equipment necessary for 
determination of the chemical and physical properties of oil and gases as related 
to their use, transmission, and production. Apparatus and facilities are provided for 
core analysis to determine saturations, porosity, permeability, and grain structure 
of producing sands, together with diamond core drills and saws for the prepar- 
ation of samples for such tests. Also included are various specimens of drilling 
and other production equipment for instruction and demonstration, together with 
rotary drilling mud testing apparatus. The gas measurement section includes bell- 
tpyes, critical flow, and low pressure flow provers for testing meters of various types. 
Also provided is a wide range of domestic, orifice and large capacity displacement 
meters with the necessary meter runs for their operation. 

Special equipment for instruction in geophysics is provided, and the school 
maintains an earth-movement recording seismograph station, operated in accordance 
with standards approved by the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, for recording earth- 
quakes and the movement of severe storm zones. Portable blast seismic instruments 
are available for field testing and demonstration. 

U. S. Bureau of Mines Station 

The United States Bureau of Mines maintains on the campus, laboratory and 
pilot-plant facilities for research and development work on the production of 
synthesis gas from coal, which is part of the Bureau's over-all program for 
synthetic liquid fuel development. 

Under the terms of a cooperative agreement between the University and the 
Bureau, students are employed by the Bureau on a part-time basis. 

A limited number of graduate students may be appointed as Bureau of 
Mines Fellows to work on research problems of interest to the Bureau. With the 
approval of the students' theses advisory committees, the problems may also be 
accepted as research for theses requirements. The students so selected have an 
opportunity to work under the joint supervision of government experts and Uni- 
versity staff members. 

In the selection of part-time student workers, preference is given to those 
in the upper third of their class. 

The Bureau staff also conducts a graduate seminar in coal research. In this 
seminar, research problems and methods are discussed, with special reference to 
applications to the Bureau's current problem. 



252 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Facilities for Inspection Trips 

The University is located in a region which affords the student unusual oppor- 
tunities for practical observation and education in engineering. Morgantown is the 
center of an extensive coal region in which are large workings of the Pittsburgh, 
Sewickley, and upper Freeport seams, while nearby are the Fairmont and Connells- 
ville fields. West Virginia's gas and oil district approaches within four miles of the 
city. The region abounds with rich deposits of glass sand, limestone, clay, shales, and 
valuable building stone. 

Within the city limits and in nearby towns are numerous factories and plants, 
including large steam and hydraulic central stations for the production of electric 
power, cement plants, extensive glass factories manufacturing glass of every descrip- 
tion, an anhydrous ammonia plant, brick plants, by-products coking plants, brass 
plant, brass and iron foundries, large oil- and gas-pumping stations, glass sand and 
limestone-crushing plants, etc. 

Pittsburgh, the center of the world's greatest iron and steel industries, is onlv 
seventy-four miles from the University. The Wheeling area, with its large steel and 
ceramic industries and its large modern central stations, is approximately the same 
distance. The rapidly expanding Ohio River Valley industrial area in the vicinity 
of Parkersburg and the concentration of plants in the Kanawha Valley affords an 
excellent opportunity to visit large modern chemical plants. 

Organized inspection trips under faculty supervision are taken each year. Credit 
for one inspection trip is required for graduation. 

Professional Societies 

engineering society 

The Engineering Society is conducted by the students of the College of Engineer- 
ing and School of Mines under the direction of a faculty committee. Students taking 
any of the four-year curricula leading to the baccalaureate degrees in engineering are 
required to engage actively in the work of the society during the third and fourth 
years. The Engineering Society has close connections with the West Virginia 
Society of Professional Engineers. 

NATIONAL SOCIETIES 

Student chapters of the following national societies are maintained: Institute 
of the Aeronautical Sciences, American Society of Agricultural Engineers, American 
Institute of Chemical Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio Engineers, American Institute of 
Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and 
Society for Advancement of Management. Meetings of these student branches are 
held weekly. 

The West Virginia Alpha Chapter of Tau Beta Pi was installed at West Virginia 
University on June 3, 1922. Tau Beta Pi is the honorary engineering fraternity and 
has chapters in more than ninety of the leading engineering colleges. Member- 
ship may be conferred upon candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Aeronautical, Agricultural, Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, and Mining Engi- 
neering who have maintained a rank in scholarship in the highest fifth of the class. 

The West Virginia Upsilon Chapter of Sigma Gamma Epsilon was installed at 
West Virginia University on May 27, 1927. Sigma Gamma Epsilon is an honorary 
mineral industries fraternity with chapters in thirty of the leading universities. Sen- 
iors and juniors in mining engineering and majors in metallurgy and ceramics in 
chemical engineering who have attained high scholarship rank are eligible for mem- 
bership. 

The West Virginia Pi Gamma Chapter of Pi Tau Sigma was installed at West 
Virginia University on March 31, 1942. This is an honorary mechanical engineering 
fraternity with chapters in fifty-seven universities. Seniors and juniors in mechanical 
engineering who have attained a high scholastic rank are eligible for membership. 

The West Virginia Beta Rho Chapter of Eta Kappa Nu was installed at West 
Virginia University on May 2, 1947. Eta Kappa Nu, national electrical engineering 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 253 



honorary society, has qualifications for membership which distinctly stimulate and 
reward high scholarship. The upper one-fourth of the junior class and the upper 
one-third of the senior class who have high scholastic standings and good character 
are eligible for membership. 

A loan fund is maintained by the local chapter for students enrolled in the 
College of Engineering. 

The West Virginia Chapter of Chi Epsilon was installed at West Virginia Univer- 
sity on May 14, 1949. This is an honorary civil engineering fraternity with chapters 
in thirty-nine colleges and universities. Seniors and juniors in civil engineering who 
have attained a high scholastic rank are eligible for membership. 

Standing Committees 

Engineering Schedules: Professor E. C. Jones. 

Engineering Society: Professors Downs, Longhouse, and Simons; Associate Professor 

Baker; Assistant Professors Dubbe and Ulrich. 
Library: Professors Seibert and Speiden and Assistant Professor Peer. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



Any student, in order to be eligible to receive a Bachelor's degree in any 
branch of engineering for which degrees are offered, in addition to satisfying 
all entrance requirements shall be required to complete satisfactorily 144 semester 
hours of work as specified in the curriculum of the department leading to the 
degree for which the student is a candidate, plus the general requirements of 
physical education and military science required by the University for such a degree. 

SUBSTITUTIONS 

The following substitutions are regularly allowed in addition to special 
substitutions listed elsewhere: 

Speech 11 for Speech 13. M.E. 25 for C.E. 110. 
Chemistry 5, 6, 106, 15 or 115 (2 to 5 hrs.) M.E. 20 for M.E. 27. 

for Chemistry 10. Physics 1, 2, 3, 4, 109, and 110 for Physics 

Chemistry 115 for Chemistry 15. 105, 106, 107, and 108. 

Economics 1 and 2 for Economics 5. A.E. 208 for M.E. 122 

THESIS 

Any candidate for a baccalaureate degree in engineering may with the con- 
sent of his major professor prepare a thesis on some subject relating to a 
special branch of engineering or other department of applied science. It will 
be presented for approval first to the instructor under whose guidance it has been 
prepared, then to the head of the department in which the degree is to be 
conferred. A typewritten copy of the thesis prepared in accordance with official 
specifications and signed by both the instructor in charge and the head of the 
department, must be placed in the Universitv library before graduation. 

MILITARY AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Eight hours of Military and two hours of physical education are required 
of every male student entering the University and presenting fewer than 58 hours 
unless previous credit has been allowed. Such student is given a complete medical and 
physical examination at the beginning of the University school year to determine 
his general fitness for active participation in University activities. During the 
year he must demonstrate ability, beyond that of a novice, in at least three 
different activities. 

All female students are required to take four semester hours of physical education 
unless permanently exempted. 

Students entering with 58 hours credit are exempted. 



254 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CURRICULA 

The several four-year curricula are set up to give, in the first two years, 
a well-rounded training in the basic sciences of mathematics, chemistry, and physics 
and in English. A moderate amount of shop work, drawing and surveying is 
given to introduce the student to the practical side of engineering. 

This is followed by such technical subjects as mechanics, thermodynamics, and 
electricity, the degree of emphasis varying somewhat with the curriculum followed. 
These courses bridge the gap between the pure sciences and the professional 
courses. 

In the third and fourth years special emphasis is placed on the professional 
work of the engineer. In the fourth year a certain number of credit hours are 
available for electives. These electives may be technical subjects, a list of which 
is given for each curriculum, or they may include advanced military courses up to 
and including 6 credit hours; 01 they may include, subject to the approval of the 
head of department, wholly or in part nontechnical subjects in the field of English, 
geology, journalism, speech, foreign language, history, political science, sociology, 
philosophy, economics, business administration, psychology, and humanities or any 
course in the 200 series. 

1. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Aeronautical Engineering. 

2. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Agricultural Engineering. 

3. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Chemical Engineering, with options in metallurgy and ceramics. 

4. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil 
Engineering, with option in sanitary engineering. 

5. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Electrical Engineering, with options in power and communications. 

6. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Mechanical Engineering, with option in power and industrial engineering. 

7. Combined science and engineering curricula extending over five or more 
years leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Science in 
Engineering. 

Plan for Numbering Courses 

For convenience it is customary to designate the course of study by the 
name of the department or group of departments and the number of the particular 
course. Whenever reference is made to engineering courses in the course announce- 
ments and textual matter the department or groups of departments will be in- 
dicated as follows: 

Aeronautical Engineering A.E. Mechanical Engineering M.E. 

Agricultural Engineering Ag.E. Mechanics M. 

Chemical Engineering Ch.E. Mining Engineering E.M. 

Civil Engineering C.E. General G. 

Electrical Engineering E.E. 

The plan for numbering courses is as follows: 

Courses 1 to 99— intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores. 
Courses 100 to 199— junior and senior courses not open to graduates. 
Courses 200 to 299— advanced courses for juniors, seniors, and graduates. 
Courses 300 to 399— advanced courses open only to graduates. 

Classification of Students 

To be classified as a freshman in the College of Engineering or School of Mines 
a student must have credit for at least 15 units of entrance requirements. To be 
classified as a sophomore he must have credit toward his degree for 30 hours; as a 
junior 72 hours; as a senior 112 hours; except that a student who is a candidate for the 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 255 



degree of Bachelor of Science to be classified as a sophomore must have credit for 
27 hours of college work; as a junior, 60 hours; as a senior, 94 hours. 

The Freshman Schedule 

In order to permit all students in the College of Engineering and the School 
of Mines to have a year in which to find out definitely what curriculum they 
wish to pursue, the first year of all engineering curricula is made uniform. To 
assist the student in making an intelligent choice, a series of weekly lectures is given 
throughout the first semester explaining the work of the several branches of eng- 
ineering. 

FIRST YEAR 

(Identical for all engineering and mining courses) 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Chem 1— Inorganic Chem 4 C.E. 1— Surveying 2 

Eng. 1— Comp. and Rhet 3 Chem. 2— Inorganic Chem 4 

G. 1— Engineering Lectures Eng. 2— Comp. and Rhet 3 

Math. 3— College Algebra 3 Math. 5— Analytical Geom 4 

Math. 4— Plane Trig 3 M.E. 26 Descriptive Geom 3 

M.E. 20— Mechanical Drawing 3 Mil. 2— Mil. or Air 2 

Mil. 1 -Mil. or Air 2 P.E. 2-Ser. Prog. (Men) 1 

P.E. 1-Ser. Prog. (Men) 1 

19 19 

CURRICULUM IN AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING (\ * 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Engineering r t I ■ 

Aeionautical Engineering includes the following major subjects: Theroretical 
aerodynamics, applied aerodynamics, aircraft structures, propulsion, and aircraft Hn 'v 
design. Owing to the rapid progress in aeronautical science in the past fifteen 
years, each of these represents a particular field of specialization. 

The aeronautical engineering curriculum is designed to prepare the student for 
any of the fields listed above. With the exception of electives, all of the courses 
are considered to be fundamental and are required of all students. Elective courses 
are taken during the senior year and furnish an opportunity for the student to take 
advanced work in any field he chooses. 

The first year for aeronautical engineering students is the same as that for all 
freshmen in the College of Engineering. Most of the courses outlined for the second 
year are of a fundamental nature. Except for a few variations, the sophomore pro- 
gram resembles those of the other engineering curricula. The second year program 
includes physics, calculus, statics, mechanism, machine shop and nontechnical 
courses which include public speaking, advanced composition and a nontechnical 
elective. By the end of the second year the student is expected to have a command of 
written and spoken English, mechanical drawing and sufficient mathematics, physics 
and mechanics to prepare him for the advanced work to follow. 

Advanced courses begin with the summer session following the sophomore year. 
The curriculum for the summer session and the junior year consists chiefly of work 
in aeronautical engineering, mechanics, thermodynamics, advanced mathematics and 
courses in electrical engineering and economics. 

The fourth year is made up almost entirely of courses in the aeronautical engi- 
neering department. A course in ferrous and nonferrous metallurgy, business law and 
internal combustion engines are included in the senior program. Eleven hours 
electives are required in the fourth year program. At least five hours of these elec- 
tives must be chosen from the approved technical list. The remaining six hours 
may be in the form of technical or non-technical electives. An inspection trip is re- 
quired of all fourth year students. This trip is made in the spring and may include 
visits to government aeronautical research laboratories or aircraft manufacturing 
plants. 



256 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Many laboratory courses are included in the curriculum. They are taken in 
conjunction with the work of a theoretical nature. In addition to their instructional 
value, the laboratory courses afford an excellent opportunity for the student to 
acquire practical laboratory techniques. Third-year and fourth-year laboratory 
courses are operated much the same as industrial and research laboratories operate 

The Aeronautical Engineering laboratories consist of: 

1. Aerodynamics Laboratory— a. 200-mile-per-hour wind tunnel is used for sup- 
plementing instruction in theoretical aerodynamics, stability determination, 
airplane performance and for instruction in instrumentation. 

2. Structures Laboratory— for static testing of airplane components, center of 
gravity determination on complete airplanes and for supplementing the theory 
of stress analysis. 

3. Design Laboratory— for third and fourth-year courses in aerodynamic and 
structural design. 

4. Flight Hangar— for purposes of flight training in University airplanes and 
for furnishing opportunity for first-hand instruction in aircraft operation 
and maintenance. The flight program is approved by the Civil Aeronautics 
Authority. Students may obtain a private pilot certificate after two semesters 
of flight training. 

5. Flight Test Airplane— a. Cessna model 170A airplane is used as a flying labora- 
tory for a course in flight testing. 

SECOND YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Eng.126-Adv.Comp 2 M. 101— Statics 3 

Math. 107-Calculus 4 Math. 108-Calculus 4 

M.E. 1 1 -Machine Work 2 M.E. 27-Mechanism 2 

Mil. 3-Mil. or Air 2 Mil. 4— Mil. or Air 2 

Phys. 105— General Physics 4 Phys. 106— General Physics 4 

Phys. 107— General Physics Lab 1 Phys. 108— General Physics Lab 1 

Speech 11— Public Speaking 3 Nontechnical* 3 

18 19 

SLIMMER SESSION 

A. E. 216-Aricraft Detail Design 2 

C. E. 115— Fluid Mechanics 2 

M. 104— Kinetics 3 



THIRD YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

A.E. 201— Elem. Aerodynamics 3 A. E. 202— Aerodynamics 3 

G. 101 -Engineering Society y 2 A.E. 209-Aircraft Perf. & Stab 4 

M. 102-Mechanics of Matls 4 A.E. 210-Basic Aircraft Struc 3 

M. 103— Materials Testing Lab 1 Econ. 5— Fund, of Economics 3 

Math. 253-Adv. Applied Math 3 E.E. 110-Elements of E.E 5 

M. E. 221— Thermodynamics 3 G. 101 -Engineering Society V2 

Nontechnical* 3 

17V 2 18V 2 

*The six hours of required nontechnical courses are to be selected from the 
above list on pag-e 257. 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 257 



SENIOR YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

A.E. 207— Aerodynamic Design 3 A.E. 205— Experimental Aerodyn 2 

A.E. 211— Redundant Aircraft Struc. .. 3 A.E. 212— Applied Aircraft Design 3 

A.E. 217— Aircraft Structural Des 3 A.E. 213— Aircraft Structures Lab 1 

Ch.E. 150— Metallurgy 3 G. 100-Inspection Trip 

M.E. 229— Int. Comb. Engines 3 G. 101— Engineering Society V 2 

G. 101— Engineering Society V2 G. 190— Business Law 3 

Electives * 3 Electives 8 

18 % 17 V 2 

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES 

A.E. 203— Applied Aerodynamics 3 A.E. 222-Aircraft Propulsion 2 

A.E. 208-Flight Testing 2 A.E. 299-Thesis 2-6 

A.E. 214-Adv. Aircraft Struc 3 A.E. 171-2-3 Flight Training 1-3 

A.E. 218-Aeroelasticity 3 Mil. 105-108 Adv. Military 1-6 

A.E. 220-Seminar 2-6 Nontechnical 1-6 

At least five hours of senior electives must be chosen from the above technical list. 

History 52 3 Political Science 101 3 

History 53 3 Sociology 1 3 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING I 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

Agricultural Engineering is the application of engineering principles to agri- 
culture. Success in Wit application of engineering fundamentals to the agricultural 
industry requires knowledge of both the biological and physical sciences. The 
purpose of the course is to give the student who completes it general training 
in agricultural and engineering fundamentals. Considerable stress is given to 
basic requirements of plant and animal life on the farm which affect engineering 
practices, but greater emphasis is placed on a thorough knowledge of those under- 
lving principles and methods which are the foundation of all the engineering 
professions. 

The first two years are devoted to those basic preparatory courses which are 
essential to the more technical work which follows in the third and fourth years. 

The studies pursued during the third and fourth years are of fundamental im- 
portance to the agricultural engineer. Although the curriculum gives no opportunity 
for specialization, Agricultural Engineering is made up of four major fields. These 
are Farm Power and Machinery, Farm Structures, Soil and Water Conservation, 
and Rural Electrification. 

Poiver and Machinery involves all power u^ed in agriculture, except electricity, 
and all farm implements and machines and their components and related equipment. 

Rural Electrification involves all activities concerned primarily with application 
of electricity to farm and farmstead, especially the creation of distinctly economic 
agricultural uses for electricity. 

Farm Structures involves all buildings and in general fixed improvements of 
equipment or farm and farmsteads. 

Soil and Water involves all measures of an engineering nature for the con- 
servation, utilization, and management of soil and water resources. 

Students preparing to take Agricultural Engineering should present for en- 
trance as many units as possible in mathematics, chemistry, and physics; also 
sufficient farm experience to meet the College of Agriculture requirements. 

Occupations and Opportunities. Some of the organizations and industries em- 
ploying agricultural engineers are electric power companies and co-operatives; farm 
machinery manufacturers and distributors; manufacturers and distributors of build- 
ing materials; oil companies; electric equipment and other supplies for farm utilities; 
trust companies; farm management agencies; federal agencies such as Soil Conservation 
Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Bureau of Reclamation, 



258 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Production and Marketing Administration, Federal Land Bank, and Indian Service; 
colleges and universities; Army and Navy, and foreign governments. 

Opportunities for employment are numerous. At no time since the establish- 
ment of the profession has it been crowded; the outlook is good for a continuance 
of this situation. With agriculture becoming increasingly mechanized, the demand 
for agricultural engineers is increasing and should continue to increase. New 
opportunities arise as mechanization continues. Starting salaries are in line with 
salaries in other branches of engineering. 



SUMMER SESSION FOLLOWING FIRST YEAR' 



Hr. 

Econ. 5— Fund, of Economics 3 M.E. 

M.E. 7-Welding & Heat Treatment . . 1 M.E. 



Hr. 

1 1— Machine Work 2 

12— Machine Work 1 



SECOND YEAR 



First Sem. 



Hr. Second Sem. 



Agron. 1— Farm Crops 4 

Math. 107-Calculus 4 

M.E. 29— Mechanism 4 

Mil. 3-Mil. or Air 2 

Phys. 105-G. Physics 4 

Phys. 107-G. Physics Lab 1 



19 



Hr. 



Bot. 2— General Botany 4 

Math. 108-Calculus 4 

M. 101-Statics 3 

Mil. 4— Mil. or Air 2 

Phys. 106-G. Physics 4 

Phys. 108— G. Physics Lab 1 



18 



THIRD YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Chem. 131— Organic Chem 4 

E.E. 102-Elem. of E.E 4 

G. 101— Engineering Society % 

M.E. 221— Thermodynamics 3 

M. 102-Mech. of Matls 4 

Speech 13-Public Spk 2 

i7y 2 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Dairy Husb. 12— Farm Dairying 3 

E.E. 103-Elem. of E.E 4 

G. 101— Engineering Society V2 

M.E. 113— Machine Design 4 

M.E. 222-Heat Engines 3 

M. 104-Kinetics 3 

17% 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Ag. E. 140-Soil & Water Cons 3 

Ag. E. 230-Farm Power 4 

C.E.I 15— Fluid Mechanics 2 

C.E. 119-Fluid Mechanics Lab 1 

C.E. 122-Structural Eng'g 3 

G. 101— Engineering Society V2 

Hort. 3-Prin. of Hort 3 

M.E. 123-Engg. Lab 2 

18% 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Ag. E. 100— Farm Structures 3 

Ag. E. 110-App. of E. to Agr 2 

Ag. E. 190— Farm Machinery 3 

Agron. 2— Soils 4 

Accounting 1— Accounting 3 

G. 101— Engineering Society % 

M.E. 203— Adv. Machine Design 4 

G. 100 Inspection Trip 

19% 



*First Year Curriculum: See page 255. 

CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING K 

J 1 / 57 / K" "3 I 

Degrees'. Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering / ~ 

The standard four-year course in chemical engineering has been developed to 
qualify young men for positions in operation, design, construction, and manage- 
ment of manufacturing plants in which raw materials are subjected to chemical 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 259 



changes to produce finished products. This curriculum includes fundamental 
courses: in mathematics through calculus; in chemistry— inorganic, analytical, organic, 
and physical; in physics; in basic engineering— surveying, mechanical drawing, me- 
chanics, and strength of materials; in electrical engineering; in metallurgy; in chem- 
ical engineering— principles, calculations, thermodynamics, design, unit operations, 
unit processes, and economics; in electro-chemical, inorganic, and organic technology. 
This curriculum provides the student with a broad foundation in the fundamental 
principles of those subjects which wide experience has shown are essential for a 
successful career in the chemical engineering profession; or as engineers in any in- 
dustry involving a succession of unit operations and unit processes. 

To complete the requirements for the B.S.Ch.E. Degree in four years, students 
should follow the curriculum as outlined, taking all required shop courses and 
speech in the Summer Session; it is also definitely advisable to take Organic Chem- 
istry 233 and 238 in the Summer Session before the third year. Modifications in the 
standard chemical engineering curriculum for the ceramic and metallurgy options 
are outlined below. 

Students preparing to take chemical engineering should present for entrance 
as many units as possible in mathematics, chemistry, and physics, also units in 
German. French, or Spanish. While certain basic courses in English, economics, 
and public speaking are required in the regular Ch.E. curriculum, a student will 
obtain a broader education in economics, history, language, science, applied tech- 
nology, and engineering by taking the combined Bachelor of Science and Chemical 
Engineering course. By a careful selection of electives both degrees may be earned 
in five years. 

In recognition of the increasing tendency on the part of industry to promote 
engineers to administrative and executive positions, the curriculum has been broad- 
ened to include more required work in the field of humanities. In addition, the 
number of hours of elective courses have been increased, all of which may be se- 
lected from the humanities and business administration courses. 

In addition to the demand for students trained in chemical engineering there is 
considerable demand in the state for men trained in ceramics, metallurgy, and fuel 
technology, fields closely allied with chemical engineering. A basic course in general 
metallurgy is required of all students seeking a degree in chemical engineering. In 
addition, students may elect technology in their undergraduate and especially in 
their graduate programs. These courses are integrated with the chemical engineer- 
ing courses, making use of many of the unit process and unit operation concepts com- 
mon to these categories. 

The department, along with the other departments of the College of Engineer- 
ing and the School of Mines is a part of the Engineering Experiment Station. The 
combined facilities of the Department and the Station are available for investigation 
and research. The greater number of projects are so selected that graduate students, 
and to some extent undergraduate students, participate in the program. The work 
of the Engineering Experiment Station thus is part of the educational program. 

SUMMER SESSION FOLLOWING FIRST YEAR* 

Hr. 

M.E. 7— Welding and Heat Treatment 1 

M.E. 11-Machine Work 2 

Speech 13-Public Speaking 2 



260 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



SECOND YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Ch.E. 100-Ch.E. Operations 2 

Chem. 15— Quant. Analysis 3 

Econ. 5— Fund, of Economics 3 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Mil. 3-Mil. or Air 2 

Phys. 105-G. Physics 4 

Phys. 107-G. Physics Lab 1 



19 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Ch.E. 140-Ch.E. Calculations 2 

Eng. 126-Adv. Comp 2 

M. 101-Statics 3 

Math. 108-Calculus 4 

Mil. 4— Mil. or Air 2 

Phys. 106-G. Physics 4 

Phys. 108— G. Physics Lab 1 



18 



THIRD YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Ch.E. 205-Principles of Ch.E 5 

Chem. 233— Organic Chem 4 

Chem. 260— Physical Chem 4 

G. 101— Engineering Society i/ 2 

M. 102-Mech. of Materials 4 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Ch.E. 150-Gen. Metallurgy 3 

Ch.E. 207-Prin. of Ch.E 5 

Chem. 238— Organic Chem 4 

Chem. 261— Physical Chem 4 

Electives 2 

G. 101— Engineering Society % 



17% 



I81/2 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Ch.E. 211-Chem. Eng'g. Lab 2 

Ch.E. 234-Inorg. Chem. Tech 2 

Ch.E. 242-Ch.E. Thermo 3 

Ch.E. 272-Ch.E. Design 3 

Electives 4 

E.E. 110-Elements of E.E 5 

G. 101— Engineering Society 72 



i9y 2 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Ch.E. 212-Chem. Eng'g. Lab 2 

Ch.E. 235-Org. Chem. Tech. 2 

Ch.E. 238-Electrochem. Ind 3 

Ch.E. 243-Ch.E. Thermo 3 

Ch.E. 273-Chem. Eng'g. Design 3 

Electives 5 

G. 101— Engineering Society V2 

G. 100— Inspection Trip 

i8y 2 



RECOMMENDED EEECTIVES 



C.E. 122- Structural Eng'g 2-3 

Ch.E. 297-Thesis 2-5 

Ch.E. 281— Fuels Technology 2-3 

Ch.E. 253-Nonferrous Met 2 

Ch.E. 252-Ferrous Metallurgy 2 

Ch. E. 262-Refractories 2 

*First Year Curriculum: See page 255. 
|See page 254 for list of subjects. 



Geol. 1-G.Geology 3 

German 1 and 2 6 

Mil. 105-108-Adv. Military 1-6 

M. 103-Matls. Test. Lab 1 

M.E. 205— Industrial Eng'g 3 

Nontechnical? 1-6 



CURRICULUM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

The civil engineering curriculum has been planned to give a broad coverage 
of those general and scientific subjects that form the foundation of all engineering 
and a special training in the civil engineering field. The first year's work is the 
same as that for other branches of engineering, permitting the student to select 
his field after a year of college study. 

Some general subjects are included in most of the semesters of the four-year 
program. These are intended to improve and enrich the student's contacts with 
other people and include English, public speaking, economics, accounting, and busi- 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 261 



ness law. In addition to drawing, physics, and mathematics, which form the roots 
of an engineering course, the student investigates such fields as chemistry, geology, 
and bacteriology. These give a breadth of training in the sciences. 

A thorough study of the fundamentals of plane and topographic surveying is 
scheduled for the first two years and the following summer when the student spends 
five weeks at Camp R. L. Morris near Terra Alta, West Virginia, concentrating on 
field surveys. Professional training in photogrammetry may be elected during the 
fourth year to round out this work. 

Courses in mechanics, electrical engineering, and heat and power engineering 
furnish breadth of training in engineering and depth of training comes from pro- 
fessional work in highway, railway, structural, sanitary, and hydraulic engineering, 
any of which may be the specialty of the civil engineer. 

Civil Engineering includes the measurement of land surfaces and the production 
of maps, the design, construction, and operation of transportation facilities, the design 
and construction of fixed structures, sanitary and municipal engineering, and hydraulic 
engineering. 

The measurement of land surfaces is done by some kind of surveying such as plane, 
topographic, or geodetic. The survey may be conducted entirely on the surface or it 
may combine the use of surface and aerial methods. Transportation facilities divide 
readily into highway, railway, water, and air groups, the work of the civil engineer 
being most directly concerned with the construction and maintenance of the fixed por- 
tions of the system in each case. Among the large number of fixed structures in the 
civil engineer's field are bridges, buildings, tunnels, subways, foundations, walls and 
piers. Sanitary and municipal engineering cover the design, maintenance, and opera- 
tion of water supplies, water purification plants, distribution systems, sewer systems, 
sewage-disposal plants, and garbage-disposal plants. Hydraulic engineering deals 
with the design and construction of water-power installations, dry docks, locks and 
dams, flood control, and irrigation projects. 

The civil engineering professional field is too wide to be covered thoroughly in 
a four-year course. For this reason, during the last year of the course, certain options 
are offered. In addition to the sanitary engineering option outlined below, the student 
in the fourth year is offered a choice between taking two elective courses or doing 
research and preparing a thesis. 



kL^Jj - iiixi*-* I 



Civil Engineering: Sanitary Option 

Students in civil engineering who desire to specialize in sanitary engineering are 
required to make the following regular substitutions: 

Fourth year: first semester: C.E. 202, Water Purification, 3 hr., for C.E. 103. 
C.E. 117, Municipal Engineering, is required instead of the 2 hours of elective sub- 
jects. Second semester: C.E. 203, Sewage Disposal, 3 hr., for C.E. 204. C.E. 281, Water 
Analysis, is required instead of 2 hours of elective subjects. 

SECOND YEAR* 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Chem. 10-Quant. Analysis 2 C.E. 3-Railroad Curves 2 

C.E. 2— Surveying 4 Geol. 1— G. Geology 3 

Math. 107-Calculus 4 Math. 108-Calculus 4 

Mil. 3— Mil. or Air 2 M. 101-Statics 3 

Phys. 105— Gen. Physics 4 Mil. 4-Mil. or Air 2 

Phys. 107-Gen. Physics Lab 1 Phys. 106-Gen. Physics 4 

Speech 13-Pub. Sp'k 2 Phys. 108-Gen. Physics Lab 1 

19 19 

C.E. 4— Summer Surveying (five weeks) 5 

*First Year Curriculum: See page 255. 



262 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



THIRD YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

C.E. 110-Struct. Drafting 2 

Econ. 5— Fund, of Econ 3 

E.E. 110-Elements of E.E 5 

G. 101— Engineering Society i/ 2 

M. 102-Mech. of Materials 4 

M. 103-Materials Test. Lab 1 

M.E. 220-Heat & Power Eng'g 3 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Bact. 141— Bacteriology 3 

Acct. 5— Acct. for Engrs 2 

C.E. 101— EL of Hwy. Eng'g 3 

C.E. 115-Fluid Mechanics 2 

C.E. 119-Fluid Mechanics Lab 1 

C.E. 121-Structural Eng'g 4 

G. 101— Engineering Society Va 

Geol. 2-Geol. Lab 1 

M. 104-Kinetics 3 



18i/ 2 



19i/ 2 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

C.E. 103-Highway Design 3 

C.E. 116— Water Supply Eng'g 4 

C.E. 120-Materials of Constr 2 

C.E. 123-Bridge Design 3 

C.E. 207-Foundations 3 

Elect ives— (see below) 2 

G. 101— Engineering Society V& 



17i/ 2 



Second Sem. Hr. 

C.E. 102-Railway Eng'g 3 

C.E. 1 18-Sewerage 3 

C.E. 204-Advanced Structs 3 

C.E. 206-Reinforced Concrete 3 

Electives— (see below) 2 

G. 101— Engineering Society i/ 2 

G. 190— Business Law 3 

G. 100— Inspection Trip 

17i/2 



RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES 



C.E. 210-Photogrammetry 2 

Mil. 105-108-Adv. Military 1-6 

tNontechnical 1-4 



C.E. 124-Thesis 2-4 

C.E. 200-Water Power Eng'g 2 

C.E. 208-Trans. Econ 2 

C.E. 209-Highway Lab 2 

NOTE: Students offering 6 hours of Advanced Military for Engineers toward 
their degree are not required to take Speech 13. 

tSee page 254 for list of subjects. 

CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING & 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

The course in electrical engineering has been developed for the purpose of giving 
the student who completes the course general training in engineering fundamentals 
and broad training in the field of electrical engineering. Special training in the 
electrical power field and the communications field or both is available in the senior 
year. 

In the first two years of electrical engineering the work is confined mostly to 
those subjects which are essential as preparatory courses for the more technical 
courses in the third and fourth years. 

The first year is the same as that for all freshmen in the College of Engineering. 
A summer term is scheduled between the first and second year. It consists of one 
shop course and an elementary electrical engineering course, part of which is 
laboratory and shop work. It is advisable for students to plan to attend this summer 
term so that they may continue the regularly scheduled courses during the remaining 
three years. In many cases, students elect to take additional courses during this 
summer term, thus reducing their schedule in the remaining years. With a few 
exceptions, the schedule of courses in the sophomore year is the same as those of 
other departments. These courses also are of a fundamental nature. 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 263 



During the third year, fundamental courses in electrical engineering are intro- 
duced. An additional mathematics course of special importance to electrical engi- 
neering is included, as well as other fundamental engineering subjects. 

In the fourth year the curriculum is made up almost entirely of courses in 
electrical engineering. During this year, the student elects a group of courses per- 
taining to the field of communications or to the field of electric power (see below) . 
The student also has a choice of six hours of elective courses. The electives may 
be technical or nontechnical subjects, thus giving the student an opportunity to 
either broaden his training or to continue further specialization in engineering 
fields. 

It will be observed that for many of the courses scheduled in this curriculum, the 
work of the classroom is supplemented by concurrent work in the laboratory or draft- 
ing room. By means of experimental work in the laboratory, followed with well- 
written reports and problems in the design of electrical apparatus, the student ac- 
quires a clearer conception of the facts and principles discussed in the classroom and 
also a working knowledge of the subject matter. All of this is essential if he is to be- 
come a successful electrical engineer. 

In the course in electrical industry as a public utility, general economic con- 
siderations are applied to the generation, transmission, and utilization of electrical 
power, together with the selection of electrical and allied equipment from an economic 
standpoint; also a study and analysis is made of rate structures. This course and 
the courses in business law, English, and economics are valuable inclusions in the 
electrical engineering curriculum for the student who is interested in taking up 
administrative work. 

Communications Option—Students in Electrical Engineering who desire to 
specialize in the field of communications are required to take the following courses 
in their senior year: E.E. 262, Communications Lab (1 hr.); E.E. 264, Radio Engineer- 
ing (3 hr.); and E.E. 265, Radio Laboratory (3 hr.). Courses required for power 
option may be used as electives. 

Power Option— Students who desire to specialize in the field of electric power 
are required to take the following courses in their senior year: E.E. 234, A.C. 
Machinery Laboratory (1 hr.); E.E. 282, Symmetrical Components (3 hr.); and 
M.E. 222, Heat Engines (3 hr.). Courses required for communications option mav 
be used as electives. 

SUMMER SESSION FOLLOWING FIRST YEAR* 

Hr. Hr. 

E.E. 10 Intro. Elect. Eng'g 3 M.E. 11-Machine Work 2 

SECOND YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Econ. 5— Fund, of Economics 3 E.E. 100— Fund, of Elec 4 

Eng. 126-Adv. Comp 2 M. 101-Statics 3 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Mil. 3-Mil. or Air 2 Mil. 4-Mil. or Air 2 

Phys. 105— G. Physics 4 Phys. 106— G. Physics 4 

Phys. 107— G. Physics Lab 1 Phys. 108— G. Physics Lab 1 

Speech 11-Public Spk 3 

19 18 

*First Year Curriculum: See pag-e 255. 



264 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



THIRD YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

E.E. 130-D. C. Machinery 3 

E.E. 131-D. C. Mach. Lab; 2 

E.E. 135— A. C. Theory 3 

E.E. 136-A. C. Theory Lab 2 

G. 101— Eng'g. Society i/ 2 



Math. 253-Adv. Applied Math. 



3 



M. 104-Kinetics 3 

M.E. 221-Thermo 3 

19i/ 2 



Second Sem. Hr. 

E.E. 232— A. C Machinery 4 

E.E. 243-Eleci Calc 2 

E.E. 250— Electronics 4 

E.E. 260— Network Anal 3 

G. 101 -Eng'g. Society % 

M. 102-Mech. of Materials 4 

M.E. 122-Mech. Lab 2 



19% 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

C.E. 115-Fluid Mechanics 2 

E.E. 233-A.C. Machinery 4 

E.E. 234-A. C. Machinery Lab. 

or E.E. 262— Communications 1 

E.E. 252-Electronics 4 

E.E. 261— Transmission Lines 3 

Electives 3 

G. 101-Eng'g. Society V 2 



Second Sem. Hr. 

E.E. 245-Electric Control 2 

E.E. 264— Radio Eng'g and 
E.E. 265-Radio Lab. 

or E.E. 282— Symmetrical Comp. 

and M.E. 222-Heat Engines 6 

E.E. 270-Elect. Ind. as Pub. Utility 3 

Electives 3 

G. 101— Eng*g. Society % 

G. 100— Inspection Trip 

G. 190-Business Law 3 



17V 2 



17i/ 2 



RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES 



Adv. Math, or Phvsics 3-6 

Mil. 105-108-Adv. Mil 1-6 

M.E. 223-Steam Pow. Plants 3 

M.E. 228-Eng'g Lab 2 

M. 201 -Adv. Kinetics 3 

Nontechnical t 1-6 






Ch.E. 238-Electrochem, Indc. . ..2-3 

E.E. 104-Illumination 2 

E.E. 280-Elec. Prob 1-6 

E.E. 284-Transients 3 

E.E. 285— Elect. Pow. Trans. & Disc. . 3 

E.E. 286— Industrial Control 3 

E.E. 287-Ind. Electronics 3 

E.E. 288— Antennas 3 

E.E. 299-Ultra-high-freq. Tech 3 

fSee page 254 for list of subjects. 

CURRICULA IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

The purpose of the course in mechanical engineering is to gi\e the student 
such mental equipment as will enable him to deal most effectively both technically 
and commercially with general engineering problems. All possible practice is given 
in the work that an engineer is ordinarily called on to do, but greater stress is laid 
on a thorough knowledge of those underlying fundamental principles and methods 
which are the foundation of all engineering professions. To this is added courses 
in economics, cost accounting, and business law. These furnish fundamental busi- 
ness training so essential for the engineer. Courses in speech, engineering society 
and participation in the student branch of the American Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers provides basic training in public address. 

The first and second years are devoted to those basic preparatory courses which 
are essential to the more technical courses which follow in the third and fourth 
years. This preparatory instruction supplies the requisite foundation in English, 
mathematics, chemistry, physics, statics, drafting, descriptive geometry, mechanism, 
and shop practice. 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 26: 



Fundamental drafting-room procedure is taught in the first year and this is 
supplemented by shop work, beginning in the summer following the first year. 
This is planned to give a knowledge of fundamental machine tools and methods of 
production, which, when combined with the study of mechanism, machine design, 
and power-plant design in the second, third, and fourth years, will enable the student 
to work out designs that are both practical in operation and economical to manu- 
facture. 

The work in pure mathematics is terminated at the end of the second year, and 
applications follow in recitation room courses in mechanism, statics, mechanics of 
materials, kinetics, dynamics, machine design, thermodynamics and other technical 
courses. Power engineering begins with the course in thermodynamics in the third 
year and is continued by the courses in heat engines, internal combustion engines, and 
power plant design. A sufficient amount of electrical engineering is given in the 
third and fourth years to enable the student to handle engineering operations involv- 
ing the simple electrical problems, and additional courses are available as electives. 

The engineering laboratories provide the student with practice in testing, 
operating, and caring for a large variety of machinery, including steam, air, gas, 
hydraulic, material-testing, internal combustion, and power-transmission machinery. 
The student becomes familiar with the various test codes of the recognized national 
societies. One-half day a week is devoted to this work during the last two years. 

Electives are provided in the fourth year that enable the student to specialize 
in the technical field or to acquire a broader cultural background. The student 
interested in the technical electives may specialize in the power field or in the indus- 
trial field in accordance with his natural inclination. Students interested in the 
power field pursue courses in steam turbines, heating, ventilating, and air condi- 
tioning. Students interested in the industrial field pursue courses in problems of 
organization and management of industries, motion and time study, quality and 
quantity control, and related subjects 

The curriculum is broad, highlv technical, and designed to meet the needs of 
young men interested in the scientific aspects of industrv. The young graduate 
ordinarilv enters a graduate apprenticeship in a public utility, manufacturing, or 
operating organization where opportunity is provided for his development in research, 
design, operation, sales, or administration, depending upon his interests and apti- 
tudes and upon the opportunities available. 

A student who desires a broader training in the liberal arts subjects than is 
provided in the regular four-year curriculum may take a combined bachelor of 
science and mechanical engineering course. By a careful selection of electives and 
proper sequence of registration, both degrees may be earned in five years. 

SUMMER SESSION FOLLOWING FIRST YEAR* 

Hr 

M.E. 1 1 —Machine Work 2 

M.E. 12-Machine Work 1 

M.E. 15— Welding, Forming and Heat Treatment 2 



SECOND YEAR 

hirst Sern. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Chem. 10— Quant. Analysis 2 M. 101— Statics 3 

Math. 107-Calculus 4 Math. 108-Calculus 4 

M. E. 16-Mfg. Processes 2 M. E. 25-Elem. of Mach. Desn 2 

M. E. 29-Mechanism 4 Mil. 4— Mil. or Air 2 

Mil. 3— Mil. or Air 2 Physics. 106— G. Physics 4 

Physics 105-G. Physics 4 Physics 108-G. Physics Lab 1 

Physics 107-G. Physics Lab 1 Speech 13-Public Spk 2 

19 18 

♦First Year Curriculum: See page 255. 



266 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



First Sem. 

Econ. 5— Fund, of Econ 3 

E. E. 102-Elements of E. E 4 

G. 101— Engineering Society i/ 2 

M. 102-Mech. of Materials 4 

M. 103— Materials Test Lab 1 

M. E. 122-Mechanical Lab 2 

M. E. 221 -Thermodynamics 3 



THIRD YEAR 
Hr. 



17i/ 2 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Acct. 5— Acct. for Engrs 2 

E. E. 103-Elements of E. E 4 

G. 101— Engineering Society y 2 

M. 104-Kinetics 3 

M. E. 105— Machine Constr 2 

M. E. 113— Machine Design 4 

M. E. 222-Heat Engines 3 

18i/ 2 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Ch. E. 150-Metallurgy 3 

C. E. 115-Fluid Mechanics 2 

C.E. 119-Fluid Mechanics Lab 1 

G. 101— Engineering Society % 

M. E. 123-Eng'g. Lab 2 

M. E. 203-Machine Design 4 

M. E. 223- Steam Pow. Plants 3 

Electives— (see below) 3 



Second Sem. Hr. 

E.E. 174-Ind. App. of Elec. Cont. . 3 

G. 101— Engineering Society y 2 

G. 190-Business Law 3 

M. E. 227— Pow. Plant Design 2 

M. E. 228-Eng'g. Lab 2 

M. E. 229-Int. Comb. Engines 3 

G. 100— Inspection Trip 

Electives— (see below) 6 



18i/ 2 



19i/ 2 



RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES 



M. E. 106— Shop Methods 2 or 3 

M. E. 124-Thesis 2 to 4 

M. E. 161— Precision Meas. & Gage 2 

M. E. 224-Steam Turbines 3 

M. E. 250-Heat. Vent. & Air Cond. 3 
ME. 270-lndustrial Lub 3 



Ch. E. 281-Fuels Technology ..2 to 3 

E.E. 243-Elect. Cal 2 

Flight Training 1 to 3 

Mil. 105-108-Adv. Military .... 1 to 6 
'Nontechnical 1 to 9 



|See page 254 for list of subjects. 

Curriculum in Industrial Engineering Option — Mechanical Engi- 
neering 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

Industrial engineering is a relatively new branch of engineering. The industrial 
engineer must combine his knowledge of engineering principles with everyday manu- 
facturing operations in order that the product be produced in larger and sufficient 
quantities at a minimum cost. The field of the industrial engineer is that of the 
process, production and cost expert engaged in planning, organizing, improving, 
managing, and operating the various processes for producing all kinds of manufac- 
tured products. 

The purpose of the industrial option is to provide training for those students who 
are interested in the managerial and technical activities in the engineering field. The 
option is basically engineering with its foundation in mathematics and the sciences, 
but the emphasis is upon the human factors and the economic aspects which are 
essential in engineering work. 

There are many new problems challenging industry. Industrial engineers are 
being called upon more and more to answer this challenge. Their job is to coor- 
dinate the man, machines, materials, and methods into a smooth-running organ- 
ization. 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 267 



The first and second years are devoted to basic courses in English, mathematics, 
chemistry, physics, statics, mechanism, drafting and shop practice which are essential 
to the more technical courses that follow in the third and fourth years. 

Industrial engineering includes motion and time study analysis for work simpli- 
fication and standardization, control of quality and quantity of production through 
modern mass production methods, establishment of cost standards and reduction of 
costs through improved methods of manufacture, and technical aspects of personnel 
management in such activities as job evaluation and wage incentives. 

The laboratories provide the student with practice in the various phases of 
industrial engineering. Facilities are also available for research and development of 
methods and procedures of manufacture and control. 

Besides giving the engineering fundamentals, the industrial option provides for 
basic course work in the fields of mechanical and electrical engineering. The studies 
prescribed within the option provide for intensive training in the various branches of 
industrial engineering. The specialization courses starting in the junior year are 
planned for progressive instruction in the principles and techniques of industrial 
engineering as practiced in industry. Additional course work is provided in the field 
of statistics. Statistics as a tool in industrial engineering has been increasing steadily, 
its greatest contribution in recent years being in the control of quality of manufactured 
products by statistical method. 

The department annually sponsors an Industrial Engineering Conference. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to attend the meetings and thus are afforded an opportunity 
of hearing opinions expressed by men of national recognition. 

West Virginia has many types of industries in which industrial engineers may be 
profitably employed. Greater efficiency in operations as well as the expansion of in- 
dustrial activities in the state will maintain the need for graduates in this ever devel- 
oping field. 

SUMMER SESSION FOLLOWING FIRST YEAR* 

Hrs. 

M.E. 1 1— Machine Work 2 

M.E. 7— Welding and Heat Treatment 1 

Speech 13— Public Speaking 2 



SECOND YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Econ. 1— Prin. of Econ 3 Econ. 2— Prin. of Econ 3 

Math. 107-Calculus 4 Math. 108-Calculus 4 

M.E. 16-Mfg. Processes 2 M. 101-Statics 3 

M.E. 30— Industrial Org 2 M.E. 27— Mechanism 2 

Mil. 3-Mil. or Air 2 Mil. 4— Mil. or Air 2 

Phys. 105-G. Physics 4 Phys. 106-G. Physics i 

Phys. 107-G. Physics Lab 1 Phys. 108-G. Physics Lab 1 



18 19 



THIRD YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. Second San. Hr. 

Acct. 1-Prin. of Acct 3 Acct. 2— Prin. of Acct 3 

G. 101-Eng'g Society i/ 2 Ch.E. 150-Gen. Metallurgy 3 

M. 102— Mech. of Matls 4 Eng. 126-Adv. Composition 2 

M.E. 122-Mech. Lab 2 G. 101-Eng'g Society i/ 9 

M.E. 140-Motion & Time Study 3 M. 104-Kinetics 3 

M.E. 144-Eng'g Statistics 3 M.E. 142-Production Control 3 

M.E. 221-Thermodynamics 3 M.E. 222-Heat Engines 3 

M.E. 286— Eng'g Economy 2 

18i/ 2 19i/ 2 

*First Year Curriculum: See page 255. 



268 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



FOURTH YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Son. H) 

Econ. 115— Labor Problems 3 C.E. 115— Fluid Mechanics 2 

G. 101-Eng'g Society i/ 2 E.E. 110-Elem. of E.E 5 

G. 109-Business Law 3 G. 101-Eng'g Society 



M.E. 210-Tool Design 3 M.E. 292-Plant Layout & Desn 2 

M.E. 288-Job Eval. & Wage Inc 3 M.E. 294-St. Mfg. Costs 3 

M.E. 290-Ind. Statistics 2 Psy. 115-Psychology of End 3 

Electives 3 Electives . 3 

17i/ 2 181/g 

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES 

Econ. 1 14— Corporation Finance 3 M.E. 250— Heat, Vent. & Air Cond. . . 3 

E.M. 1 17-Industrial Safety Eng'g ... 3 M.E. 270-Industrial Lub 3 

M.E. 211— Ind. Eng'g Prob 3 Mil. 105-108-Adv. Mil. for Engrs. . . 1-6 

Nontechnical 1-6 

THE SCHOOL OF MIXES CURRICULA 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Engineering of Mines. 

1. Four-year curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering 
of Mines, with options in coal mining and in geological, petroleum, and natural gas 
engineering. 

2. Combined science and engineering curricula extending oyer five or more 
years leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Science in 
Engineering of Mines. 

Mining Engineering deals with the exploitation and extraction of minerals from 
within the earth. The role of the mining engineer in this field is quite diversified 
and there are opportunities for specialization in prospecting, engineering, production, 
beneficiation and utilization. Therefore, the mining engineer must not only be 
trained in mining and geology, but also in the principles of civil, electrical, and 
mechanical engineering as applied to the mining industry. 

The first two years of the curricula in Mining Engineering are devoted to thorough 
training in the principles of mathematics, physics, chemistry, geology, English, and 
speech. These are supplemented by courses in mechanical drawing and surface and 
underground suryeying. 

At the beginning of the third year, two options are provided. The student may 
choose to enter the field of coal mining engineering or geological, oil and gas 
engineering. 

Summer employment is usually arranged for students desiring it and such work 
is encouraged. 

Mixing Engineering: Coal Mining Option 

In the Coal Mining Option (beginning in the student's third year) , the curriculum 
includes a stud\ of the geology and classification of coals; prospecting; explosives and 
blasting; shaft sinking and tunneling: mining systems; haulage; hoisting and pumping; 
and the chemical analysis of coals. 

During the fourth year, the study continues with courses in the principles of 
mineral beneficiation and preparation of coal for market; the utilization of mining 
machinery, with particular reference to electrical equipment; mine gases and the 
ventilation of mines; mine management, with consideration to economic, social, gov- 
ernmental, labor, and financial problems which arise in the operation of a mining 
enterprise; and an engineering approach to the problem of safety in industry. Courses 
in the projection of mine workings and the design of preparation plants are required 
throughout the fourth year. 

The course in heat and power engineering introduces the student to steam 
and internal combustion power conversion, and the course in metallurgy acquaints 



THE COLLEGE OE ENGINEERING 



269 



him with the processes used in the manufacture of iron and steel. Thorough ground- 
work in engineering principles is acquired in the courses in mechanics which are 
given in conjunction with courses in electrical engineering and structural engineering. 

Courses in economics, accounting, and business law furnish fundamental business 
training so essential to the engineer. 

For those desirous of further specialization, electives in the fields of geology, fuel 
technology, metallurgy, industrial engineering, and mining economics are offered. 

Local coal fields, mines, and preparation plants are utilized extensively for instruc- 
tion and field work. 



SECOND YEAR' 



First Sem. Hr. 

Physics 105— G. Physics 4 

Physics 107— G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 107-Calculus 4 

Mil. 3-Mil. or Air 2 

Chem. 10— Quant. Analysis 2 

Geol. 1— General Geology 3 

Geol. 2— General Geology Lab 1 

Speech 13— Effective Speaking 2 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Physics 106-G. Physics 4 

Physics 108-G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 108-Calculus 4 

Mil. 4— Mil. or Air 2 

M. 101-Statics 3 

E.M. 103-Mine Surveying 3 

E.M. 106— Mineralogy 2 



19 
E.M. 102— Summer Mine Surveying (six weeks) 



THIRD YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

E.E.I 02— Elements of E.E 4 

M. 102— Mech. of Materials 4 

M. 103-Materials Test Lab 1 

E.M. Ill— Intro. Mining 2 

E.M. 107— Mining Methods 4 

M.E. 220-Heat and Power Eng'g. .. 3 

E.M. 109-Coal Analysis Lab 1 

G. 101— Engineering Society i/ 2 



Second Sem. Hr. 

E.E. 103-Elements of E.E 4 

M. 104-Kinetics 3 

E.M. 212— Advanced Mining 4 

Ch.E. 150-Metallurgy . . . . 3 

C.E. 115— Fluid Mechanics 2 

C.E. 119— Fluid Mechanics Lab 1 

G. 101— Engineering Society i/ 2 



19i/ 2 



17% 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

C.E. 122— Structural Eng'g . . 3 

E.M. 220-Mine Design 2 

E.M. 213-Mine Ventilation 3 

Econ. 5— Fund, of Econ 3 

E.M. 217— Coal Preparation 4 

G. 101— Engineering Society 1/2 

Electives— (see below) 3 



Second Sem. Hr. 

G. 190-Business Law 3 

E.M. 223— Mine Management 2 

E.M. 221-Mine Design 3 

E.M. 222-Mine Equip. & Mach 2 

E.M. 215-Ind. Safety Eng'g 2 

Acct. 5— Acounting for Engineers . . 2 

G. 101— Engineering Society i/> 

G. 100— Inspection Trip 

Electives . . (see below) 3 



isy 2 



17V 2 



*First Year Curriculum: See page 255. 



270 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES IN THE COAL MINING OPTION 

Hr. Hr. 

E.M. 208-Geo. Survey 1 M.E. 140-Motion and Time Study.. 3 

E.M. 214— Coal Prod., Cost M.E. 144— Engineering Statistics 3 

Control and Economics 3 Geoi. 172— Economic Geol 3 

Ch.E. 253-Non. Fer. Met 2 Geol. 3-Historical Geol 3 

E.E. 274— Ind. Applications Geol. 4— Hist. Geol. Lab 1 

of Electricity 3 Geol. 170— Nat. Resources and 

C.E. 206— Concrete Const 3 Geology of West Virginia 3 

Ch.E. 281 -Fuel Technology 3 Geol. 275— Coal Geology 4 

Ch.E. 282-Fuel Technology 3 Mil. 105-108-Adv. Military or Air 1-6 

E.M. 218— Adv. Mineral Preparation . 3 fNontechnical 1-6 

E.M. 219— Adv. Mining Methods for 

Vein Deposits 3 

E.M. 226— Adv. Mining Equipment 

Applications 3 

fSee page 254 for list of subjects. 

Mining Engineering: Geological, Petroleum, and Natural Gas 
Option 

This option is planned to meet the needs of the engineer specializing in 
petroleum and natural-gas engineering and for engineers interested in the geologi- 
cal aspects of mining rather than the actual operation of a mining property. 
There is a growing demand for the so-called mining geologist who has had a 
thorough training in the fundamentals of engineering in general and of mining 
engineering in particular and is especially qualified to work out the detailed 
geological features of mining properties and to make reports on them. This is 
particularly true in the case of oil and gas companies, where accurate knowledge 
in advance of actual drilling operations is of the greatest importance in the 
economical development of the field. Besides the opportunities offered by mining 
companies, many of our railroads maintain a corps of geologists while the several 
states and federal government are continually carrying on geological investigations. 
This course also offers an excellent preparation for those who propose to do 
graduate work. 

Particular emphasis is placed on the development, production, distribution, 
and utilization of natural gas and petroleum. This is an engineering field essential 
to modern industry offering many opportunities for the technically trained stu- 
dent. Local production fields, compressor stations, and refineries coupled with 
new equipment facilities offer many unique advantages in this field of engineering. 

In the third year the course differs from the coal-mining option in that 
organic chemistry, petroleum, natural gas, and geological courses are substituted 
for the courses in coal mining. A course in field geology in which the student 
prepares ? geological map and a complete report on an assigned area enables 
him to apply the geological knowledge received in various courses. An introductory 
course in geophysics acquaints the student with methods and calculations used 
in prospecting for oil and mineral deposits and in field practice with the instru- 
ments used. The fundamentals of mining and metallurgy are studied in the third 
year as well. I he study of oil and gas geology treats of the origin, properties, 
distribution, and mode of accumulation of oil and gas, and familiarizes the stu- 
dent with all available sources of information on this subject. The courses in 
oil and gas production, core-analysis laboratory, and oil-refining deal with the 
subjects of the chemical and physical properties of petroleum and natural gas, 
their extraction and subsequent treatment, the valuation of oil and gas properties, 
reports on them, and the actual testing in the laboratory of various oils, oil shales, 
and natural gas. The problems of natural-gas measurement and distribution are 
particularly stressed in conjunction with a gas laboratory where gas measure- 
ment and regulation equipment is calibrated and used. 

A thorough grounding in the fundamentals of business is afforded by the 
courses in economics, accounting, and business law. 






THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



271 



First Sem. 



SECOND YEAR* 



Hr. Second St m. 



Physics 105-G. Physics 4 

Physics 107-G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Mil. 3-Mil. or Air 2 

E.M. 103— Mine Surveying 3 

Geol. 1-General Geol 3 

Geol. 2-Gen. Geol. Lab 1 



Hr. 



Physics 106— G. Physics 4 

Physics 108— G. Physics Lab 1 

Math. 108-Calculus 4 

Mil. 4— Mil. or Air 2 

E.M. 106— Mineralogy 2 

Chem. 15 Quant. Analysis 3 

M. 101— Statics 3 



18 



19 



THIRD YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Chem. 233— Organic Chem 4 

Geol. 3— Historical Geol 3 

Geol. 4-Hist. Geol. Lab 1 

M. 102— Mech. of Materials 4 

M. 103-Materials Test. Lab 1 

Ch.E. 150-Metallurgy 3 

E.M. 201— Oil Field Development . . 2 

G. 101— Engineering Society y 2 



Second Sem. Hr. 

M. 104-Kinetics 3 

Speech 13— Effective Speaking 2 

C.E. 119- Fluid Mechanics Lab 1 

E.M. 204-Oil and Gas Production . . 4 

Ch.E. 186— Oil Lab 1 

C.E. 115— Fluid Mechanics 2 

Acct. 5— Accounting for Engineers . . 2 

G. 190— Business Law 3 

G. 101— Engineering Society i/ 2 



18i/ 2 



i8y 2 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Econ. 5— Fund, of Econ 3 

Ch.E. 286-Petroleum Tech 2 

E.E. 110-Elements of E.E 5 

Geol. 151 -Structural Geol 3 

E.M. 205-Gas Meas. Eng'g 2 

E.M. 216— Petroleum Eng'g. Design.. 2 

G. 101— Engineering Society i/ 2 

Electives (see below) 2 

19^ 



Second Sem. Hr. 

M.E. 220-Heat and Pow'r. Eng'g... 3 

E.M. 208-Geol. Surveying 1 

Geol. 272-Petroleum Geol 3 

Geol. 161-Field Geol 3 

Ch.E. 282— Fuel Technology 3 

G. 101— Engineering Society j/ 2 

Electives (see below) 4 

G. 100— Inspection Trip 

ny 2 



RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES IN PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS OPTION 



E.M. 212— Advanced Mining 4 

Mil. 105-108-Adv. Military or Air 1-6 
E.M. 206— Elem. of Geophysical 

Prospecting 2 or 3 

Econ. 140— Labor Problems 3 

E.M. 207-Intro. Seismology 1 

Ch.E. 281-Fuel Technology 3 

Eng. 126— Adv. Composition 2 

M.E. 229-Int. Comb. Engines 3 



*First Year Curriculum: See page 255. 
fSee page 254 for list of subjects. 



E.M. 214-Coal Production. Cost 

Control and Economics 3 

E.M. 215-Ind. Safety Eng'g 2 

C.E. 206-Reinforced Concrete 3 

M.E. 270— Industrial Lubrication ... 3 

Geol. 172-Econ. Geol. (Non-Met.) . . 3 

M.E. 229-Int. Comb. Engines 3 

Geol. 170— Natural Resources and 

Geology of West Virginia 3 

Geol. 172-Econ. Geol. (Non-Met.) . . 3 

fNontechnical 1-6 



272 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



FIVE YEAR CURRICULA 

Degree*: Bachelor of Science in conjunction with a Degree in Engineering or Mining 
Engineering 

These curricula are designed to meet the needs of students who wish a 
broader training in liberal-arts subjects than is provided in a four-vear curriculum. 

(A) Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science 

Subject Hours 

The requirements in the first three years of any four-year engineering 

curriculum* 7 116i 8 -119i s 

Additional economics (group requirements of 6 hours) 1-3 

One foreign language 12 

Elective from one of the following groups: 6 

(1) English, journalism, speech; (2) foreign language; 

(3) history; (4) political science; (5) philosophy and sociology; 

(6) business administration. 

(B) Requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering or Engineering 
of Mines to be conferred upon completion of the fifth year: 

The work outlined for the fourth year in the department in which 

the first degree was taken 37-33 

Total for five years 173i 8 -175 18 

Total for five years 136i 8 -140i s 

GRADUATE CURRICULA 

Graduate work leading to the degiee of Master of Science in Engineering is 
offered in all departments. In certain departments courses leading to the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy are also offered. The student who plans to pursue 
graduate work is directed to the courses as outlined in the Graduate School section 
of the Catalog. 

SPECIAL ENGINEERING CURRICULA 

1. Elective Groups for Students in Other Colleges. Candidates for degrees other 
than engineering degrees and special students in any department of the Univ- 
ersity are permitted to elect subjects in the College of Engineering and the School 
of Slines, provided, in each case, they have had the subjects specified as pre- 
requisites. Students who wish to take a general classical or scientific course of 
study before taking the engineering curriculum are advised to carry their mathe- 
matics as far as called for by the engineering curriculum, and to take some of 
their elective work in the College of Engineering. 

2. Partial Curriculum. Students who have not the time or are otherwise 
unable to take full curriculum will be allowed to take a special or partial cur- 
riculum, consisting of such studies as they are prepared to take, provided such 
curriculum shall have been approved by the adviser. For further information see 
statement of requirements for admission as special students. 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 

The University confers the following professional degrees: Aeronautical Engineer 
(A.E.), Chemical Engineer (C.h.E.), Civil Engineer (C.C.), Electrical Engineer (E.E.), 
Mechanical Engineer (M.E.) . and Engineer of Mines (E.M.), upon graduates of the 
College of Engineering and of the School of Mines of West Virginia University on the 

i7Students maintaining- a grade point average of 2.5 or over may be granted 
separately the Bachelor of Science Degree; otherwise the conferring of this 
degree will be deferred until the student has satisfied the requirements of the 
engineering degree. 

iSThese figures include the present University requirements for 8 hours .in 
military science and 2 hours in physical education. 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 273 



oasis of practical experience and study in absentia, the presentation of a thesis, and 
oral final examination. 

To be eligible, a candidate for a professional degree must have been in active 
practice of his profession for at least five years since receiving his first degree, 
and must have been, in responsible charge of important work for at least two years. 

Application for registration as a candidate for a degree should be made not later 
than October 1 in the year in which the degree is expected. Detailed regulations and 
registration blanks may be obtained from the Dean of the College of Engineering or 
the Director of the School of Mines. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



"■A 



—course may be taken as undergraduate work by students in colleges other than the 
College of Engineering. 

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Seltzer and Assistant Professor Ulrich. 
Under graduaie Division _ li 

201. Elementary Aerodynamics. I. 3 hr. PR:M. 101. Physical properties of air, 
airfoils, effect of planform, induced drag, parasite drag. Engine characteristics, 
propellers. Airplane performance at sea level and altitude. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Seltzer 

202. Aerodynamics. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 253, A.E. 201, M.E. 221 and C.E. 115. 
Steady flow of incompressible and compressible fluids, dimensional analysis, 
viscous flow. Stream functions of two dimensional ideal flows, boundary 
layer theory. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Seltzer 

203. Applied Aerodynamics. II. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 202. Chordwise and spanwise air-load 
distribution for plain wings, wings with aerodynamic and geometric twist, wings 
with deflected flaps, and wings with ailerons deflected. Section induced drag 
characteristics. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Seltzer 

205. Experimental Aerodynamics. II. 2 hr. PR: A.E. 202. Wind tunnel testing 
methods and equipment and wind tunnel boundary corrections. Experi- 
ments include: Yaw characteristics of Pitot-static tubes, pressure distribution 
on wings and circular cylinders, boundary layer determination, determin- 
ation of wind tunnel turbulence, force tests of wings and airplane models, 
stability and performance determination and corrections for scale effect. 1 hr. 
lee, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Seltzer 

207. Aerodynamic Design. I. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 209. Preliminary design of aircraft. 
Inboard profiles, design, weight and balance calculations; three view drawings. 
Airplanes are designed to specification with respect to performance and stability. 
1 hr. lee, 6 hr. lab. Staff 

208. Flight Testing. II. 2 hr. PR: A.E. 209. Flight test theory and practice* 
Data on stability and performance taken in Cessna 170A airplane. Flight test 
data reduction practice. 1 hr. lee. 3 hr. lab x Mr. Seltzer 

209. Aircraft Performance and Stability. II. -4— trr. PR: A.E. 201 and A.E. 202 

for cone.) Effect of superchargers and constant speed propellers on airplane 
performance. Performance analysis by chart methods. Gas turbine-jet air- 
plane performance. Helicopter performance. 4 hr. lee. Mr. Seltzer 

210. Basic Aircraft Structures. II. 3 hr. PR: M. 102 and M. 103. Design of 
elementary structural forms, truss analysis and use of thin sheet in aircraft. 
Deflections by Virtual Work. Least Work and Williot Diagram. 3 hr. lee, 

Mr. Ulrich 

211. Redundant Aircraft Structures. I 3 hr. PR: A.E. 210 or equivalent. Con- 
tinuation of A.E. 210. Analysis and design of statically indeterminate 
structures used in aircraft. Design for achieving high strength/weight ratios. 
3 hr. lee Mr. Ulrich 



274 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



212. Applied Aircraft Design. II. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 207, A.E. 209, A.E. 211. Structural 
design of airframe members to C.A.A. requirements. The work is performed 
on the airplane designed in A.E. 207 during the previous semester. Layout 
and detail design of specified components are required. 6 hr. lab. Staff 

213. Aircraft Structures Laboratory. II. 1 hr. PR: A.E. 211. Strength tests 
of aircraft materials, airplane center of gravity determination, static test of 
airplane ribs, bending and torsion of shell structures, inspection of Magnaflux, 
compression tests of thin-walled structures. 3 hr. lab. Mr. Ulrich 

214. Advanced Aircraft Structures. II. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 211. Incomplete tension 
fields, critical loads, torsional column failure, instability of flat sheets, cylin- 
drical structures. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Ulrich 

216. Aircraft Detail Design. S. 2 hr. PR: M.E. 26. Detail drawing of airplane com- 
ponents. Use of Aircraft Standards and drafting procedures. Development 
of contoured surfaces and projections. Methods of production and fabrication. 
6 hr. lab. Mr. Ulrich 

217. Aircraft Structural Design. I. 3 hr. PR: M. 102. Analysis and detail design 
of simple fittings, beams, welded structures, forgings, castings. Methods of 
production and fabrication. 1 hr. lee, 6 hr. lab. Mr. Ulrich 

218. Aeroelasticity. I. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 210. The study of vibrating systems of single 
degree and multiple degrees of freedom, flutter theory and modes of vibration, 
wing torsional divergence and aileron reversal. 3 hr. lee. Mr. Ulrich 

220. Seminar. I, II. 2-6 hr. PR: Senior standing and permission of the instructor. 
Special material and projects. Stafl 

222. Aircraft Propulsion. II. 2 hr. PR: A.E. 201 and M. 102. Momentum Theory 
The Simple Blade Element Theory. Modifications of Blade Element Theory 
Effect of blade shape, tip speed on propeller efficiency. Construction of con- 
stant speed propellers. Gas turbine-jet power plants. Ram-jets. Liquid and 
solid fuel rockets. 2 hr. lee. Mr. Seltzer 

280, 281. Aeronautical Problems. I, II. 1-3 hr. Upper division and graduate. Stafl 

299. Thesis. I, II. 2-6 hr. PR: Senior standing and permission of the instructor. Stafl 



AVIATION 

Professor Seltzer and Flight Supervisor Henry; Flight Instructors Bennett and Bishop. 

Undergraduate Division 

*170. Aviation Ground School. I, II, S. 2 hr. Nomenclature of aircraft, civil air 

* regulations, navigation, meteorology, and aircraft engines. Staff 

* 171 . Flight Training. I, II, S. 1 hr. Beginning flight instruction and training 

consisting of 20 hours of flight time. The student will have approximately 
12 hours of dual and 8 hours of solo flying in this course. Special flight fee 
$100, payable at registration. Staff 

*172. Flight Training. I, II, S. 1 hr. PR: A.E. 171. Continuation of A.E. 171, con- 
sisting of 20 hours flight time. This course, together with A.E. 171, should 
enable a student to obtain the required flight time and necessary experience to 
prepare him for a C.A.A. private pilot's examination. Special flight fee of 
SI 00, payable at registration. Stafl 

*173. Advanced Flight Training. I, II, S. 1 hr. PR: A.E. 172. Twenty hours flight 
training of an advanced nature, including radio and instrument navigation 
and procedures and advanced cross-country flying. Link Instrument Trainer 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 275 



instruction may be taken concurrently. Flight instruction given in Cessna 
airplanes. Special flight fee of $100, payable at registration. Staff 

* 1 75 . Advanced Flight Training. I, II, S. 1 hr. PR: A.E. 173. Continuation of A.E. 

173. Consisting of 20 hours of flight time. Special flight fee of $100, payable 
at registration. Staff 

* 176. Advanced Flight Training. I, II, S. 1 hr. PR: A.E. 175. Continuation of A.E. 

175. Consisting of 20 hours of flight time. Special flight fee of $100, payable 
at registration. Staff 

* 177. Advanced Flight Training. I, II, S. 1 hr. PR. A.E. 176. Consisting of 20 hours 

of flight time. Special flight fee of $100, payable at registration. Staff 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Longhouse and Instructor Reid. / ,' ' 

Undergraduate Division 

Ag.E. 

100. Farm Structures. II. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 122. Structural design and functional re- 
quirements of farm service buildings. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Longhouse 

110. Application of Electricity to Agriculture. II.-t?-4w. PR: E.E. 103. Economic 
application of electric light, heat, and power in Agriculture. 1 hr. rec, 3 hr. 
lab. Mr. Reid 

> 140. Soil and Water Conservation. I. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 115. Engineering principles 
and practices in the conservation, utilization, and management of soil and water 
resources. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Reid 

v / 

190. Farm Machinery. II. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 203. Construction, operation, adjustment, 
and testing of farm machines. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Reid 

230. Farm Power. I. 4 hr. PR: M.E. 222. Not open to students who have had M.E. 
229. Fundamental theories underlying design and operation of internal- 
combustion engines used in agriculture. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Longhouse 

Graduate Divisioyi 

320, 321. Special Topics. I, II, S. 1-6 hr. (For the Master's Degree, Special Topics 
ordinarily may count 2 to 4 hours; maximum credit, 6 hours.) Staff 

397. Research. I and II. 1-6 hr. Staff 

CHEMICAL, METALLURGICAL, AND CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

Professors Koehler and Simons; Associate Professors Fairbanks and P. R. Jones; 

Instructors Crewe, Galli, and Harvey; Lecturer Sebastian. 

Undergraduate Division 

Ch. E. 

100. Chemical Engineering Operations. I, II, S. 2 hr. Primarily for engineering 
students. An introduction to the various operations and equipment used 
in the chemical engineering industries. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Crewe 

*140. Chemical Engineering Calculations. I. 2 hr. PR: Chem. 2 and Math. 3. 
Industrial stoichiometry; industrial calculations involving material and energy 
balances. Mr. Koehler 

Um. General Metallurgy. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Phys, 106. Process and physical metal- 
lurgy; heat treating; alloys; fabrication and instrumentation. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Fairbanks 



276 CURRICULA AND COURSES 






3 DZSQXIPI/Od o^r ~2<&d 
*160. Elements of Ceramics. SI, SII. % hr. Fu ndamental s of clay working. 6 hr. lab. - 

IA6 Mr. Jones 

186. Oil Laboratory. II. 1 hr. PR: Chem 6 or 15. Standard petroleum lab- 
oratory testing methods and procedures. Primarily for students taking 
Petroleum and Natural-gas Option. 3 hr. lab. Mr. Galli 

*200. Chemical Engineering Operations. I, II, S. 2 hr.. Similar to Ch. E. 100 
but primarily for chemistry majors. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Crewe 

205. Principles of Chemical Engineering. I. 5 hr. PR or cone: Chem. 260 
Ch.E. 100 or 200. Theory and application of the unit operations of chemical 
engineering. 3 hr. rec, 6 hr. calc. lab. Mr. Simons and Mr. Galli 

207. Principles of Chemical Engineering. II. 5 hr. Continuation of Ch.E. 205. 
3 hr. rec, 6 hr. calc. lab. Mr. Simons and Mr. Galli 

211, 212. Chemical Engineering Laboratory. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ch.E. 207. Experi- 
mental work in the unit operations; practice in writing engineering reports. 
6 hr. lab. Mr. Crewe and Staff 

224. Unit Organic Processes. II. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 238 and Ch.E. 207. Unit 
processes involved in the synthetic organic chemicals industries. 3 hr. rec 

Mr. Simons 

*234. "f nonoimi c Chemical Technology. I, II, S. 2 hr. A survey of the manufacturing 
procedures employed in the inorganic process industries, including theory, 
equipment and economics. 2 hr rec. Mr. Galli 






N 235. OROANie Chemical Technology. I, II, S. 2 hr. Similar to Ch.E. 234 but 
dealing with organic process industries. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Galli 

*238. E-fcEeTROG»KM4€AL Industries. I, II. 2 or 3 hr. PR: Chem. 2 and PR or cone: 
E.E. 110 or Chem. 260. Industrial electrochemical processes and equipment; 
primary and secondary cells; manufacture of chemicals; electroplating, electro- 
refining and electrometallurgy; electric furnaces, corrosion; electrostatics; 
electronics. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Koehler and Mr. Crewe 

242. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. I. 3 hr. PR: Ch.E. 140 and Chem. 
261. Applications of themodynamics to chemical engineering; relationships 
between the fundamental and thermodynamic functions; thermodynamic trans- 
formations. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Harvey 

243. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. II. 3 hr. PR: Ch.E. 242. Appli 
cations of thermodynamics to non-ideal gases; construction of thermodynamic 
diagrams; mechanical work in non-ideal systems; fugacity, activity, and chem- 
ical potential; chemical reaction equilibria; physical equilibria. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Harvey 

251. Metallography 4? aboratoe/v. I, II. 2 hr. Preparation of ferrous and non 
ferrous samples for micro-photography; heat treating, carburization; physical 
testing and X-ray studies of metals. 6 hr. lab. Mr. Fairbanks 

252. Ferrous Metallurgy. I. 2 hr. PR: Ch.E. 150. The making, shaping, alloying, 
and heat treating of steel. 2 hr. rec Mr. Fairbanks 

253. Nonferrols Metallurgy. II. 2 hr. PR: Ch.E. 150. Nature of ores, benefication, 
smelting, refining, alloying, uses, heat treating, and properties of the major 
nonferrous metals. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Fairbanks 

255. Metallurgical Calculations. II. 2 hr. PR: Ch.E. 150. Material and heat bal- 
ances, charge, heat transfer and power calculations, and cost analysis. 2 hr. rec. 

Mr. Fairbanks 

25£: — Aiklkam Structural Materials. I. 2 hr. PR: A.E. 211. Heavy and light aHeys, 
plastics, fabrics, woods, and other major materials used in production of air 
craft i — a h r . f ee. Mr. Fairbanks 






THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 277 



:amtcs. I, II. 3 hr. PR: (hem. 15. Ceramic raw materials, body 
preparation, drying and firing. 2 hr. rec. 3 hr. lab. Mr. Jones 

261. Ceramics. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Ch.E. 260. Detailed study of structural clay products, 
porcelains, chinas, and earthenwares. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Jones 

262. Refractories. I. 2 hr. PR: Ch.E. 260. Manufacture, properties, uses, of 
standard tests and phase diagrams of refractory materials. 2 hr. rec. 

Mr. Koehler and Mr. Jones 

*263. Glass. II. 2 hr. PR or cone: Chem. 15. Physical and chemical properties of 

glass. Methods of analysis of glass and raw materials. Theory and practice 

of manufacture. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Jones 

264. Enamels, Glazes, and Colors. II. 3 hr. PR or cone: Ch.E. 261. Preparation and 
application of enamels, glazes, and colors. Physical tests and detailed study of 
problems. 1 hr. rec, 6 hr. lab. Mr. Jones 

*267 . — Practical Potter v. SI. g hi. In. lab. Cuuiiuudiiun uf 100. Mr, Jones 

^26& — Pottluy AMU Clkamil Akl. 311. 2 111. 111 lab. Mf. Jones 

272. Chemical Engineering Design. I. 3 hr. PR: Ch.E. 207, M. 102. C.E. 115 
and Econ. 30. Design of process equipment from economic, chemical and 
engineering considerations. Study of plant location and layout. 2 hr. rec, 
3 hr. lab. Mr. Simons and Mr. Galli 

273. Chemical Engineering Design. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Ch.E. 272. 2 hr. rec, 
3 hr. lab. //t - ^ r - Simons and Mr. Galli 

? - 280. Chemical^ Problems. 1.-6 hr. For junior, senior, and graduate students. Staff 

*281. Fuel Technology. I. 2 or 3 hr. PR: Chem. 15. Technology of solid fuels. 
Classification and reserves. Analysis and testing. Origin, occurrence, com- 
position and properties. Mining and methods of manufacture. Principles 
of carbonization, gasification and combustion. Fuel engineering calculations. 
Nucleonic fuels and their use in nuclear power plants. Economic aspects. 
2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Sebastian and Mr. Jones 

*282. Fuel Technology. II. 2 or 3 hr. PR: Ch.E. 281. Technology of gaseous 
and liquid fuels. Classification and reserves. Analysis and testing. Origin, 
occurrence, composition and properties. Methods of production. Natural 
gas and petroleum. Refining and cracking processes. Manufactured fuel 
gases. Storage and transmission. Combustion processes and burner designs 
Gasification and combustion calculations. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

Mr. Sebastian and Mr. Crewe 

284. Industrial Instrumentation and Control. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Math. 108. 
Discussion of process characteristics, theory and application of measuring 
means. Theory, modes and application of automatic control. Selection and 
characteristics of final control elements. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Koehler and Mr. Galli 

286. Petroleum Technology. I. 2 hr. PR: Chem 233. Discussion of crude oil 
desalting, distillation, natural gasoline recovery, thermal and catalytic crack- 
ing, solvent refining, dewaxing, filtration, blending and compounding of 
petroleum products. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Galli 

297, 298. Thesis. I, II. 2-5 hr. A problem in chemical engineering or industrial 
chemistry is selected for investigation. A carefully prepared report is required. 
Open only to qualified seniors. 6-15 hr. lab. Staff 

Graduate Division 
300. Seminar. I, II, S. 1-6 hr. Hours to be arranged. Staff 

304. Advanced Unit Operations: Diffusion. I, II, S. 2-5 hr. PR: Ch.E. 207 and 
243. Advanced theory and laboratory work in the diffusional operations in- 
cluding absorption and extraction in their various aspects. 2 hr. rec, 0-9 hr. lab. 

Mr. Simons 



278 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



305. Advanced Unit Operations: Drying. I, II, S. 2-5 hr. PR: Ch.E. 207. Ad- 
vanced study of psychrometric principles and the various drying theories. 
2 hr. rec, 0-9 hr. lab. Mr. Koehler 

306. Advanced Unit Operations: Heat Transfer. I, II, S. 2-5 hr. PR: Ch.E. 207. 
Same as Ch.E. 304, but dealing with heat transfer, evaporation, and crystalliz- 
ation. 2 hr. rec, 0-9 hr. lab. Mr. Simons 

307. Advanced Unit Operations: Distillation. I, II, S. 2-5 hr. PR: Ch.E. 207. 
Advanced study of vaporization principles of separation of liquid mixtures, 
steam, batch, continuous, azeotropic, extractive and molecular distillation. 
2 hr. rec, 0-9 hr. lab. Mr. Simons 

323, 324. Advanced Unit Processes. I, II, S. 2-5 hr. PR: Chem. 238 and Ch.E. 207. 
Advanced study of the unit processes with application to process development. 

2 hr. rec, 0-9 hr. lab. Mr. Simons 

*340. Phase Equilibria. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: Chem. 261. Interpretation, construction 
and applications of one, two, and three-component diagrams; applications 
of the phase rule. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Koehler 

344. Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Ch.E. 
243. Review of thermodynamic transformations, use of Jacobians; advanced 
applications to chemical and physical equilibria; development and appli- 
cations of phase rule; equilibria diagrams for non-ideal systems; determin- 
ation and use of activity coefficients; methods of estimating thermodynamic 
functions; introduction to statistical mechanics. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Harvey 

345. Chemical Engineering Kinetics. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Ch.E. 243. Applications 
of chemical kinetics to industrial reactor design; review of physical chemical 
principles; theories of reactions, design of batch and flow reactors; theories 
of catalysis; reaction mechanisms; data interpretation; applications to design 
of catalytic reactors; effects of diffusion on catalytic reactions. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Harvey 
*350. Advanced Physical Metallurgy. I. 3 hr. PR: Ch.E. 150. Includes crystall- 
ization, plastic deformation and constitutional diagrams. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Fairbanks 
*351. Advanced Metallography Laboratory. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Ch.E. 251. Includes 
a study of slip bands, precipitation hardening, isothermal transformation of 
austenite, hardenability, powder metallurgy and crystallography. 9 hr. lab. 

Mr. Fairbanks 

352. Advanced Ferrous Metallurgy. I. 3 hr. PR: Ch.E. 252. Recent developments 
in making, shaping, alloying, and heat treating of steel. 3 hr. rec Mr. Fairbanks 

353. Advanced Nonferrous Metallurgy. II. 3 hr. PR: Ch.E. 253. Recent develop- 
ments in beneficiation, reduction, refining, alloying, and heat treating of 
nonferrous metals. 3 hr. rec. *? J Mr. Fairbanks 

/■' 
355. Advanced Metallurgical Calculations. II. 3/ hr. PR: Ch.E. 243. Com- 
prehensive problems on metallurgical processes. Mr. Fairbanks 

360. Advanced Ceramic Technology. I, II. 3 hi. PR: Ch.E. 161. Special ceramic 
bodies including high temperature porcelains and high frequency insulators. 

3 hr. rec. Mr. Jones 

361. Advanced Ceramic Laboratory. I, II. 2 hr. PR or cone: Ch.E. 360. X-ray 
analysis, measurements of mechanical, electrical and chemical properties of 
ceramic materials. Special forming methods. Mr. Jones 

372. Advanced Chemical Engineering Design. I, II, S. 2-5 hr. PR: Ch.E. 273. 
Critical discussion of and practice in equipment-design methods. 2 hr. rec, 
0-9 hr. lab. Mr. Simons 

379. Seminar in Coal Research. I, II. 1 or 2 hr. PR: Consent. Credit 1 hr. per 
semester, maximum credit 2 hr. In cooperation with other departments and 
the Bureau of Mines. 1 hr. rec. Mr. Koehler 



V 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 279 






381. Advanced Fuel Engineering. I. 3 hr. PR: Ch.E. 282. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Koehler 

397. Research. I, II, S. PR: Ch. E. 207 and 212. 1-6 hr. Suitable problem in 
chemical engineering, metallurgy, ceramics, or fuels is selected for investigation. 

Mr. Koehler and Staff 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Profesors Davis, Downs and Sfeiden; Associate Professor Baker; Assistant Professor 
Burchinal; Instructor D'Errico. 

Undergraduate Division 

C.E. 

*1. Surveying. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Math. 4. Primarily for freshmen. Elementary 
theory of measurement of distance, direction and difference in elevation. 
Field work with transit, level, tape and stadia. Office computations and 
plotting. 1 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Staff 

*2. Surveying. I. 4 hr. PR: C.E. 1. Further theory of and practice with surveying 
instruments; plane table, topographic and hydrographic surveying, triangul- 
ation, field astronomy; office computations and plotting. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

Mr. Baker 
R-AHtiwrADr'-euRTES. II. 2 hr. PR: C.E. 2. Simple, compound, reversed and 
transition curves; vertical curves; earthwork measurement, calculation and 
distribution. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Baker 






4. Summer Surveying. S. (5 weeks) 5 hr. PR: C.E. 3. Field practice in topo- 
graphic, hydrographic, route, plane table and property surveys, bench mark 
levels, triangulation; astronomical observations; computations and map plotting. 

Mr. Baker 

5. Land Surveying. I. 4 hr. PR: Math. 10. Primarily for forestry students. 
Theory and practice with compass, transit, level, stadia, and plane table: 
computations of area; astronomical observations; map plotting. 2 hr. rec, 
6 hr. lab. Staff 

6. Topographic Mapping. II. 2 hr. PR: C.E. 5. Primarily for forestry students 
Topographic maps; surveys for roads and property lines; U.S. Public Land 
Surveys; practice in lettering, plotting and inking of topographic maps. 1 hr. 
rec, 3 hr. lab. Staff 

K>L— Elements of Highway Engineering. II. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 4. Subgrade soils; 

drainage; highway design, construction and maintenance; types of pavements; 

surveys, plans and specification; highway economics, financing and adminis- 

- / nation. 3 hr. rec Mr. Downs 

102. Railway Engineering. II. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 4. The development of American 

railroads, and their present status. Organization, construction maintenance. 
Locomotives, steam, electric, diesel and turbine. The economic principles 
of railway location, grade and operations. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Downs 

103. Highway Design. I. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 101. Preliminary line and topography 
from survey notes. Center-line projection; profile; cross-sections; grade pro- 
j^c-tion; earth work; mass diagram; revisions. 9 hr. lab. Mr. Downs 

* HOr- Structural Drafting. I, II. 2 hr. PR: M.E. 20. Lettering; symbols; detail 
drawings, pencil and ink tracings of parts of steel and concrete structures/ 
. / *, 6 hi lab. Staff 

n 

*115. Fluid Mechanics. I, II, S. ' -2- hr. PR or Cone: M. 104. Static liquids 
and gases: Bernoulli Theorem; Reynolds number; orifices and weirs; pipe 
flow for liquids and gases under turbulent and laminar conditions; uniform 
and nonuniform flow in open channels; the hydraulic jump; kinetics of liquids. 

\ 2 hr. rec. Staff 



" 






280 CURRICULA AND COURSES 






J4& — Water-supply Engineering. I. 4 hr. PR: CE. 115. Quantity required; 
sources of supply; quality of water supplies; construction of water works; 
water treatment; pumping and distribution. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Speiden 

117. Municipal Engineering. I. 2 hr. PR: C.E. 115. Required for Sanitary Engineer- 
ing option. Water supply and treatment of sewage, collection and disposal; 
garbage and rubbage; insect and rodent control; milk and food sanitation; 
industrial hygiene; swimming pool sanitation. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Speiden 

-ttfr: — Sewerage. II. 3 hr . PP.: C . E . 145 . Uniform and non-uniform fl ow in op en 
channels; quantity of sewage; rainfall and runoff; separate and combined 
systems; inverted siphons; appurtenances; design of a sewerage system-: - 2 hi. 
rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Speiden 



-H9: — bLVlb MLUIauiilj Lau oi uuuui. I, II , S 1 hr. PR or Cone: C.E. 1 1 5. Ca4i&witk>H 
of gages, meters, orifices and weirs; pipe friction; loss in bends; impulse 
flow in open channels. 3 hr. lab. Staff. 



* 120. Materials op Construction . 2 hr. PR: M. 102. The properties of wood, stone, 
mortars, cement, iron, steel, nonferrous metals, bitumens and paints; their 
economic use in engineering structures. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Downs 

121. Structural 4s*ee*££Rmc: II. 3 ■» » ■ 4 - hr. PR: M. 102. Stresses in bridge and 
roof trusses, graphically and analytically; dead and live loads; highway and 
railway loads; influence lines; beams and girders; riveted and welded con- 
nections: bridge portals and mill building bents. 3 hr. rec. for 3 hr. cr. 
In addition to above, complete design and drawing of wooden roof truss. 
3 hr. lab. 4 hr. cr. Mr. D'Errico 

122. Structural Engineering. I. %~m 3 hr. PR: M. 102. Like C.E. 121 omitting 
railway wheel loads and other special topics. 2 hr. rec. for 2 hr. cr. or with 
design as in C.E. 121. 3 hr. cr. Mr. D'Errico 

123. Bridge Design . I. x 3 hr. PR: /C.E. 121. Stresses due to dead, live and 
lateral loads; design of stringers, floor beams, truss members and con- 
nections; drawing of completed design; analysis of weight and cost estimate. 
9 hr. lab. Mr. Davis 

124. Thesis. I, II. 2 or 4 hr. Special design, investigation or original research 
of some assigned topic relating to Civil Engineering. Staff 

180. Civil Problems. I, II. 1-4 hr. For sophomores and juniors with partial credit 
in required courses. Staff 

200. Water-power Engineering. II. 2 hr. PR: C.E. 115. Flow and power of 
streams; power loads; storage required; design of a high masonry dam; 
hydraulics of turbines; turbine characteristics; appurtenances. Mr. Speiden 

-, L- ^^ -201, — Hydraulic Measurements. I, II, 3. 1 111. PR ui Cone. C.E. 115 ( il il n.il inn n| 

nrnrrn. mntnn' ^v.'fi^^ onH WH r ST pip P f riVHnn • I fy^ '*" l™"^"] ; "ipilF | P f nrhifl-rtf; 

flow in span channels. 3 hi. lab. Staff 

Water Purification. I. 3 or 4 hr. PR or Cone: C.E. 116. Slow and rapid 
Alteration; coagulation; disinfection; softening; corrosion control; specific- 
ations for filter sand and water works chemicals; physical and chemical 
characteristics of water; bacterial quality. 1 hr. rec. and 6 hr. lab. for 3 hr. cr. 
In addition to the above the design of elements of a rapid sand filter plant 
3 hr. lab. Total of 4 hr. cr. Mr. Speiden 

203. Sewage Disposal. II. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 115. Characteristics of sewage; dilution; 

irrigation; screening; sedimentation; oxidation; chlorination; digestion and 
disposal of sludge; activated sludge process; industrial wastes. 2 hr. rec, 3 
hr. lab. Mr. Speiden 

re, oT / o a J**, . 




THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 281 






204. Advanced Structures. II. 3 hr. PR. C.E. 121. Deflections of trusses and 
girders by auxiliary load of unity, Castigliano's Theorem, Williot diagram, 
elastic curve and moment area methods; cantilever bridges; two and three 
hinged arches; continuous spans; swing bridges; suspension bridges. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Davis 

206. Reinforced Concrete. II. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 121. Rectangular beams; single and 
double reinforcement; T-Beams; columns; combined bending and thrust; 
footings; concrete building bay; arch for highway bridge. 1 hr. rec, 6 hr. lab. 

Mr. Davis 

207. Foundations. I. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 121. Soil mechanics; piles; cofferdams; cassions; 
piers; abutments; spread footings; underpinning; retaining walls. 2 hr. rec. 
3 hr. lab. Mr. Davis 

208. Transportation Economics. I. 2 hr. PR or Cone: C.E. 102. The economic 
aspects of transportation based on engineering principles; highways, railways, 
waterways, airways and pipe lines— their competitive natures, costs, govern- 
ment aid and government regulations. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Downs 

209. Highway/, Laboratory. II. 2 hr. PR: M. 103. In the State Road Com- 
mission's Material Testing Laboratory, tar, asphalt, premixed paving ma- 
terial, cement, aggregates, paint, steel and other highway materials are 
tested for compliance with specifications. 6 hr. lab. Staff 

210. Photogrammetry. I. 2 hr. PR: C.E. 4. Geometry and interpretation of 
the aerial photograph; flight planning; radial-line control; principles of 
stereoscopy; plotting instruments; mosaics. 1 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Baker 

280. Civil Problems. II. 1-4 hr. For junior, senior and graduate students. Staff 



281. Water Analysis. II. 2 hr. PR: Chem. 10 and Senior or Graduate rank. Anlaysis 
c*f— w^ter from mineral, bacteriological and sanitary chemical viewpoints. Water 
poll tt4kn»r-&-hr. lab. Mr. Speiden 

Graduate Division 

351. Advanced Water-Supply Engineering. I, II. 2-6 hr. PR: C.E. 116. A detailed 
study of specific problems concerning the collection, treatment or distribution 
of water. Mr. Speiden 

352. Sewerage and Sewage Disposal. I, II. 2-6 hr. PR: C.E. 118. Special problems 
involved in the structural or hydraulic design of sewers or in the treatment 
and disposal of sewage or industrial wastes. Mr. Speiden 

353. Advanced Design Problems. I, II. 2-6 hr. A design or investigation of any 
assigned problem related to civil engineering. Mr. Davis or Mr. Speiden 

354. Statically Indeterminate Structures. I, II. 2-6 hr. Design or investigation of 
structures statically indeterminate in one or more aspects. Moment distribution. 

Mr. Davis 

$nr>. Soil Mechanics. I, II. 2-6 hr. Classification of soils; permeability; seepage; 

settlement; shearing strength; stability of slopes; lateral pressures. Special 

theoretical or laboratory investigations. Staff 

397. Research. I, II. 2-6 hr. Original report, or investigation on some topic in the 
Civil Engineering field. Mr. Davis and Mr. Speiden 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors Jones and Seibert; Associate Professors Peterson and Reed; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Dubbe and Keener; Instructors Grumbach, Smith, and Utt. 

Undergraduate Division 

E.E. 

*10. Introductory Electrical Engineering. I, II, S.J'hr. PR: Math. 3 and 4. An 
elementary course to introduce the fundamental laws and principles of 
electrical circuits. Introduction to electrical laboratory equipment and pro- 
cedure. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Smith 

Of (RAVIO ^, 



/^> J 



282 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



♦100. El e ctrical Fundamental s. I, II, S. 4 hr. PR: E.E. 10, Math. 108 (or cone.) 
Physics 106 (or cone.) Underlying principles of electric, magnetic and 
dielectric circuits including applications of Ohm's and Kirchhoff's laws. In- 
duced and generated electromotive force. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Smith 

Is- 

•+02, 103. Elements of Electrical Engineering. I, II. 4 hr. each semester. -PR: 
Physics 106. Courses for non-electrical students. The operating character- 
istics and applications of electrical machinery used in industry. Trans- 
mission and distribution of electrical energy. Safety precautions. Element- 
ary electronics. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Peterson 

*104. Illumination. I. II. 2 hr. PR: Physics 106 and Math. 108. A study of the 
basic principles and practices of illumination engineering, including a light- 
ing survey and the design of a typical lighting installation. 2 hr. rec. 

Mr. Peterson 

* 1 10. Elements of Electrical Engineering. I, II. 5 hr. PR: Phvsks 106r— -For 
students in chemical, civil and petroleum and natural gas option in -Mining 
Engineering. The operating characteristics and applications of electrical 
machinery and equipment. 3 hr. rec, 6 hr. lab. /' Mrr •Grmnbach 

130. Direct-current Machinery. I, II. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 100. A study of the con- 
struction and the operating characteristics of direct current generators 
and motors. Special applications and special types of generators. Start- 
ing and speed control of motors. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Dubbe 

131. Direct-current Machinery Laboratory. I, II. 2 hr. To accompany E.E. 130. 
A laboratory and problem course dealing with direct current machines. 6 hr. 
lab. Mr. Dubbe 

*135. Alternating-current Theory and Measurement. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 100 
and Math. 108. The study of sinusoidal wave forms, introduction and use 
of vector algebra as applied to A-C circuit analysis, analysis of linear bi- 
lateral networks, coupled circuit behavior, and polyphase systems. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Smith 

*136. Alternating-current Theory and Measurement Laboratory. I, II, S. 2 hr. 
To accompany E.E. 135. A laboratory and problem course dealing with 
alternating current circuits. 6 hr. lab. Mr. Smith 

174. Industrial Applications of Electric Control. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 103. Fun- 
damentals of electrical control devices used in industry, with emphasis on 
applications. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Jones 

180. Electrical Problems. I, II. 1-3 hr. For sophomores and juniors. Staff 

232, 233. Alternating-current Machinery. I, II. 4 hr. each semester. PR: E.E. 
130 and 135. A study of the theory and operation of transformers, induction 
motors, alternators, synchronous motors, rotary converters and single-phase 
motors. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. Mr. Reed 

244r Alternating-current Machinery Laboratory. I, II. 1 hr. PR: E.E. 23£ (or 
covm) A laboratory course in the testing and operation of alternating-ctrr-rent 
machinery. 3 hr. lab. Mr. Reed 

243 Electrical Calculations. 1, II. 2 hr. PR: E.E. 102 or 130 and E.E. 232 
(or cone) Assigned problems pertaining to the design of electrical equip- 
ment. Emphasis placed on the electrical characteristics of the equipment. 
6 hr. lab. Mr. Jones and Mr. Peterson 

245. Electric Control. I, II. 2 hr. PR: E.E. 233. A study of control equipment 
and its application. Stress is placed on the ability to understand control 
circuits. 6 hr. lab. Mr. Jones and Mr. Grumbacb 

*250. Electronics. I, II. 4 hr. PR: E.E. 135. The study of electron ballistics, tube 
characteristics, rectifiers and voltage amplifiers. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

Mr. Smith 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 283 



*252. Electronics. I, II. 4 hr. PR: E.E. 250. The study of power amplifiers, tuned 
amplifiers, oscillators and modulators. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

y Mr. Seibert 

260. Network Analysis. I, II. -3-hr. PR: E.E. 135 and Math 253. An introduction 
to network analysis as applied to the following subjects: Foster's reactance 
theorem, infinite lines, reflections on transmission lines, coupled circuits and 
filters. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Dubbe 

261. Transmission Lines. I, II. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 260. Transmission lines and terminal 
equipment at power and radio frequencies. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Keener 

*262. Communication Laboratory. I, II. 1 hr. PR: E.E. 252 (or cone.) Measure- 
ments at audio and radio frequencies. 3 hr. lab. Mr. Keener 

*264. Radio Engineering. I, II. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 252 and 262. Study and analysis 
of radio transmission, receiving and sound systems, frequency modulation, 
television, radiation and propagation. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Seiberl 

•265. Radio Laboratory. I, II. 3 hr. To accompany E.E. 264. 6 hr. lab. 

Mr. Keener and Mr. Seibert 

270. The Electrical Industry as a Public Utility. I, II. 3 hr. For seniors and 

graduates only. Economic principles involved in the selection and design 

of_electrical equipment and in the utilization of electrical energy. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Grumbach 
280. Electrical Problems. I. II. 1-3 hr. For junior, senior, and graduate students. 

Staff 
282. Symmetrical Components. II. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 233. An introduction 
to the methods of symmetrical phase components as applied in calculating 
currents in systems under various types of unbalanced conditions. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Dubbe 

284. Transients. I, II. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 135 and Math. 253. A study of the 
transient behavior of various electrical circuits and networks. Heaviside's 
Operational Calculus, Expansion Theorem, an introduction of the Laplace 
Transform methods. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Dubbe 

285. Electric- power Transmission and Distribution. I, II. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 261. 
A study of circle diagrams applied to the various characteristics of power 
transmission system, phase modifier applications and an introduction to power 
system stability. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Dubbe 

286. Industrial Control. I, II. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 245 and Math 253. Electrical- 
control devices in industry, their application and use in protection and 
control of electrical and mechanical equipment. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Jones and Mr. Keener 

287. Industrial Electronics. I, II. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 250. A survey of the theory 
and applications of electronics in industry. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Keener 

288. Antennas. II. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 264 (or cone.) Analysis and design of antenna 
systems. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Seibert 

299. Ultra-high-frequency Technology. II. 3 hr. E.E. 264 (or cone.) Study 
of special problems encountered at high and ultra-high-frequencies with 
special emphasis on pulse techniques as used in radar, television and pulse- 
modulation. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Seibert 

Graduate Division 

300. Seminar. I, II, S. 1-3 hr. PR: Consent. Discussion of research in electrical 
engineering and special problems. Staff 

350. Vacuum-tube Circuits. I, II. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 252. An advance study for the 
analysis and design of vacuum-tube circuits. Mr. Seibert 



284 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



379. Seminar in Coal Research. I, II. 1 or 2 hr. PR: Consent. Credit 1 hr. per 
semester, maximum credit 2 hr. (In cooperation with other departments and 
the U.S. Bureau of Mines.) Staff 

386. Servomechanisms. II. 3 hr. PR: M. 104 and E.E. 245. Analysis and synthesis 
of servo control circuits. Mr. Jones and Mr. Keener 

397. Research. I, II. 1-6 hr. Advanced research or special investigations on some 
topic related to electrical engineering. Mr. Jones or Mr. Seibert 

GENERAL 

Professor C. H. Cather; Associate Professors Baker and Worrell; Assistant Professor 
Weaver. 

G. 

1. Engineering Lectures. I. (no credit). Required of all freshmen in engineering. 
A series of lectures designed to acquaint the engineering student at the be- 
ginning of his course with the profession he has chosen. 1 lecture. Mr. Cather 

100. Inspection Trip. II. (No credit.) Required of all seniors in engineering. Staff 

101, Engjn^ering Society. I, II, S. i/ 2 hr. per semester. Four semesters required of 
all candidates for degrees in engineering. Membership attendaneer-and- -active 
participation in Engineering Society. 1 hr. rec. Staff 
l/\ W E&K B-NClNl-tts s 

190. Business Law. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 5 or 1 and 2 and M. 102. Contracts 
agency, business organizations, sales, negotiable instruments, real and personal 
property, professional registration and patents. Mr. Worrell and Mr. Weaver 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors H. M. Cather, J. B. T. Downs and Shaffer; Associate Professor Grow; 
Assistant Professor Peer; Instructors Delaney, L. E. Jones, Martin, and Pyles. 

Undergraduate Division 

M.E. 

*7. Welding and Heat Treatment. I, II, S. 1 hr. Practice in cutting and welding 
steel and cast iron with oxy-acetylene and electric arc welding equipment. 
Demonstrations of different methods of heat treatment. One 3 hr. lab. 

Mr. Jones and Mr. Martin 
•11. Machine Work. I, II, S. 2 hr. A study of equipment, purpose and character 
of operations, methods of holding work, turning, boring, drilling, grinding 
and shaping. Use of precision measuring instruments. Two 3 hr. lab. 

Mr. Jones, Mr. Martin, and Mr. Delaney 
*12. Machine Work. I, II, S. 1 hr. PR: M.E. 11 Continuation of M.E. llr Use- 
of milling machine, jigs, gages, heat treating, etc. One 3 hr. hrb. 

Mr. Jones, Mr. Martin and Mr. D elaney 
*i5. Welding, Forming and Heat Treatment. I, II, S. 2 hr. Molding and casting 



//v/*\3 



-/ 



,/»-*/*" 



of ferrous and nonferrous metals. Oxy-acetylene welding, arc welding, re- 
sistance welding of plates, pipe,, tubing, etc.; tempering and heat trea-fcmg 
methods. Lectures, demonstrations and shop practice. Two 3 hr. lab. 
/7, AlV. WHO INC- ft — ^ M/5A7 ~T Mr. Jones and Mr. Martin 

16. Manufacturing Proce ss e s. I, II. 2 hr. PR: M.E. 11. The economic use of 
machine tools, planning assembly line manufacture, gauging, and inspection 
during the various processes of manufacture, 2 hr. rec. Mr. Jones 



hh 



h/s 3 - 



*20. MWmTTN lcAL Drawing. I, II, S. 3 hr. Lettering, use and care of instruments, 
orthographic and auxiliary projection, isometric projection, tracing and repro- 
duction processes. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of working drawings 
for shop use. Three 3 hr. lab. Staff 















THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



285 



!£4 



i — Elements of Machine Design. I, II. 2 hr. PR: M.E. 11 and M.E. 20. Em- 
pirical design, standard commercial parts; i.e., bearings shafting, coupling, 
pulleys, keys, screw fittings, limits, tolerances and allowances, nomenclature. 



Two 3 hr. lab. 



^- | 






Staff 



"26. 



Descriptive Geometry. I, II.--3~rrr. PR: M.E. 20 and solid geometry. The 
theory of projection drawing and its application in solving practical problems 
by projection and revolution of points, lines, planes and solids, auxiliary pro- 
jections, intersections and development. 1 hr. rec. Two 3 hr. lab. Staff 

27. Mechanism. I, II. 2 hr. PR: M.E. 20 and 26.^ Graphical solutions of relative 
moti ons and velocities, instant centers, acceleration, displacement curves, 
cam layout, gear tooth outlines, gear trains. Two 3 hr. lab. Staff 

*29. Mechanism. I, II. 4~~hr. PR: M.E. 20 and 26. Graphical and analytical 
solution of position, relative motion and velocities, instant centers, acceleration 
displacement diagrams, cams, gears, and gear trains and belt drives. 2 hr. rec, 
two 3 hr. lab. Staff 



30. 



* 1 05 . 



Industrial Organization. I, II, S. 2 hr. A review of the principles of organ- 
ization and administration that are applicable to various engineering and 
industrial enterprises. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Weaver 



M, CH1 , 




122. 



123. 



124. 



140. 



e Construction. I, II. 2 hr. PR: M.E. 12. Design and construction 
of a small machine which involves selection of materials, type and sequence 
of— operations, design and construction of necessary dies, jigs, fixtures and 
special tools, tolerances, gauging, inspection and assembly. Two 3 hr. lab. 
p# Mr. Jones and Mr. Martin 

Shop Methods. I. II. 2-3 hr. Continuation of M.E. 105 with emphasis on 
quantity production involving use of semiautomatic and automatic machines. 
Two or three 3 hr. lab. Mr. Jones 

Iachine Construction. Semester and credit to be arranged. Advanced work for 
special students. Continuation of M.E. 105 and 106. Mr. Jones 

Machine Design. I, II. >f hr.. PR: M. 102 and M.E. 29. Lectures on the 
theory and design considering" stresses, strains, type of load, fatigue, factor of 
safety, friction and lubrication, columns, bearings, gears, screw threads. The 
complete design of a machine involving the necessary calculations, detail and 
assembly drawings. 2 hr. rec. Two 3 hr. computation periods. Mr. Downs 

Mechanical Laboratory. I, II. -2\ hr. PR: or cone: M.E. 221. Experiments 
involving calibration of measuring instruments, calorific value of fuels, 
phvsical properties of lubricating oil and elementary tests of engines and 
boiler. One 3 hr. lab. X Mr. Peer 

/ 
Engineering Laboratory. I, II.-&-hr. PR: M.E. 122. Measurement of flow 
of gases and vapors, economy and efficiency test of complete machines such as air 
compressors, automotive engines and diesel engines. One 3 hr. lab. 

Mr. Peer 
Thesis. I, II. 2-4 hr. Investigation or original research on some special topic 
relating to mechanical engineering. Staff 

Motion and Time Study. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Junior standing. Principles 
and techniques, job analysis, standardization and formula construction, stop 
watch and micro-motion analysis of industrial operation, development of produc- 
tion and incentive standards. Two 1 hr. rec, one 3 hr. lab. Mr. Shafer 



142. Production Control. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 140. Planning, scheduling, 
routing and dispatching in manufacturing operations and production control 
systems. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Shafer 

144. Engineering Statistics. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Junior standing. The use of 
graphical analysis; measures of central tendency and dispersion; normal, 









286 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



binomial and Poisson distributions in engineering application; linear regression 
and correlation and tests of significance. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Shafer 

Htr. Precision Measuring and Gauging. I, II. 2 hr. PR: M.E. 105 or permission. 

Instruction in care and use of precision measuring and gauging equipment. 

Projects to compare accuracy and speed of the various types of equipment. 

Two 3 hr. lab. (Not offered' 1951 to 1953.) Mr. Jones 



■/r /ss 



\<\ 



" 



l*o. Mechanical Problem*. I. II . t-6 hr. For sophomores and juniors. Staff 

203. Advanced Machine Design. I, II, S.^ hr. Continuation of M.E. 113, relating 
to axles, shafts, fly wheels, various types of gearing, rope drives, chain drives, 
clutches and machine frames. Laboratory practice in the complete design 
of a machine involving calculations, detail and assembly drawings. 2 hr. rec. 
and two 3 hr. computation periods. Mr. Downs 






-£tu\ Tool Design. I, II. 3 hr. PR: M. 102. Design, construction, application and 
economic aspects of jigs, fixtures and special tools used in manufacturing on a 
production basis. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Downs 

211. Industrial Engineering Problems. I, II. -9" hr. PR: M.E. 140. For seniors. 
Special problems relating to industrial engineering. Mr. Shafer 

-220. Heat and Power Engineering. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Physics 105 and-407 and 
Math. 108 for reg. in Math. 108). Elementary engineering therme4yjiamks, 
including gases and vapors, internal combustion engine cycles, vapor cycles, air 
compression and refrigeration. 3 hr. rec. Staff 

*£2L Thermodynamics of Engineering. I, TI, S. 3 hr. PR: Physics 105 and 107 and 
Math. 108 (or reg. in Math. 108). First and second laws of thermodynamics: 
laws of permanent gases; vapors and gas-vapor mixtures; use of diagrams and 
tables giving the properties of steam and other vapors, flow of fluids, 
throttling. 3 br. rec. Staff 

*2-2£. Heat Engines. I, II, S. 3 br. Continuation of M.E. 221. Thermodynamics as 
applied to heat power engineering; boilers, steam engines, steam turbines, 
internal combustion engines, air compressors and refrigeration. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Peer 

*223. Steam Power Plants. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 222. Principles of design 
and operation of modern steam power plants for central stations and 
for process industries. Each student submits an individual design problem. 
3 hr. rec. Mr. Cather 

224. Steam Turbines. I. II. S. 3 hr. PR: M.F. 222. Tbe tbeorv of fluid dvnamir* 
and the thermodynamics of the modern turbines; materials, construction 
details and design of important elements; influences on economy of variations 
in cycles and operative ranges. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Cather 

23Fh. — Steam- Pttwer Plant Design. I, II, S. 2 hr. Continuation of M.E. 223. -P-«^_ 
paration of plan and elevation for power plant designed in M.E. -22& — ■ 
Emphasis on equipment location, space utilization, fuel handling, duct work,. 
steam and water lines. Two 3 hr. lab. Mr. Cather 

228. Engineering Laboratory. I, II, S.»4- hr. PR: M.E. 123. Economy and efficiency 
test of steam engines, steam turbines, gas engine; comprehensive test and heat 
balance of power plant in the laboratory. 3 hr. lab. Mr. Peer 

229. Internal Combustion Engines. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 222. The thermodynamics 
of the internal combustion engines; Otto cycle; Diesel cycle; two and four- 
cycle engines, fuels, carburetion and fuel injection, combustion, engine 
performance, supercharging. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Cather and Mr. Peer 

250. Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 222. 
Methods and systems of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning of various 
types of buildings, types of controls, and their applications. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Cather 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 287 



270. Industrial Lubrication. I, II. 3 hr. PR: M. 102 and M. 104. Characteristics 
of crudes, refining methods, testing specifications, selecting, applications, 
and purification of oils and greases for industrial use. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Cather 

280. Mechanical Problems. I, II. "tsS hr. For juniors, seniors, and graduates. Staff 

286. Engineering Economy. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: M. 102. Comparison of the relative 
economy of engineering alternatives; compound interest in relation to calcu- 
lation of annual costs, present worth and prospective rates of return on in- 
vestment; increment costs, sunk costs and the economy of equipment replace- 
ment. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Shafer 

288. Job Evaluation and Wage Incentives. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: 140 or consent 
of instructor. Principles used in evaluating jobs, rates of pay; characteristics 
and objectives of wage incentive plans; incentive formulas and curves. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Shafer 

290. Industrial Statistics. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR. M.E. 144. Economic objectives of 
quality control in manufacturing through sampling methods; the Shewhart 
control chart for variable, attributes and defects per unit; statistical approach 
to acceptance procedures. 2 hr. rec. ^ Mr Shafer 

292. Plant Layout and Design. I, II, S. 2r hr. PR: M.E. 142. Problems in in- 
dustrial plant design, equipment location, space utilization, lay out for 
operation and control; flow sheets, materials handling; allied topics in power 
utilization, light, heat and ventilation. Two 3 hr. lab. Mr. Shafer 

294. Standard Manufacturing Costs. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Bus. 2 or 5. Development 
of standards for labor, material and overhead expenses; uses of standards for 
control; analyses of variances between standard and actual costs; job order 
costing and estimate costing procedures. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Shafer 

Graduate Division 

303. Advanced Machine Design. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 203. Stresses in indeter- 
minate machine parts, experimental stress analysis. Design for high temper- 
atures, pressures, and high speeds. Bearings, lubrication, balancing, and 
critical speeds. Effects and elimination of vibration in machines, impact 
and shock loading, machine mountings and shock absorbers. 3 hr. rec. 

Mr. Downs 

351. Advanced Internal Combustion Engines. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 229. 
Combustion in spark ignition engine and in compression ignition engine; 
detonation; fuel-air ratios; heat losses; lubrication; efficiencies; two-stroke 
engines; four-stroke engines, performance, exhaust turbines, gas turbines. 
3 hr. rec. Mr. Cather 

354. Advanced Refrigeration. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 250. Thermodynamics 
of vapor cycles, refrigerants, fluid flow, heat transfer, psychrometrics, types 
of refrigeration and equipment required, application of refrigeration in 
industry, food preservation. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Cather 

370. Theory of Industrial Engineering and Organization. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: 
Graduate standing and consent of instructor. History and development of 
scientific management in industry starting with early works of Taylor, Gilbreth 
and Gantt, to the present time. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Shafer 

371. Methods Analysis. I, II. 2 hr. PR: M.E. 140. An advanced study of the 
technique of methods analysis as an effective means of methods improvement 
and cost reductions. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Shafer 

372. Advanced Time Study. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 140. Review of the various 
investigations which have been made, with special consideration given to the 
development of these studies into new fields. 3 hr. rec. Mr. Shafer 



288 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



373. Budget Control. I, II. 2 hr. PR: M.E. 294. Principles involved in the 
preparation of budgets by functional divisions and the application of divi- 
sional budgets as control media. 2 hr. rec. Mr. Shafer 

374. Advanced Engineering Economy. I, II. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 286. Continuation of 
M.E. 286, with special emphasis on depreciation, engineering and economic 
aspects of selection and replacement of equipment; relationship of technical 
economy to income taxation and load factor and capacity to economy. 3 hr. 
rec. Mr. Shafer 

379. Seminar in Coal Research: I, II. 1 or 2 hr. PR: Consent. Credit 1 hr. per 
semester, maximum credit 2 hr. (In cooperation with other departments and 
the U. S. Bureau of Mines.) 

397. Research. I, II. 1-6 hr. Investigation or original research on some special topic 
relating to mechanical engineering. Mr. Cather and Staff 

MECHANICS 

Professor C. H. Cather; Associate Professor Worrell; Assistant Professors Smith and 
Weaver; Instructors Lambert and Plants. 

Undergraduate Division 

*10L Statics. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Math. 108 (or reg. in Math. 108) and Physics 
105 and 107. Fundamental definitions and the concept of static equilibrium; 
systems of forces and couples; application to solution of trusses and frames; 
centroids and moment of inertia. 3 hr. rec. Staff 

*102. Mechanics of Materials. I, II, S.^i- hr. PR: M. 101 and Math. 108. Stress 
and strain; riveted and welded joints; shafts and beams; deflection; statically 
indeterminate beams; combined stresses; column theory and design; non- 
homogenous beams; energy' loads; repeated stress. 4 hr. rec. Staff 

*103. MATCRiAL ^-ESTme- ^aboratorv, I, II, S. .1 hr. PR or cone: M. 102. Labor- 
atory tests of the tensile, compressive, transverse, torsional strength and stiff- 
ness of engineering materials. One 3 hr. lab. Staff 

*104. Kinetics. 1, II, S. 3 hr. Continuation of M. 101. PR: M. 101 and Math. 
108. Kinematics of a particle; moment of inertia of masses; translation, 
rotation and plane motion of rigid bodies; principle of work and energy, 
impulse and momentum; application to engineering problems. 3 hr. rec. Staff 

200. Advanced Mechanics of Materials. I, II. 2-4 hr. PR: M. 102. Combined 
stress and theories of failure; thick wall cylinders; flat plates; unsymmetricai 
bending; curved flexural members; localized stress; strain-energy methods in 
the analysis of statically indeterminate members. Mr. Cather 

201. Advanced Kinetics. I, II. 3 hr. PR: M. 101 and 104. Dynamic balancing; 
Corioli's Law; gyroscopes; governors; simple servo-mechanism; mechanical 
vibration. Mr. Worrell 

202. Advanced Materials Laboratory. I, II. 2-4 hr. PR: M. 102, 103. Con- 
tinuation of M. 103 with emphasis on a selected problem or problems. 

Mr. Cather or Mr. Worrell 

203. Experimental Stress Analysis. I, II. 3 hr. PR: M. 102, M. 103, M. 104. Intro- 
duction to some of the more common experimental methods of analyzing stress 
distributions. Photoelasticity, brittle lacquers, strain gage techniques and 
instrumentation, as applied to problems involving static, dynamic and residual 
stress distributions. 2 hr. rec. One 3 hr. lab. Mr. Worrell and Mr. Smith 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 289 



/ 
COURSES IN THE SCHOOL OF MINES 

Professor Spindler; Assistant Professors Ahrenholz, Laird, and Wiebe 



ryv^^H 






Undergraduate Division 
E.M 

102. Mine Surveying. S. 5 hr. (laboratory and field work). PR: E.M. 103. Con- 
tinuation of and supplementing E.M. 103; intensive field practice in under- 
ground and surface surveying. Should be taken during summer term immed- 
iately following semester in which E.M. 103 is taken. Mr. Laird and Mr. Wiebe 

103. Mine Surveying. I. II. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 1. 2 hr. rec, 1 hr. lab. Continuation of C.E. 
1 with introduction to underground surveying. Mr. Laird 

106. Mineralogy. Il.ihr. (laboratory). PR: Chem. 10. Includes 1 hr. of mineral 
identification and 1 hr. of blowpipe analysis. Mr. Laird 

107. Mining Methods. I. 4 hr. PR: Physics 106 and Geol. 1. 3 hr. rec, 1 hr. lab. In- 
spection and evaluation of mining properties, mining methods and systems 
of mining, roof control, and operating characteristics of mining machinery. 
Inspection trips with written reports required. Mr. Wiebe 

109. Coal Analysis Laboratory. I. 1 hr. (laboratory). PR: Chem. 10. Sampling, 
preparation of laboratory samples, and analysis of coal. Mr. Ahrenholz 

111. Introductory Mining. I. 2 hr. PR: Chem. 15 and Phys. 106. Explosives, tim- 
bering;, drilling, and shaft sinking. Mr. Ahrenholz 

201. Oil-field Development. I. 2 hr. PR: Geol. 3. Introduction to principles, equip- 
ment, and methods applied to development of an oil property. Mr. Laird 

- 

20L Oil and Gas Production. II. 4 hr. PR: E.M. 201. Continuation of E.M. 201 with 
a core-analysis laboratory. 3 hr. rec, 1 hr. lab. Mr. Laird 

205. Gas-measurement Engineering. 1. 2 hr. PR: E.M. 201 and C.E. 115. (1 hr. rec, 
1 hr. lab.) Methods of commercial gas measurement and pressure regulation with 
a laboratory devoted to use of various types of equipment. Mr. Laird 

206. Elements of Geophysical Prospecting. I. 2 or 3 hr. PR: Geol. 205, Math. 107, 
Phys. 106. (2 hr. rec, 1 hr. lab.) Methods, instruments, and calculations for 
geophysical prospecting with field practice in use of instruments. Mr. Laird 

207. Introductory Seismology. I, II. 1 hr. PR: Phys. 106, Geol. 205. Earthquakes 
and their causes and area distribution; theory of elastic waves; the principles 
of seismograph construction, adjustment, and operation; interpretation and 
calculation of seismograms with exercises provided by records of the University 
seismograph station. Mr. Laird 

208. Geological Surveying. II. 1 hr. PR: E.M. 103 and Geol. 161. 1 hr. field and 
lab. Topographic mapping with the plane table. Mr. Laird and Mr. Wiebe 

212. Advanced Mining. II. -4-hr-. PR: E.M. Ill and E.E. 103. Methods, equipment, 
and engineering principles applied to mine haulage, hoisting, and drainage. 

Mr. Wiebe 

213. Mine Ventilation. I. 3 hr. PR: E.M. 107 and E.M. 212. (2 hr. rec, 1 hr. lab.). 
Purposes, principles, methods, and equipment pertaining to ventilation of mines. 

Mr. Spindler 

214. Coal Production, Cost Control and Economics. I. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 5, Acct. 
5, and E.M. 107, or consent of instructor. Coal property valuation, capitalized 
costs in mining and recovery of investment, analysis of mining costs, cost 
control and time analysis of mining operations, purchasing and inventories. 

Mr. Wiebe 




290 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



215. Industrial Safety Engineering, i, II. 2 hr. PR: Senior standing. Analysis of 
problems of industrial safety and accident prevention, laws pertaining to 
industrial safety and health, compensation plans and laws, and industrial 
property protection. Mr. Ahrenholz 

216. Petroleum Engineering Design. 1. 2 hr. PR: E.M. 204 (laboratory). 
Structural and machine analysis and design as related to the production and 
transportation of oil and natural gas. Mr. Laird 

217. Coal Preparation. I. 4 hr. (2 hr. rec, 2 hr. lab.) PR. E.M. 212, E.M. 109, and 
M. 104. Principles of preparation and benefkiation of coal for marketing, with 
laboratory devoted to sampling, float and sink separation, and use of various 
types of coal-cleaning equipment. Mr. Ahrenholz 

218. Advanced Mineral Preparation. II. 3 hr. (2 hr. rec, 1 hr. lab.) PR: E.M. 106, 
E.M. 217. The theory and practice of concentrating ores and industrial min- 
erals with special consideration to the more recent advances in the beneficia- 
tion of both ores and coal. Mr. Ahrenholz 

219. Advanced Mining Methods for Vein Deposits. I, II. 3 hr. PR: E.M. 107, M. 
104. Methods and systems of mining other than flat seams. Emphasis placed on 
selection of methods in relation to cohesive strength of ore bodies and their 
enclosing wall rocks. Mining of anthracite seams included. Mr. Ahrenholz 

220. Mine Design. I, II. 2 hr. (laboratory). PR: E.M. 212 and registration in C.E. 
122. Design of an underground mining development with full report. 

Mr. Spindler and Mr. Wiebe 

221. Mine Design. I, II. 3 hr. (laboratory). PR: E.M. 220. Continuation of E.M. 
220 including design of preparation plant and loading facilities with full re- 
port covering plan, equipment, operation, and costs. 

Mr. Spindler and Mr. Ahrenholz 

222. Mine Equipment and Machinery. II. 2 hr. PR: E.E. 103 and E. M. 212. Selec- 
tion, installation, operation, and maintenance of mining equipment. 

Mr. Wiebe 

223. Mine Management. 42-bfc PR: E.M. 212, and Senior standing. Economic, govern- 
mental, social, and labor aspects of mining as related to the management of a 
mining enterprise. Mr. Spindler 

224, 225 Mining Engineering Problems. I, II. 1 to 3 hr. PR: Senior or graduate 
standing. Investigation and detailed report on a special problem in mining 
engineering related to coal mining, mineral mining, or geological, petroleum, 
and natural gas engineering. Supervision and guidance by a member of the 
graduate faculty. Staff 

226. Advanced Mining Equipment Applications. I. 3 hr. (2 hr. rec, 1 hi. lab.) 
PR: E.M. 222. Structural, mechanical, hydraulic and electrical characteristics 
of the more common items of mining equipment. Controls, electrical and 
hydraulic circuits, and mechanical transmissions with associated problems. 
Laboratory design of a control system for a mining machine. Mr. Wiebe 

Graduate Division 

301, 302. Advanced Mine Design. 1, II. Credit arranged. Advanced detail design 
and layout of coal-mine plant, particularly incorporating new ideas of machines 
and mining methods. Staff 

351. Coal Mining. SI. 3 hr. PR: Chemistry, 10 hr., Physics, 10 hr., and accompanied 
or preceded by general geology. Especially for students who are planning to 
teach mining subjects in high school. Not open to students taking E.M. 102, 
111, and 212. Hours arranged. Staff 

379. Seminar in Coal Research. I, II. 1 or 2 hr. PR: Consent. Credit 1 hr. per 
semester, maximum credit 2 hr. (In cooperation with other departments and 
the U.S. Bureau of Mines.) Staff 







THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 291 



395, 396. Graduate Seminar in Coal Mine Operation and Administration. I, II. 
3 hr. PR: B.S. Degree and consent of Committee. Group discussion and 
analysis of problems related to the production, preparation, marketing, and 
utilization of coal with special assignments and emphasis in accordance with 
personal background and field of interest of the individual students. Staff 

397, 398. Research. I, II. Credit arranged. Individual problem in some phase of 
mining. Carefully prepared report required. Staff 



The Graduate School 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



By the order of the Board of Governors of West Virginia University a University 
Graduate School is established, whose roots are implanted in all University under- 
graduate work, irrespective of departments or schools. The Graduate School is 
empowered (1) to direct research and investigation with particular reference to 
problems of the State and (2) to train and recommend to the Board of Governors 
candidates for the degrees of Master of Science, Master of Science (Home Economics 
Education), Master of Science in the various Engineering branches, Master of Arts, 
Master of Music, Master of Social Work, Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of 
Education. 

All regulations governing the Graduate School such as the determination of 
curricula, projects, majors, minors, standards, thesis requirements, and similar matters 
shall be formulated by the Executive Committee and the Dean of the Graduate School 
and presented to the Graduate Faculty for its consideration and action. 

THE STUDENT BODY 

Seniors in the colleges of West Virginia University who are within 10 semester 
hours of graduation may, with the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School, 
enroll for graduate courses for which they may receive graduate credit after obtaining 
their bachelors' degrees. Such graduate courses must not have been offered for 
undergraduate credit, and in every case permission must have been requested before 
or at the time of enrolling for the course or courses. Normally, the maximum amount 
of credit available to a senior by petition in this manner before he completes all 
requirements for the baccalaureate degree and gains admission to the Graduate School 
shall be 15 semester hours. 

THE ADVISER 

The adviser will arrange a specific course of study to be approved by the Dean and, 
in the case of candidates for advanced degrees, will preside at the candidate's qualifying 
and final examination. 

THE FACULTY 

The Graduate Faculty is composed of those faculty members who are actively 
assisting with any phase of the graduate program such as teaching graduate courses, 
directing graduate research, supervising thesis and problem work, advising graduate 
students and directing their graduate studies. Membership is by appointment by the 
Dean of the Graduate School following certification by the Executive Committee. 
Deans and Directors of the various colleges and schools and the President and Vice- 
president of the University are members ex officio. 

GRADUATE DEGREES 

Graduate degrees offered by the departments in the University which have been 
approved for graduate work are as follows: 
Master of Arts (A.M.) 
Master of Music (Mus.M.) 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

Master of Science in Chemical Engineering (M.S.Ch.E.) 
Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (M.S.E.E.) 
Master of Science in Civil Engineering (M.S.C.E.) 

292 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 293 



Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering ( M.S.M.E.) 

Master of Science in Engineering of Mines (M.S.E.M.) 

Master of Science in Home Economics Education (M.S.H.E.E.) 

Master of Science (Biochemistry) 

Master of Social Work 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 

The following professional degrees are conferred upon graduates of the College 
of Engineering and the School of Mines of West Virginia University on the basis of 
practical experience and study in absentia, the presentation of a thesis, and an oral 
final examination. 

Engineer of Mines (E.M.) Chemical Engineer (Ch.E.) 

Mechanical Engineer (M.E.) Civil Engineer (C.E.) 

Electrical Engineer (E.E.) 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GRADUATE DEGREE 
General Regulations 

1 . candidacy 

Admission to candidacy for any graduate degree is conditioned upon the fulfillment 
of the requirements for admission to the Graduate School, and also the particular 
requirements of undergraduate and graduate preparation for the field of study in 
which the student wishes to specialize. Unconditional admission to candidacy for 
an advanced degree involves a suitable period of graduate work in residence in which 
the student demonstrates his ability to do work of graduate caliber. Detailed informa- 
tion concerning candidacy for the Master's Degree and the Doctor's Degree may be 
found on the pages immediately following. 

2. SCHOLARSHIP 

No credits are acceptable toward an advanced degree which are reported with a 
grade lower than "C." 

Reasonable standards of oral and written English must be maintained. 

3. CURRICULUM 

Credit toward a graduate degree may be obtained only for courses listed in this 
Bulletin and numbered 200-399. 

No more than 15 hours of graduate courses in any one semester nor more than 
6 hours of graduate courses in any one term of the Summer Session may be carried 
by a student. Any exception to this rule must be approved in advance by the Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

4. RESIDENCE AND EXTENSION 

Residence credit for special field assignments and for work taken off the University 
campus shall be allowed only with prior approval of the Dean. 

Xo more than 15 hours of extension work may be counted by any one student 
toward the Master's Degree. 

For majors in Education, no more than 12 hours by extension may be counted 
toward the Master's Degree. 

The maximum credit that students pursuing graduate work by extension may 
receive in any one field shall be 8 semester hours. 

No more than 6 hours of graduate credit obtained in other approved institutions 
may be considered in meeting the requirements for the Master's Degree in West 
Virginia University.* Graduate credits so accepted toward the Master's Degree must 
meet the usual departmental requirements for a continuous and unified program of 

♦This regulation applies to all masters' degrees based upon a total credit 
requirement of 30 to 36 semester hours. The degree of Master of Social Work is 
based upon a total credit requirement of 54 to 60 semester hours, 24 to 30 of which 
may be transferred under suitable conditions, but the last 30 of which must be 
earned and completed in West Virginia University. 



294 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



graduate study and will reduce correspondingly the number of hours of graduate work 
by extension offered in West Virginia University extension centers that may be 
offered in meeting the requirement for the Master's Degree. 

The time during which credit may be acquired in extension offered by institutions 
outside the state shall be limited in any area as determined by the University Com- 
mittee on Extension and properly publicized by the Director of Extension. 

No credits earned by extension prior to the admission of the student to graduate 
work and acceptance for graduate study may be counted toward meeting the require- 
ments for the Master's Degree. This rule shall not apply to seniors in West Virginia 
University within ten hours of graduation who petition for graduate credit for courses 
not used to meet undergraduate requirements. 

Each graduate student in residence, whether taking course work or engaged in 
conducting research or in writing a thesis or report, must register at the beginning 
of each semester or term during which graduate work is being done. He must be 
registered during the session in which he is to appear for final examination. Under 
exceptional conditions and with the prior approval of the Dean a graduate student 
may be permitted to meet a portion of the requirements for the degree in absentia, 
provided the customary residence and other requirements are met. 

5. LIMITATION OF CREDIT LOADS FOR PART-TIME GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Part-time graduate students will be required to reduce their credit loads in 
proportion to the outside service rendered and the time available for graduate study. 
In general, persons in full-time service to the University or other employer will not 
be permitted to enroll for more than 4 hours of work in any one semester or to obtain 
credit for more than 8 hours in any one academic year. In corresponding manner 
the maximum credit load for a single summer term of six weeks shall be 2 hours and 
for a Summer Session of nine or twelve weeks it shall be 3 hours. Any exceptions to 
these limitations will be by permission of the Dean only and prior to registration for 
the work. 

6. CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

The Graduate School will allow credit for educational experience in the Armed 
Forces in partial satisfaction of advanced degree requirements for courses of the 
200-399 series established by the Committee on Admissions by evaluation and/or by 
examination. For the Master's Degree, veterans may receive a maximum of 6 hours 
of credit by examination for work taken in the Armed Forces, but credit so obtained 
will reduce correspondingly the amount permitted by transfer from another institu- 
tion. Such credit, however, will not serve to reduce graduate-degree residence re- 
quirements. 

7. THESES AND PROBLEM REPORTS 

All theses and problems reports shall be presented in the form prescribed at 
least one month previous to the Commencement Day on which the degree is ex- 
pected. If the thesis or problem report is accepted, typewritten and bound copies 
shall be submitted to the Office of the Graduate School at least one week before the 
degree is to be conferred; a minimum of five copies of the master's or doctor's thesis 
or problem report is required. 

8. FINAL EXAMINATIONS 

The candidate shall not be eligible for the final examination until his thesis or 
problem report has been approved by the examining committee. Following approval 
of the candidate's thesis or problem report and satisfactory completion of the courses 
in residence and satisfaction of other graduate requirements, he shall be given a final 
examination by his advisory committee. Examining committees for theses and for 
final examinations for advanced degrees shall contain no fewer than three members 
for candidates for the Master's degree, and no fewer than five members for candidates 
for the Doctor's degree. In order to have his thesis accepted or to be considered 
as having satisfactorily passed his examination, the candidate shall have no more 
than one unfavorable vote in each case. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 295 



9. REQUEST FOR DEGREE 

At the time of registration for the semester or session in which the candidate 
expects to receive a graduate degree, he shall submit a formal request to the Dean of 
the Graduate School for the conferring of such degree. The candidate must have 
completed all requirements for the degree which he wishes to receive, at least one 
week before Commencement Day. 

10. COMMENCEMENT ATTENDANCE 

Candidates for degrees to be conferred at the close of the second semester are 
expected to be present in person to receive their degrees. 

The Degree of Master of Arts and Master of Science 
requirements for candidacy 

Satisfactory fulfillment of General Regulation No. 1 for graduate degrees (stated 
on page 15) will admit an applicant to candidacy. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPLETION 

The completion within a period of seven years* immediately preceding the con- 
ferring of the degree, except with the permission of the Dean, of no less than 30 credit 
hours of graduate work approved by the adviser. 

Residence: A minimum is required of two semesters, or one semester and three 
summer terms, or five summer terms of residence in full-time graduate study at West 
Virginia University. For students offering 15 credit hours in extension, a minimum 
period of residence at West Virginia University of one semester or three summer terms 
shall be required for the Master's Degree. 

Program: In general when a thesis is offered, the program will consist of 24 hours 
or more of suitable course work and 1 to 6 hours of thesis or research. 

Thesis or Problem Report: A thesis or problem report granting no more than 
6 hours of credit may be required by the faculty of the college, school, or department 
in which the candidate's major interest lies. 

Final Examination: An examination, oral or written or both at the option of the 
candidate's examining committee, shall be required, covering the candidate's thesis or 
problem report, studies in his major and minor fields, and his ability to apply facts 
and principles. 

Special Requirements: The candidate must meet the special requirements of the 
department in which he pursues his major study. 

The Professional Certificate of Social Work and 

the Degree of Master of Social Work 

requirements for the professional certificate of social work 

The Professional Certificate of Social Work is awarded to students who have 
completed 30 hours of graduate social work courses including 10 semester hours of 
field work, and who have met all other requirements of the Graduate School. Full- 
time students can complete the work in lO 1 /^ months. The normal schedule consists 
of one semester of classroom work; a block of full-time field work, one semester in 
length; and a second classroom period of six weeks. 

♦This ruling was discontinued temporarily during the war period. It was 
reinstated, effective June 1, 1948, as follows: 

Beginning with the first summer term of 1948, the seven-year rule will again 
be put into effect with the provision that, in the cases of students who have 
already started their graduate programs, the adviser and the Dean of the 
Graduate School will determine whether work taken before the seven-year period 
shall be accepted for credit. If the adviser and the Dean cannot agree, the case 
shall be brought before the FJxecutive Committee for review. In the event that a 
graduate student began work during the war period, an extension up to a 
maximum of five years may be granted. 



296 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK 

The degree of Master of Social Work is conferred by the University upon those 
students satisfactorily completing the requirements as established by the Graduate 
School. These requirements are: 

1. Broad pre-professional training including not fewer than 24 hours of under- 
graduate work in the social sciences. 

2. Completion of graduate courses approved by the Department of Social Work 
totaling not fewer than 54 semester hours, of which the last 30 hours shall have been 
completed in "West Virginia University. In most cases the total program will range 
from 54 to 60 hours in order that the student may obtain 6 to 12 hours of elective 
work in the social sciences. 

3. Completion of 20 semester hours or two full semesters of supervised field work 
under faculty direction. 

4. Completion of a problem report. 

5. Demonstration of competency in the theory and practice of social work to 
the satisfaction of the faculty of the Department. This will include passing with a 
satisfactory grade a comprehensive final examination, which may be oral or written, 
or both, at the discretion of the Department. The degree will not be awarded solely 
for credits earned. 

For most students the requirements for the degree of Master of Social Work can 
be met in one year after completion of the requirements for the certificate. 

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
requirements for candidacy 

Admission to the Graduate School and enrollment in graduate courses does not of 
itself imply acceptance ol the applicant for a Doctor's Degree. After a period of 
residence the applicant will be admitted to a comprehensive preliminary or qualifying 
examination (either oral or written or both) in which he must demonstrate (a) a grasp 
of the important phases and problems of the field of study in which he proposes to 
major and an application of their relation to other fields of human knowledge and 
accomplishments, (b) the ability to employ rationally the instruments of research that 
have been developed in his major field, and (c) the ability to read French and German 
to the satisfaction of his examining committee. 8 

When an applicant has successfully passed his qualifying examination he will be 
formally promoted to candidacy for the Doctor's Degree. Admission to candidacy 
must precede the final examination for the Doctor's Degree by at least one academic 
year. Graduate courses pursued in fulfillment of the requirements for the Master's 
Degree, if of suitable character and quality, may be credited toward the doctorate. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPLETION 

(a) Curriculum: The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy is not awarded for the mere 
accumulation of course credits nor for the completion of a definite residence require- 
ment. The exact amount and nature of course work to be undertaken by a candidate 
will be determined in light of his previous preparation and the demands of his chosen 
field of application. The aggregate of correlated courses of graduate instruction, 
should, however, be no less than 60 semester hours, exclusive of research or thesis, 
except research or thesis credits earned for the Master's Degree. These credits shall be 
ordered and distributed so as to promote broad and systematic knoAvledge and the 
ability to carry on independent research. 

(b) Residence: In general the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
contemplate at least three years of full-time graduate work bevond the Bachelor's 
Degree. A minimum of 36 weeks in residence in full-time graduate studv at W 7 est 
Virginia University is required. 

(c) Thesis: The candidate must submit a thesis pursued under the direction of 
the faculty of this University on some problem in the field of his major interest. The 
thesis must present the results of the candidate's individual investigation and must 
embody a definite contribution to knowledge. 

8With the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School, one other language 
may be substituted for French or German. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 297 



(d) Special Requirements: The candidate must satisfy such special requirements 
subject to approval of the Dean of the Graduate School, as may be required by the 
faculty of the college or department in which his major lies. All required examina- 
tions in modern languages shall be taken not later than one academic year before the 
final examination for the degree. 

(e) Final Examination: If the candidate's thesis is approved and he has fulfilled 
all other requirements stated above, he will be admitted to final oral examination on 
bis thesis before his examining committee. At the option of this committee, a 
comprehensive written examination also may be required. 

Note: Departments offering the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy are: Agricultural 
Biochemistry, Agronomy and Genetics, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Geology, 
History, and Plant Pathology and Bacteriology. 

The Degree of Doctor of Education 

This is a professional degree open to school leaders, administrators, teachers, and 
counselors who furnish evidence of significant and appropriate teaching experience. 
Persons expressing a desire to pursue the program leading to this degree must 
satisfy a College of Education faculty Committee on Prerequisites. 



The School of Journalism 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

THE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM 

The first instruction in journalism at West Virginia University consisted of a 
two-hour course in news writing offered in 1915 in the Department of English of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. A sequence of professional courses was inauguarted by 
the same department in 1920. As the demand increased, a complete professional cur- 
riculum was made available. In 1927 an additional full-time instructor was engaged, 
larger quarters were obtained, and a separate Department of Journalism was created. 

From year to year as enrollments grew, notice was taken of the superior quality 
and esprit de corps of the students who chose journalism as a field of major concen- 
tration. In 1935 a third full-time instructor was employed, and laboratories for 
instruction in news photography and typography were provided. By 1938 no fewer 
than 160 alumni had graduated from the professional courses, and many were filling 
positions of distinction. Forty per cent of the number were connected with newspapers 
and magazines. The others were engaged in advertising, business, public relations, 
radio, high-school or college instruction, library administration, and secretarial 
work or in the activities of home makers and community leaders. More than ninety- 
seven per cent were employed. 

In consequence of the substantial development over nearly two decades and in 
view of the rapid advancement of professional schools of journalism throughout the 
nation, the University Board of Governors on April 22, 1939, separated the journalism 
unit from the College of Arts and Science and reorganized it as a School of Journalism 
with an administrative status similar to that of other schools and colleges of the Uni- 
versity. Since that time the School has conferred the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Journalism on 246, of whom 139 are men. Since 1920 the University has graduated 
416 persons with journalism as a major field of study. Of this number slightly fewer 
than half are women. A fourth full-time instructor was added in 1946 and a fifth 
full-time instructor in 1949. To expand and intensify the instruction in newspaper 
advertising, industrial journalism, radio journalism, news photography, printing 
processes, promotion, public relations and administration, eight lecturers in journalism 
were engaged for 1952-53. 

Aims 

The main purposes of the school are these: (1) To find and prepare superior 
young men and young women who contemplate reporting and other journalistic 
writing, or radio journalism, or advertising, or the editing and management of 
newspapers or special periodicals, as a career; (2) to provide in addition to thorough 
and complete technical training the broad informational background and sure 
intellectual discernment that distinguish educated persons; (3) to cultivate a full 
sense of the responsibility that modern workers in the field of communications must 
assume in their relation to the community, state, and nation, and to familiarize them 
with tested procedure in pursuing objectives of high social value; (4) to stimulate an 
inquiring attitude toward journalism as an institution and promote scholarly research 
in its various branches; (5) to furnish a suitable educational foundation for persons 
looking forward to business or professional work closely related to journalistic practice. 

Standards 

From the beginning, instruction in journalism at West Virginia University has 
been in accord with the best professional-school standards. Emphasis has ever been 
on quality, not numbers. Only students with a scholastic rating of approximately "B" 
or higher have been encouraged to take the basic courses in reporting, and those not 

298 



THE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM 299 



able to maintain an equally high standard in the first journalism courses have been 
requested to choose a major elsewhere. 

The instructional staff has been engaged with careful attention to their individual 
ability to give expert instruction in particular fields. The curricula have been kept 
constantly abreast of progress in leading educational centers. Class sizes have never 
reached proportions where individual instruction had to be sacrificed. The school 
now conforms to recognized national standards, especially those required by the 
American Society of Journalism School Administrators, and is ranked with superior 
professional schools of the United States. 

Location and Equipment 

The School of Journalism, after being housed in Woodburn Hall for more than 
32 years, moved into Martin Hall in 1953 where it occupies almost the entire building. 
This fine old academic structure of late Georgian design is located on the Circle in 
the center of campus activity. After extensive renovation, various alterations, and 
other changes in the interest of instructional efficiency and modern appearance, the 
building now serves virtually all the functional purposes that might be obtained from 
an entirely new structure. 

With its basement and three stories, Martin Hall has the equivalent of 32 
standard-sized classrooms, 29 of which provide the School with lecture rooms, an 
audio-visual classroom, an auditorium seating over 150 persons, a front business office 
and advertising seminar room, an advertising layout laboratory, a typographical 
laboratory, a composing and press room, quarters for a proposed offset photo-engraving 
laboratory, a large newsroom, a reading room, seven news-photography darkrooms, a 
radio journalism laboratory with expansion space for a television news laboratory, a 
room for the West Virginia Journalism Hall of Fame, a lounge, offices for the instruc- 
tional and editorial staffs, and space reserved for editorial rooms for the student 
yearbook and humor magazine. 

In most respects the journalism rooms devoted to instruction in newspaper editing 
and publishing are equipped like the editorial and business quarters of a large 
weekly or a small-city daily newspaper. The large newsroom contains a U-copy desk, 
many work tables and desks, telephones, and 25 typewriters with desks. There is also 
a teletypewriter on which United Press dispatches typed in the style of copy used on 
teletypesetter circuits may be received from 3 p.m. to 3 a.m. every day. These reports 
are edited for the University daily newspaper by journalism majors working under 
the supervision of faculty members. These wire reports also furnish laboratory 
material for various classes. 

The adjacent reading room contains a reference library and various newspaper 
files. It receives daily representative newspapers of the nation. It makes available 
for intensive study about 20 of the leading dailies, many carefully selected weeklies, 
and a number of the standard magazines of the United States. It has also a 
collection of the best high-school and college newspapers in West Virginia and other 
states. The school subscribes to most of the important special periodicals of the 
publishing and writing professions. A number of journalism books in frequent use 
are shelved in this room. 

For instruction in newspaper typography, a large laboratory has been equipped 
not only for providing demonstration material but also for giving the individual 
student extensive practice in the setting and adaptation of type. The advertising-layout 
laboratory is supplied with special tables and desks for applied instruction. The 
facilities of the news-photography laboratory have been greatly increased. Additional 
cameras and developing materials are being added. Practice facilities are excellent 
for those wishing to specialize in news-reporting with the camera. Equipment for 
training in the various journalistic aspects of radio has been provided. The use of 
television in news reporting is also being given preliminary attention. The School 
offers comprehensive programs of instruction in radio-journalism, industrial publica- 
tions and public-relations. A special new laboratory is being put into operation 
for prospective industrial journalists. 

Additional opportunities for observation and practice, especially in the business 
and mechanical aspects of newspaper work, are provided at the plant of the West 



300 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Virginia Newspaper Publishing Company, in Morgantown, where the University 
newspaper is printed under contract. 

Practice Opportunities 

Opportunities for applying the principles of sound newspaper and radio practice 
are good. The Daily Athenaeum, a five-day campus newspaper, is produced by 
journalism students in the various workrooms of the school where laboratories are 
conducted from 2-5 p.m. and from 7-10 p.m. every day except Saturday and Sun- 
day. Reporters working on news runs cover the University community thoroughly, 
and trained deskworkers not only edit the local reporter's copy but also prepare for 
publication the dispatches of state, national, and world origin received by the United 
Press teletype. Local pictures are taken by the campus newspaper's own staff photog- 
raphers, and other news pictures are selected from mats purchased from a national 
distributor. 

All reporters serve as correspondents of weekly and daily newspapers. Majors 
pursuing the advertising-management sequence are required to spend no fewer than 
five hours a week soliciting advertising accounts for the campus daily, writing copy, 
and otherwise servicing their accounts, and making collections for advertising sold. 
Some students get additional practice by working part-time for Morgantown dailies 
or by taking vacation positions on newspapers of their home community. Majors are 
especially urged to obtain vacation work on a good weekly or daily newspaper during 
the summers that precede their junior and senior years. As a rule, student journalists 
have staff positions on, or are regular contributors to, other campus publications. 

Students in the radio journalism sequence receive practical instruction not only 
in the University broadcasting studio but at Station WAJR, Morgantown, with which 
working relations exist. Campus, local, and world news is broadcast at WAJR every 
day from scripts prepared by radio students. Special scripts are also presented from 
time to time. In the school's radio laboratory are records for making recordings, a 
playback, a wire recorder, two tape recorders, a receiving set, and other equipment 
essential to such instruction. 

The Placement of Graduates 

During the last three decades alumni who had completed all or most of the 
professional courses in journalism have found little difficulty in finding desirable 
positions. Although the school cannot guarantee positions to graduates, it is glad to 
assist them in learning of openings and in making contact with employers. To this end 
it maintains without charge a placement register for both current and past graduates. 
Students and alumni are also invited to make free use of the University Placement 
Service. 

Professional Relations and Services 

For 30 years publishers, editors, and other communications workers have paid 
annual visits to the University Campus to attend the State Journalism Conference. 
Among the organized groups that have participated are the West Virginia Publishers' 
Association, the West Virginia Associated Press, the West Virginia State Newspaper 
Council, West Virginia Industrial Magazine Editors, the West Virginia Broadcasters' 
Association, the West Virginia Sports Writers' Association, and the West Virginia 
Intercollegiate Press Association. On these occasions the journalism faculty and 
students have become acquainted with the practicing press, and members of the 
Fourth Estate have come to know one another better and have exchanged tested ideas. 

About one hundred of the leading newspaper men of the nation and world have 
made addresses at these conferences. Technical experts have traced the progress of 
journalistic science and invention. Business and advertising specialists have conducted 
practical symposia in which their hearers freely took part. Editors of vision have 
given arresting glimpses of the still greater journalism of the future. The opportunity 
to hear leaders of newspaper organizations and to mingle with persons successfully 
engaged in newspaper practice and other forms of mass communication has long 
been appreciated by the young men and women in training. 



THE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM 301 



In order to perpetuate the names, achievements, and ideals of the state's dis- 
tinguished editors of the past, the West Virginia Journalism Hall of Fame was 
instituted in 1935. Elections, which are made by the members of the State Newspaper 
Council, take place every two years. Suitable memorials are to be placed in Martin 
Hall in a special room designed for the Hall of Fame and exhibits of historical 
significance. The names of persons thus far honored follow: 

Archibald Campbell (1883-1899). Wheeling Intelligencer. Elected 1935. 

Andrew Price (1871-1930). Pocahontas Times, Marlinton. Elected 1935. 

John Gabriel Jacob (1826-1903). Wellsburg Herald. Elected 1937. 

Enos W. Newton ( -1856). Kanawha Republican, Charleston. Elected 1937. 

Albert Sidney Johnson (1863-1925). Monroe Watchman, Union. Elected 1939. 

Harry Lambright Snyder (1861-1935). Shepherdstown Register. Elected 1939. 

Jefferson Slidell Brown (1861-1935). Randolph Enterprise, Elkins. Elected 1941. 

Robert S. Northcott (1818-1905). National Telegraph, Clarksburg. Elected 1941. 

William E. Chilton (1858-1939). Charleston Gazette. Elected 1943. 

Howard Holt (1883-1936). Grafton Sentinel. Elected 1943. 

Aldine S. Poling (1867-1936). Barbour Democrat, Philippi. Elected 1945. 

Herschel Coombs Ogden (1869-1943). Wheeling News-Register and other West 

Virginia newspapers. Elected 1945. 
Gilbert Miller (1878-1939). Post and Dominion-News, Morgantown. Elected 

1947. 
Horatio Seymour Whetsell (1868-1941). Preston County Journal, Kingwood. 

Elected 1947. 
William M. O. Dawson (1853-1916). Preston County Journal, Kingwood. 

Elected 1949. 
Samuel Alexander McCoy (1880-1935). Moorefleld Examiner. Elected 1949. 
William B. Blake, Sr. (1851-1938). West Virginia News, Ronceverte. Elected 

1951. 
Earl Herndon Smith (1879-1940). Fairmont Times. Elected 1951. 

From the beginning the press of the State has assumed a cordial and cooperative 
attitude toward professional training for journalism at the University. For many 
years the State Newspaper Council has had among its standing committees one on 
Educational and Professional Standards and another on School of Journalism Building. 
The former group has interested itself long and earnestly in helping the journalism 
unit maintain high-grade instruction and offer study inducements such as scholarships 
to superior young people, and the latter has concerned itself with ways and means 
of obtaining still better housing and equipment facilities for the school. Because of 
intensive study of elementary journalism in high schools and increasing attention 
paid to school publications, together with wide use of the newspaper as a teaching 
aid in English, civics, history, geography, science, and other subjects, the University 
has long cooperated with the state's educators. The School of Journalism provides 
an annual critical service for high school news-periodicals and awards various degrees 
of excellence. It also unites with the West Virginia Association of Scholastic Jour- 
nalism Directors each year in conducting a two-day State Institute of Scholastic 
Journalism in which the problems of teaching journalism and publishing newspapers 
and annuals are professionally considered. 

Journalism Organizations 

Journalism organizations of which eligible students may become members are: 
The University Press Club, to which all proficient reporters and advanced students 
belong; Theta Sigma Phi, national organization of high-scholarship women in schools 
of journalism and of professional women in newspaper, magazine, radio, publicity, 
and other writing fields; Journaliers, professional fraternity; and Kappa Tau Alpha, 
national journalistic scholarship society, to which about ten per cent of the highest- 
ranking majors are elected each year. Many other University organizations are also 
open to journalism students with special interests outside the field of journalism. 

Courses Open to Non-Journalism Majors 

Major students in other colleges of the University may pursue courses in journal- 
ism for credit, provided these students can offer in each instance the necessary 
prerequisites. 



302 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Proficiency in English 

Regular students of the University or transfers from other colleges and universities 
are expected to speak and write the English language with a marked degree of 
correctness. This means that in their English composition courses they should have 
achieved a standing of approximately "B" or higher. If upon entering the School of 
Journalism a student is found deficient in English, he will be required to take one 
or more additional courses in rhetoric. 

Typewriting and Shorthand 

Before or soon after entering the University, a student planning to become a 
journalism major should learn the touch system of typewriting. From the beginning 
every reporter is expected to submit copy in neat typewritten form and to have 
a typing speed of no fewer than forty words a minute. If the reporter cannot demon- 
strate such typing ability, he may be asked to withdraw from the reporting course. 
He will find it advantageous to have his own machine. 

Persons training for book-publishing or advertising-agency work and those expect- 
ing to become secretaries or assistants to executives find shorthand either desirable 
or indispensible. Such students are advised to learn it before coming to college or 
during their freshman or sophomore year. 

The Committee on Scholarship 
Messrs. Reed, Bond, and Krakowski. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

THE BROAD EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION 

Far more than previously, newspaper publishers and other executives in the field 
of communications are insisting that their staff members be persons with a broad 
educational background. The day of the practitioner narrowly drilled in certain 
techniques and possessing only limited general culture is rapidly passing. As a 
result the modern school of journalism devotes 75 per cent of its curricula to studies 
that provide a comprehensive and authoritative education. 

Among the foundation courses that receive special attention are these: the 
English language and literature; modern foreign language (Spanish, German, and 
French recommended, in that order) ; theoretical and applied economics, and business 
administration; national, state, and local government and the government systems of 
foreign countries; American politics and international relations; the problems of 
management and labor and their social implications; American and European 
history; philosophy, psychology, and natural science. Persons capable of producing 
newspapers or broadcasting news events and their interpretation with which today's 
readers and listeners will be satisfied must be thoroughly informed about all aspects 
of the modern world. They must also know the art and science of the best journalistic 
practice. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN JOURNALISM 

A candidate who has satisfied all general requirements of the University and who 
as a regularly enrolled student of the School of Journalism has earned 64 semester 
hours of credit of a value specified later in the Scholarship section and in the subjects 
listed in one of the professional curricula hereinafter outlined will be recommended 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism, provided the combined number 
of his credits acquired as a pre-journalism student and as a regularly enrolled journal- 
ism major totals no fewer than 128. As a minimum professional requirement, 25 of the 
64 semester credits earned after the student has enrolled in the school must be obtained 
in journalism subjects. Moreover, no fewer than 60 of the 64 hours mentioned above 
shall be obtained in courses numbered between 100 and 300. 



THE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM 303 



Foreign Languages 

To be eligible for graduation, a student must have completed 12 semester hours 
in one language or 6 semester hours in each of two foreign languages in college; or 
he must have offered 2 units in a modern foreign language for entrance and must 
have completed 6 hours in the same language in college. 

Laboratory Sciences 

A candidate for the degree must have acquired 8 hours in one of the following 
laboratory sciences: biology, botany, chemistry, geology, physics, psychology, and 
zoology. 

Maximum and Minimum Work 

During each semester a regular student may register for no fewer than fourteen 
and no more than eighteen hours. To obtain permission to carry eighteen hours, a 
student must have maintained an average in all subjects of "B" or higher during the 
preceding semester. Variations from the foregoing rule will be allowed only on 
recommendation of the School's Committee on Scholarship. 

Exemptions from Requirements 

Exemption from any professional course because of practical newspaper experience 
that a student may have had will be granted only after the student has submitted 
satisfactory evidence as to the nature and quality of the experience. For such exemp- 
tions approved advanced courses shall be substituted. Credit toward a degree can be 
granted for practical work only when it has been done under the supervision of an 
accredited instructor. 

Professional Adviser 

The director of the School of Journalism is the general adviser for all journalism 
students. Not only juniors and seniors but pre-journalism freshmen and sophomores 
should consult him about all scholastic and curricular problems that may arise. 

THE MINOR FIELD 

Since the prospective newspaper, radio or industrial-journalism worker needs the 
broadest and most thorough education possible, he will find his opportunities and 
usefulness enlarged if while in the professional school he devotes himself to a second 
field of concentration. To meet the requirements for a minor, he must earn at least 
twelve semester hours of credit in some other subjects than journalism, nine of which 
must be in the junior and senior courses. 

Minors especially recommended for journalism students are business administra- 
tion, economics, education, English, history, political science, and sociology. Since 
there is a growing demand for journalistic writers who can interpret developments 
in agriculture, astronomy, chemistry, home economics, physics, and other related 
subjects, students with sufficient technical background will be encouraged to select 
a minor in one of these scientific fields. 

SCHOLARSHIP 

Graduates of the School of Journalism are expected to be not only citizens of 
good manners, of honorable and upright character, and of respect for other people 
and their ideas, but alert individuals of better-than-average intellectual attainments. 
It is urged, therefore, that all candidates for a degree aspire to earn at least three times 
as many grade points as they have credit hours. To be eligible for graduation, a 
student must earn as a minimum during the junior and senior years an average of 
2i/ 2 grade points for every semester hour of required courses. 



304 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



GRADUATE STUDY 

Although at the present time the School of Journalism is devoting its instructional 
facilities chiefly to professional curricula that lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Journalism, it frequently provides a graduate minor for students taking the 
Master's Degree in a field of specialization related to journalism. 

PRE-JOURNALISM CURRICULUM 

With the view of moving directly toward established objectives, the School of 
Journalism assists the student during his freshman and sophomore years by designating 
several of the courses for which he should enroll. In arranging his schedule each 
semester, the student will be provided with competent advisory service under the 
supervision of the director. Juniors and seniors who have been admitted to the 
professional curricula will register in the School of Journalism. 

FIRST YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Eng. 1— Comp. and Rhet 3 Eng. 2— Comp. and Rhet 3 

Hist. 1— Europe to 1815 3 Hist. 2— Europe since 1815 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

Foreign language 3 Foreign language 3 

Jour. 1— Intro, to U.S. Jour 1 Jour. 2— Intro, to Reporting Skills.. 1 

Phys. ed. (men and women) 1 Phys. ed. (men and women) 1 

Mil. or Air 2 Mil. or Air 2 

Electives 0-2 Electives 0-2 



Maximum hr. allowed 16-17 16-17 

SECOND YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Jour. 11— Newspaper Report 3 Jour. 12— Newspaper Report 3 

Hist. 52-Hist. of U. S 3 Hist. 53-Hist. of U. S 3 

Foreign language (if needed) 3 Foreign language (if needed) 3 

Eng. 6— American Literature* 3 Eng. 4— English Literature* 3 

Econ. 1— Prin. of Econ 3 Econ. 2— Prin. of Econ 3 

Psych. 1-Intro. to Psych.f 3 Pol. Sci. 5-Am. Fed. System 3 

Mil. or Air 2 Mil. or Air 2 

Phys. Ed. (women) 1 Phys. Ed. (women) 1 

Electives} 0-4 Electives} 0-4 

Maximum hr. allowed 16-17 16-17 

CURRICULA 

The School of Journalism offers three curricula designed to fit students for special- 
ized branches of journalism practice or for occupations or professions for which journal- 
istic training is desirable or necessary preparation. Each sequence leads to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in - Journalism. 

*Majors unable to schedule Eng. 4 and Eng. 6 in their sophomore year will be 
required to take them in their junior year. 

tA sophomore expecting to become a high-school teacher will choose an 
elective in his intended teaching field as a substitute for Psychology 1, and in 
his junior year will take Education 105, "Educational Psychology." 

jBecause of the growing demand for graduates trained for advertising, pro- 
motion, circulation, and other positions in the business department of newspapers, 
sophomores are permitted to elect Jour. 110, "Newspaper Typography," or Jour. 113, 
"Principles of Advertising," or both, if their schedules will permit. Because of 
the increasing public interest in radio journalism, sophomores may also elect 
Jour. 122, "Elements of Radio Journalism," provided their schedules will permit. 



THE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM 



305 



NEWS-EDITORIAL CURRICULUM 

The news-editorial sequence is designed primarily for the student who wishes to 
prepare himself for work as a reporter, copyreader, special writer, or departmental 
editor and who hopes to advance later to a still more responsible position in the 
general news and editorial field. 



THIRD YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Jour. 103— Copy Editing 3 

Jour. 105— Applied Newspaper 

Management 3 

Jour. 127— Hist, of American 

Jour 3 

Jour. 113— Principles of Advertising.. 3 
Pol. Sci. 106— Amer. State and 

Local Government 3 

Electives 1-3 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Jour. 104— Copy Editing 3 

Soc. 102— Intro, to Sociology 3 

Jour. 220— Newspaper and 

Magazine Article Writing 3 

Eng. 142— Shakespeare, or Eng. 259 

—Dramatic Art of Shakespeare 3 

Advanced Political Science 3 

Electives 4-6 



Mamixum hr. allowed 16-18 



16-18 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Jour. 230— Editorial Writing and 

Policv 3 

Jour. 221 -Critical Writing 2 

Eng. 180 or Eng. 181 — 

Bible Literature 3 

Phil. 104— Intro, to Philosophy 3 

Jour. 110— Newspaper Typography .. 2 
Electives 3-5 

Maximum hr. allowed 16-18 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Jour. 231— Social Responsibility 

of Journalism 3 

Jour. 128— Adv. Reporting 3 

Jour. 210— Law of the Press 2 

Advanced social science or 

literature or language 3-7 

Electives 8-10 



16-18 



ADVERTISING-MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM 

The advertising-management professional sequence is arranged for the student 
who expects to enter some branch of the business department of a newspaper and 
who looks forward sooner or later to the management or ownership of a pub- 
lication. Opportunities in the business department are considered even better than 
in tbe news-editorial branch. * 



THIRD 

First Sem. Hr. 

Jour. 105— Applied Newspaper 

Management 3 

Jour. 1 10— Newspaper Typography .. 2 

Jouv. 112-Public Relations 2 

Jour. 113— Principles of Advertising.. 3 
Pol. Sci. 106— Amer. State and 

Local Government 3 

Acct. 1— Principles of Accounting ... 3 
Electives 0-2 

Maximum hr. allowed 16-18 



YEAR 

Second Sem. Hr. 

Jour. 115— Advertising Layout 

and Copy 2 

Jour. 103— Copy Editing 3 

Jour. 114— Applied Advertising Sales 4 
Geol. 109— Economic Geography or 
Geol. 116— Geography of North 

America 3 

Acct. 2— Principles of Accounting .... 3 
Electives 1-3 



[6-18 



306 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Sem. Hr. 

Jour. 230— Editorial Writing and 

Policy 3 

Eng. 142— Shakespeare, or 

Eng. 259— Dramatic Art of 

Shakespeare, or Eng. 180, 

or Eng. 181— Bible Literature .... 3 

Soc. 102— Intro, to Sociology 3 

Economics and Business 

Administration* 7-9 

Maximum hr. allowed 16-18 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Jour. 108— Community Newspaper . . 2 
Jour. 231— Social Rseponsibility 

of Journalism 3 

Jour. 128— Adv. Reporting 3 

Jour. 210— Law of the Press 2 

Pol. Sci. 107-Amer. City Gov't 3 

Econ. and Bus. Administration* ..3-5 



16-18 



GENERAL CURRICULUM 

The general curriculum is planned for the following classes of majors: 

A. Those wishing to make journalism a special field of concentration while 
getting a broad, general education of modern content. 

B. Those expecting to follow radio journalism as a career. 

C. Those preparing to take a position in high school as teacher of journalism, 
English, and social sciences and as director of student publications. 

D. Those looking forward to work on specialized business and trade periodicals, 
on household magazines and newspaper women's pages, or on agricultural and 
scientific publications. 

E. Those desiring to be public-relations writers or directors or to enter the 
federal or state civil service. 

F. Those fitting themselves for secretaries or assistants to executives. 



First Sem. 

Jour. 112— Public Relations 

Jour. 113— Principles of Advertising 
Jour. 122— Elements of Radio Jour. . 
jour. 127— Hist, of Amer. 

Journalism 

Pol. Sci. 106— Amer. State and 

Local Government 

Electives in secorW field 

of concentrationt 



THIRD YEAR 

Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

. 2 Jour. 103-Copy Editing** 3 

. 3 Jour. 220— Newspaper and Magazine 

. 2 Article Writing 3 

Soc. 102— Intro, to Sociology 3 

. 3 Geol. 109— Economic Geography, or 

Geol. 116— Geography of North 

. 3 America 3 

Electives in second field 
3-5 of concentrationt 4-6 



Maximum hr. allowed 16-18 



16-18 



*Courses in economics and business administration especially recommended for 
students pursuing- the Advertising-Management Curriculum are: Mark. Ill, "Prin- 
ciples of Marketing-"; Mark. 115, "Principles of Retailing"; Bus. Law 111, "Business 
Law"; Econ. 125, "Statistics"; Econ. 115, "Labor Problems.'" 

**Students following sequences A, C, or D in the General Curriculum are 
required to take Jour. 104, the second half of the "Copy Editing," since their 
future work may require a thorough knowledge of all aspects of the makeup 
and layout of pages. 



THE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM 307 



FOURTH YEAR 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Jour. 230-Editorial Writing and Jour. 108— Community Newspaper . . 2 

Policy 3 Jour. 128— Adv. Reporting 3 

Jour. 221 -Critical Writing or ' Jour. 231 -Social Rseponsibility 

Advanced Eng. Composition 2 of Journalism 3 

Jour. 120— News-Photography, or Electives in second field 

Jour. 110, Newspaper Typography 2 of concentration! 8-10 

Phil. 104— Intro, to Philosophy 3 

Eng. 142— Shakespeare, or 

Eng. 259— Dramatic Art 

of Shakespeare 3 

Electives in second field 

of concentration! 3-5 

Maximum hr. allowed 16-18 16-18 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Abbreviations used in the announcements have the following meanings: I, a 
course given the first semester; II, a course given the second semester; S, a course 
given either the first or the second term of the Summer Session or both; I, II, S, 
a course given each semester and during the Summer Session; hr., number of 
credit hours per course; PR: prerequisite. 

The following system of course numbering is employed: Courses 1-99, intended 
primarily for freshmen and sophomores; courses 100-199, intended primarily for 
juniors and seniors; courses 200-299, advanced courses open to juniors, seniors, and 
graduate students. 

1. Introduction to United States Journalism. I. 1 hr. Required of pre- 
journalism freshmen and open to others. Staff 

2. Introduction to Reporting Skills. II. 1 hr. PR: English 1 with a grade of 
"C" or higher. Newspaper vocabulary, words difficult to spell, newspaper 
paragraphing, sentence beginnings, position of explanatory matter, copy con- 
densation, newspaper analysis for identifying techniques, basic principles in 
interviewing, style sheet, and avoidance of the commonest errors in journalistic 
writing. Required of pre-journalism freshmen and open to others. 

Mr. Bond and Mr. Krakowski 

11. Newspaper Reporting. I, II. 3 hr. PR: English 1 and 2, with an average 
of 2.5 or higher for the two courses: Two lectures and three laboratory hours. 
Students are required to know how to use a typewriter. 

Mr. Bond and Mr. Krakowski 

12. Newspaper Reporting. I, II. 3 hr. Two lectures and three laboratory hours. 
Continuation of Journalism 11, which is prerequisite. Mr. Bond 



tin his second field of concentration a student pursuing- the General Curricu- 
lum must acquire before graduation at least 18 hours of credit in subjects bearing 
directly on his contemplated vocation other than newspaper work proper. In 
Sequence A, he will acquire approximately a double minor (at least 15 hours in 
courses between 100 and 300) in some traditional liberal-arts subject. In Sequence 

B, he will give special attention to newscasting, news commentary, continuity 
writing, program building, commercial copywriting, and radio advertising. He 
will also include courses in voice and diction and in radio announcing. In Sequence 

C, he will take 20 hours of professional education courses. In Sequence D, he will 
include advertising, marketing, finance, business law, labor relations, personnel 
management, business communications, and. if possible, statistics. In Sequence E, 
he will include psychology of advertising in industry, elements of marketing, 
labor relations, political parties and public opinion, American economic history 
and, if possible, statistics. In Sequence F, he will include business mathematics, 
business communications, secretarial training, a year of shorthand, and other 
similar courses adapted to his anticipated vocational need. 



308 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



103. Copy Editing. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Journalism 11 and 12 or consent of instructor. 

Mr. Kidd 

104. Copy Editing. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Journalism 103 or consent of instructor. Mr. Kidd 

105. Applied Newspaper Management. I. 3 hr. PR: Journalism 11 and 12 or consent 
of instructor. Two lectures and two laboratory hours. Mr. Summers 

108. The Community Newspaper. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Journalism 11 and 12 or consent 
of instructor. One lecture and two laboratory hours. Mr. Summers 

110. Newspaper Typography. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Journalism 11 and 12 or consent 
^ of instructor. One lecture and two laboratory hours. Mr. Summers 

blic Relations. I, S. 2 hr. Mr. Krakowski 



4J ** ^ 



113. Principles of Advertising. I, II. 3 hr. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
period. Mr. Summers 

114. Applied Advertising Sales. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Jour. 113. Practical application of 
advertising principles, with stress on newspaper advertising. Selling of space, 
preparing retail copy and otherwise servicing local newspaper accounts. Two 
lecture and conference hours and five laboratory hours a week. Limited en- 
rollment. Mr. Summers 

115. Advertising Layout and Copy. II. 2 hr. PR: Jour. 113. Theory and practice 
of effective layout and copy for newspaper advertising. Scientific advertising 
planning for the local merchant. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory 

. . period. Mr. Summers 

/2 /S^3 tIE £DY± ■■ 

120. News Photography. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: Journalism 11 and 12 or consent of 
instructor. One lecture hour and one demonstration hour; a two-hour lab- 
oratorv, to be arranged individually. Mr. Bond 

//*, Alt • CAL 



1*3 



122. linmir.iiT^ifcfibaairi Jtnmiiu inr. I, S. 2 hr. PR: Journalism 11 and 12 or consent 
/ /of instructor. One lecture and two laboratory hours. Mr. Krakowski 

123. Advanced Radio Writing. II. 2 hr. PR: Journalism 11 and 12 and Journalism 
122 or consent of instructor. One lecture and two laboratory hours. 

Mr. Krakowski 
125. Industrial Journalism. II. 2 hr. PR: Jour. 112 or its equivalent. This 
course treats the relations of industry to its many publics and the use of 
internal and external publications as public-relations media. A critical study 
of the production of industrial publications is made, followed by extensive 
practice. Mr. Krakowski 

127. History of American Journalism. I. 3 hr. PR: Hist. 52 and Hist. 53. 
^ (i**. Mr. Bond 

128. iVdvamceu RcrORfSHC . I, II. 3 hi. For juniors and seniors in journalism. 

. Mr. Bond 
210. Law of the Press. II, S. 2 hr. For journalism seniors and graduates, or con- 
sent of instructor. Mr. Bond 

215. High-school Journalism and Student Publications. II, S. 2 hr. For seniors 
and graduates. Mr. Bond 

220. Newspaper and Magazine Article Writing. II, S. 3 hr. For juniors, seniors, 
and graduates. Mr. Kidd and Md. Reed 

221. Journalistic Critical Writing. I. 2 hr. For seniors and graduates. 

Mr. Reed 

230. Editorial Writing and Policy. I. 3 hr. For seniors and graduates. 

Mr. Kidd and Mr. Reed 

231. Social Responsibility of Journalism. II, S. 3 hr. For seniors and graduates. 

Mr. Reed 



The College of Law 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

The College of Law, established in 1878, is the oldest professional school in 
the University. 

In 1897 the course of study was increased from one year to two years. Since 
1912 the degree of Bachelor of Laws has been conferred only upon satisfactory 
completion of three years of law-school work. From 1913 to 1924 the requirement 
for admission was one year of college work; from 1924 to 1931 the requirement was 
two years. Since 1931 the minimum pre-law requirement for the degree has 
been three years of work of collegiate grade in an institution of approved standing. 

In 1914 the College of Law was admitted to membership in the Association 
of American Law Schools, which is an organization of leading schools for the 
purpose of maintaining high standards in legal education. The College of Law 
also is on the list of schools approved by the American Bar Association. 

The Law Building 

The College of Law occupies a fireproof building, elected for its use in 1923. 
The building is three stories high. It contains two classrooms and a practice- 
court room, as well as private offices for each member of the staff. The library has a 
reading room accommodating the entire student body. In addition, the building 
has a locker room and club rooms for the students. 

The Law Library 

The Law Library contains more than 53,000 volumes. It includes reports 
of the highest courts of all states, insular possessions, and the District of Columbia, 
with the exception of a few volumes no longer obtainable, together with published 
reports of the lower courts of various states; the National Reporter System, and 
reports of the Federal courts and commissions; selections of annotated cases; the 
American and the English encyclopedias of law; the American Digest. It also 
contains reports of the English courts, as contained in the English Reprint and the 
Law Reports, as well as the Irish reports, the Scotch reports, and the more im- 
portant Canadian and Australian reports; the English statutes and the statutes of 
the various states, as well as Federal statutorv material, including more modern 
codes and compilations; a complete collection of codes and session laws of the Vir- 
ginias from the time of early settlers; treatises and textbooks, representative fairly 
of the legal literature dealing with common law and with civil law, including a large 
amount of old English historical material. 

In addition to these, there are legal periodicals and an extensive collection 
of bar-association reports and legal miscellany; briefs and records of cases decided 
by the Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia, now totaling more than 1,200 
volumes, together with briefs and records of the more recent cases in the Circuit 
Court of Appeals of the United States for the Fourth Circuit. 

Admission to the Bar 

Under the provisions of the West Virginia Code 1931, ch. 30, art 2, sec. 1, 
those who receive the degree of Bachelor of Laws from West Virginia Uni- 
versity may be remitted to the bar without further examination. 

All persons seeking admission to the West Virginia bar, except those who 
hold the degree of Bachelor of Laws from West Virginia University, are required 
to pass the state bar examination. 

309 



310 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Information as to the bar examinations and as to other matters relating to 
admission to the bar may be obtained upon inquiry directed to the Secretary, 
State Board of Law Examiners, Charleston, West Virginia. 

The West Virginia Law Review 

The West Virginia Law Review is published in December, February, April, and 
June by the College of Law. It is the official publication of the West Virginia Bar 
Association. 

The editors of the Student Note and Recent Case Department of the Law 
Review are members of the second- and third-year classes, chosen each year from 
those students who made the highest grades in the preceding year. This department 
affords to students an opportunity to do research work of a practical nature. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Irregular Students 

A limited number of students with less than the academic credit required 
of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws will be admitted under the 
following conditions: 

(1) If they have credit for no less than two years of work of collegiate grade 
in an institution of approved standing, or if they present a statement from the 
West Virginia State Board of Law Examiners certifying that they have satisfied 
the prelegal educational requirements of the Board; 

(2) If they are at least 23 years of age; 

(3) If they present some good reason, acceptable to the Scholarship Com- 
mittee, indicating that their experience and training have especially equipped 
them to engage successfully in the study of law, despite lack of the required college 
credits. 

An applicant who has been admitted as an irregular student and who, since 
his admission, has completed all the requirements for admission as a regular 
student, may upon the satisfactory completion of one full year of work in the 
College of Law, apply to the Scholarship Committee for permission to be granted 
the status of a regular student and to be given credit for law school work of a 
"C" grade or better taken while he was an irregular student. 

Students in Other Colleges 

Students of at least senior standing in other colleges or schools of the University 
may be permitted to take work in the College of Law subject to the regulations of 
the units where they are registered and of the College of Law, but conditioned in 
each case upon the consent of the instructor giving the course which such students 
desire to take. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

BACHELOR OF LAWS 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws is conferred upon those who have met the 
tequirements for entrance to the College of Law as candidates for this degree 
and who have satisfactorily passed examinations in courses aggregating eighty-one 
credit hours, distributed over three years' residence. They must also have obtained 
an average grade of "C" as hereinafter provided. Except with the permission of 
the Scholarship Committee these eighty-one hours must be taken in no more than 
six semesters or the equivalent thereof in summer school, and the last twenty- 
seven hours of work must be taken in the College of Law of West Virginia Uni- 
versity. When a student, because of admission with advanced standing from an- 
other law school, needs less than eighty-one hours in order to satisfy the re- 
quirements for this degree, the "C" average required for graduation is computed on 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 311 



the basis of work taken in the College of Law. No student may receive the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws without at least three semesters in residence at the 
College of Law and the successful completion of courses aggregating at least one-half 
of the total number of hours required for graduation. Candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws, entering the College of Law after September 1, 1953, shall be 
required to pass the proficiency examination in English given by the English Pro- 
ficiency Board of the University. 

COMBINED DEGREES: A.B. AND LL.B. 

Students who have satisfied the minimum requirements for admission to the 
College of Law and have also completed 12 hours of work in a major and 9 hours 
in a minor, together with sufficient electives to amount to 96 hours, may be ad- 
mitted as candidates for the combined degrees. The successful completion of the 
entire first year of work in the College of Law will satisfy remaining requirements 
for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Two additional years of work in the College 
of Law are required for the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION 

It is the primary aim of the College of Law to give the student an adequate 
preparation for the practice of law. This involves not merely imparting a knowledge 
of the legal rules and other materials which courts and administrative tribunals 
employ, but also, what is equally important, a training in the techniques of legal 
thinking and, so far as it is feasible to do so, in the practical skills of the profession. 
Some courses are especially designed to acquaint the student with the realities of 
practice, including the drafting of legal instruments and personal participation in 
the trial of cases in Practice Court. To the extent that it is practicable to do so, cases 
are tried in Practice Court exactly as they would be tried in an ordinary court. 
General information as to the nature of the training to be acquired in Practice Court 
and in the prerequisite course on Practice and Procedure is set forth infra under 
Description of Courses. 

In most courses the work of the student is based chiefly upon the study and 
discussion of decided cases and statutes, with collateral reading of textbooks and 
periodicals, elucidated by free discussion in class. In all courses special emphasis is 
given to those West Virginia cases, statutes and procedures that differ from the general 
law. Thus, although it is an aim of this College to give to West Virginia students a 
training which is not available at any other law school, it is at the same time a 
fundamental objective of this College to give every student such a general and 
practical legal training that he will be adequately qualified to practice law in any 
other state. 

, The over-all objective of the College of Law connotes, among other things, an 
attempt to train the student to discover and solve the ever-varying problems which 
constantly confront lawyers, courts and administrative tribunals; and this, in essence, 
envisions cultivating in the student a capacity to think intensely and inquiringly, an 
ability to make searching analyses of complex fact situations which will disclose the 
legal questions involved therein, an imaginative resourcefulness in ascertaining possible 
solutions, a will and patience to investigate their validity and practicability, and a 
determination not only to take nothing for granted but to act conscientiously and 
courageously on his own considered judgment. This also involves an effort to 
inculcate in the student an appreciation of the lawyer's responsibility to his client 
and to society, and an understanding of the grave dangers inherent in any infringe- 
ment of the ethical standards of the profession. 

The following program of instruction is designed with these ends in view. The 
following courses are required^ All first-year courses, Common Law Pleading, Equity 
II, Evidence (including Examination of Witnesses) , Practice and Procedure, Practice 
Court, and Taxation (students are required to have completed either Constitutional 

9TJnder very exceptional circumstances, the Scholarship Committee may- 
exempt a student from taking a required course. 



312 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Law or Administrative Law prior to taking the examination in Taxation). All other 
courses are elective. Neither fewer than 13 nor more than 16 hours may be carried 
without the consent of the Committee on Scholarship. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



The folk wing abbreviations are used in the description and schedule of courses: 

I— a course offered during the first semester 

II— a course offered during the second semester 
I, II— a course offered during the first and second semesters 
PR: — prerequisite 

R— required 

102. Common Law Remedies. I. 2 hr. R. Introduction to the judicial process and 
organization of courts; the development and present effect of common law 
actions, including trespass, trespass on the case, detinue, replevin, ejectment, 
account, covenant, debt and assumpsit. The course also deals with the relief 
available in unlawful entry and detainer as well as in the extraordinary remedies 
of mandamus, prohibition, quo warranto, information in nature of quo 
warranto, certiorari, habeas corpus, and by injunction. When time permits, a 
general discussion of the application of statutes of limitations is included. Cook, 
Readings on Forms of Action at Common Law. 

103-4. Contracts. I, II. 6 hr. R. The general principles of substantive law relating to 
contracts, formal and informal. The creation of simple contracts by offer and 
acceptance; consideration, Statute of Frauds, joint obligations, third-party 
beneficiary contracts, assignment of contractual rights and delegation of duties; 
conditions, performance and breach, excuses for nonperformance, impossibility 
of performance; discharge of contractual duties, and illegal contracts. Williston, 
Cases on Contracts, 5th ed., A. L. I. Restatement of Contracts. 

105-6. Criminal Law and Procedure. II. 4 hr. R. Elements of crime generally and 
defenses thereto, with detailed consideration of various specific crimes, including 
homicide, assaults, rape, larceny, embezzlement, false pretenses, robbery, burglary, 
and receiving stolen property, and with general consideration of the elements 
of other crimes; conspiracy, solicitation, and attempts; parties to crimes, criminal 
procedure at common law, with emphasis on West Virginia procedure, including 
jurisdiction, venue, preliminary examination, grand jury, indictments, pleas, 
trial and sentence; entrapment, a rest, and double jeopardy. Perkins, Cases and 
Materials on Criminal Law and i ocedure. 

210. Equity I. II. 3 hr. R. This course covers the nature and principles of equity 
jurisdiction; operation and enforcement of equitable decrees; decrees as to 
property, suits and acts in other states; specific relief against torts, including 
relief against waste, trespass, nuisances, interference with business rights, defama- 
tion, and injuries to personality; bases and forms of relief against torts; effect 
of criminal law on equitable relief; defenses to specific relief. Time available 
usually permits some consideration of the special equitable remedies. In this 
course special attention is given to bills of interpleader and bills in the nature 
of bills of interpleader, both in state and iedeial courts. As to other special 
equitable remedies, see Equity II. Chafee and Simpson, Cases on Equity, 2d ed. 

107. Personal Property. I. 2 hr. R. A miscellaneous survey of the law pertaining to 
personal property not treated specifically in other courses, including the general 
concept of property and distinctions between real and personal property; the 
elements, acquisition and legal significance of possession; finding; bailments; liens, 
pledges; acquisition of ownership by bona fide purchase, adverse possession, 
accession, confusion, judgment, satisfaction of judgment and gift; fixtures; 
emblements. Bigelow, Cases on Personal Ptoperty, 3d ed. 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 313 



108. Property I. I. 4 hr. R. The course deals with the modern land law of the United 
States and of West Virginia in particular. The historical background of real 
property, the types of estates in land, concurrent ownership, conveyancing and 
future interests before the Statute of Uses (1536) , the Statute of Uses and its 
consequences are covered in the initial weeks of the course by text and problems 
with a few modern cases to illustrate the slow demise of ancient, out-moded 
property rules. The major portion of the course consists of three parts: (1) 
the modern land transaction which is concerned with the Statute of Frauds, 
the contract for the sale of land, marketable title, status of vendor and purchaser 
and problems in equitable conversion, the mortgage, the deed, delivery in 
escrow, description of the land, covenants for title, recording acts and significance 
of failure to record, record notice, inquiry notice, definition of a bona fide 
purchaser for value, the Torrens System and title insurance; (2) controlling the 
use of land which deals with legislation restricting the use of land and con- 
stitutional limitations thereon, covenants, conditions, construction of covenants, 
unenforceable covenants, and the running of the benefit and burden of covenants; 
and (3) easements, licensing, rights of lateral and subjacent support, water 
rights, and adverse possession. The casebook contains chapters of text on 
taxes and insurance for property lawyers which the student is expected to master 
outside of class. Casner and Leach, Cases and Text on Property. 

109-110. Torts. I, II. 5 hr. R. Liability for intentional and unintentional acts. 
Includes assault and battery; false imprisonment, privileged acts, negligence; 
causation; strict liability; deceit; defamation, and invasion of right of privacy. 
Seavey, Keeton and Thurston, Cases on Torts. 

232. Use of Law Books. II. 1 hr. R. Text assignments with accompanying problems, 
demanding use of the Law Library, familiarize the student with the kinds of 
published materials used in seeking solutions for legal problems with the ways 
of using them. Weisiger and Davies, Manual for the Use of Law Books. 

SECOND AND THIRD YEARS 

111. Accounting for Lawyers. I. 2 hr. The course is designed for students with no 
previous training in accounting and has as its objective the preparation of a 
young lawyer for collaboration with accountants in such problems as require 
the work of both professions for a solution. The principles of elementary book- 
keeping are considered only insofar as it is necessary to enable the student to 
grasp the more fundamental questions of accounting policy. The major portion 
of the course concerns the application of sound accounting principles to the 
problems of periodic determination of revenue, matching costs and revenues, 
inventory methods, valuation of tangible and intangible assets, depreciation and 
amortization, surplus and reserves, analysis of financial statements, and con- 
solidated financial statements. Practical problems are regularly assigned for 
outside work throughout the term. Amory, Materials on Accounting, and Mason, 
Fundamentals of Accounting. 

201. Administrative Law. II. 4 hr. A comprehensive outline of agency procedures 
rather than intensive study of any particular agency. Attention is directed 
primarily though not exclusively to federal agencies. The administrative process 
itself, including the operation of the Administrative Procedure Act, receives 
primary emphasis in an effort to qualify students for effective client representa- 
tion in dealing with the agencies. Judicial and other outside controls of agency 
action are studied and the extent to which constitutional limitations apply is 
touched on. Davis, Cases on Administrative Law. 

202. Coal, Oil and Gas. II. 3 hr. Nature of ownership of these subsurface minerals; 
methods of transferring the ownership thereof; exploitation by means of leases; 
protection from damage against wrongful taking thereof; partition among co- 
owners; analysis of leasehold estates, the habendum clause, the drilling clause, 
lessee's duty of development, assignment of leases and transfers of the reversion; 
rents and royalties; tort liabilities in connection with operation; coal mining 
rights and privileges. Summers, Cases on Oil and Gas. 



314 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



203. Common Law Pleading. II. 4 hr. R. A comprehensive review of the system 
developed by the common law and by statute for the purpose of forming issues 
of law and issues of fact for trials in common law actions. The demurrer, 
producing an issue of law, receives first consideration because it is the mechan- 
ism by which the sufficiency of all the other pleadings, leading to issues of fact, 
is determined. The declaration, which states the plaintiff's cause of action and 
is the initial pleading in the case, receives extensive consideration because the 
cases dealing with it are intended not only to define the formal and substantial 
requisites of allegations stating causes of action in the whole contract and tort 
fields, but also to illustrate the general rules of pleading. A study of the plea, 
in which the defendant asserts matters of fact as a defense to the cause of action 
alleged in the declaration, begins with consideration of general principles relating 
to pleas and continues with an examination of the specific requisites of the 
various kinds of pleas; the three classes of traverses; pleas in confession and 
avoidance; pleas in estoppel; pleas of setoff and recoupment; and pleas in 
abatement. The replication and subsequent pleadings require little attention, 
but the new assignment, which comes at the replication stage, and the departure, 
which may come at or after the replication stage, receive particular consideration. 
Thereafter, amendment, aider by verdict, and repleader are dealt with as 
separate topics. Parties to actions and the consequences of nonjoinder and mis- 
joinder of parties receive attention in the concluding topic. Particular emphasis 
is given to West Virginia statutes, court rules and decisions. Sunderland, Cases 
on Common Law Pleading, 2d ed. 

204. Conflict of Laws. II. 3 hr. This course deals with the legal problems arising 
when an occurrence cuts across state or national boundaries. Emphasis is 
placed upon the problem of choice of law to be applied in the given situation 
where the laws of the states involved differ. The problems studied involve 
questions of domicile, jurisdiction of courts, foreign judgments, wrongs, con- 
tracts, property, governmental activities, family law, administration of estates, 
partnerships, associations, and corporations. Cheatham, Goodrich, Griswold, 
and Reese, Cases and Materials on Conflict of Laws, 3d ed. 

205. Constitutional Law. I. 4 hr. The course aims to impart an understanding of 
the role of the Federal Constitution in relation to individual liberties and to 
the federal system and of the judicial process in operation as exemplified in 
constitutional decisions. The focus is on the commerce and the due process 
clauses almost exclusively. The materials assigned for study consist of the full 
text of the original reports of selected cases. 

206. Corporations. II. 4 hr. The law of business corporations including formation 
of such corporations; corporate powers and their distribution between share- 
holders, directors, officers and agents, and the manner of exercising such powers; 
creation and maintenance of corporate capital; the issuance and marketing of 
securities, and the rights of shareholders with respect to dividends. Dodd and 
Baker, Cases on Corporations, 2d ed. 

207. Creditors' Rights. II. 2 hr. Procedures for enforcing the rights of creditors. 
Individual procedures (execution, garnishment, suggestion and creditors' bills) ; 
fraud on creditors; collective procedures (general assignments, creditors' agree- 
ments, and bankruptcy). Durfee and Smith, Cases on Creditors' Rights, rev. ed. 

208. Damages. I. 2 hr. The course deals with the rules and principles of law applicable 
to the determination of the sum of money to be awarded to the plaintiff in a 
legal action brought to recover for the loss suffered by him as a result of some 
violation of his legal rights caused by the defendant. One-third of the course 
is alloted to the study of the rules and standards applicable generally, such as 
determination of value, requirement of certainty, recovery of interest and 
expenses of litigation, the doctrine of avoidable consequences, and credit for 
benefit accompanying injury. The next one-third deals with damages in tort 
actions and considers exemplary damages, injuries to the person, defamation and 
business disparagement, deceit, and injuries to the interests of owners of personal 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 315 



property and to the interests of landowners. The final one-third is devoted to 
a study of the rules and measures of damages for breach of contract. McCormick 
and Fritz, Cases and Materials on Damages. 

209. Drafting Legal Instruments. II. 1 hr. Students are required, using submitted 
data, to draft completely, as if to be submitted to a client, such fundamental 
instruments as deeds of conveyance, deeds of trust and leases. Variations in 
formalities of execution are emphasized, depending upon whether the parties 
involved are natural persons, partners or corporations, and whether the instru- 
ment is executed through the medium of an attorney in fact. Drafts are cor- 
rected and criticised. Major portions of the class hours are devoted to general 
discussions of legal principles and statutes pertinent to the various assignments. 

210. Equity II. II. 3 hr. R. This course deals largely with the specific performance 
of contracts, including consideration of the types of contracts as to which equity 
courts will grant relief, the extent to which the court will grant relief, the effect 
of such contracts on third persons (herein of equitable servitudes or restrictions 
on use of land), the consequences of the right to specific performance (herein 
of the effect of death of one or both of the parties to the contract or destruction 
of or damage to the property involved), relief where performance possible does 
not comply with the contract, relief where the contract does not comply with 
the Statute of Frauds, and various defenses to relief in equity, such as inadequacy 
of consideration, laches, misrepresentation, concealment, nondisclosure, mistake, 
hardship, and lack of mutuality. When time permits, consideration is given to 
certain special equitable remedies, such as bills of peace, cancellation of con- 
tracts, removal of cloud upon title, and declaratory judgments. As to inter- 
pleader, see Equity I. Chafee and Simpson, Cases on Equity, 2d ed. 

212. Equity Pleading and Practice. I. 2 hr. PR: Common Law Pleading. Principally, 
an exposition of the fundamental pleading devices developed by courts of 
equity for purposes of defining and deciding issues in an equity suit; including, 
on the plaintiff's side, the functions of a bill of complaint and a replication, and 
on the defendant's side, the functions of a demurrer, plea, answer, disclaimer 
and cross bill. Preliminary consideration is given to principles determining the 
proper parties to a suit in equity and the effects of nonjoinder and misjoinder 
of parties. Procedural topics include amendments; motions; petitions; testi- 
mony and hearing; masters in chancery; classification, correction, reversal and 
enforcement of decrees; equitable defenses in actions at law; appellate procedure. 
In all instances emphasis is placed on West Virginia statutes and decisions. 
Clephane, Equity Pleading and Practice, selected cases, statutes and lectures. 

213. Evidence. I. 4 hr. R. This course deals with the law of evidence in trials at 
common law and in equity, with collateral reference to proceedings before com- 
missions. The principal topics covered are judicial notice; burden of proof 
and presumptions; problems of relevancy, remoteness, undue prejudice, and the 
like; leading rules and principles of exclusion and selection; functions of judge 
and jury. (Topics relating to witnesses are dealt with in another course.) A 
considerable part of the classroom work deals with the handling of problems 
after the manner in which the problems would be handled in a trial court. 
Where the local law differs from the commonly accepted view r , special attention 
is given to the West Virginia law. Morgan and Maguire, Cases on Evidence, 3d 
ed., supplemented by required readings. 

214. Examination of Witnesses. II. 1 hr. R. A study of the materials and procedures 
dealing with form of testimony; perception and memory in connection with 
presentation of testimonial evidence; direct examination and matters incident 
thereto; cross-examination and matters incident thereto; redirect examination; 
discretion of the trial judge; competency and privilege. Where the local law 
differs from the general view, emphasis is placed on the West Virginia law. 
Morgan and Maguire, Cases on Evidence, 3d ed. 

215. Federal Courts. I. 3 hr. Jurisdiction and procedure in federal courts. Federal 
question and diversity jurisdiction; removal jurisdiction and procedure; the 
law applied in federal courts; venue, process, joinder of parties and actions, and 



316 CURRICULA AND COURSES 



trial of actions in federal courts. McCormick and Chadbourn, Cases on Federal 
Courts, 2d ed. 

219. Labor Law. II. 3 hr. Legality of labor objectives and of methods used to gain 
those objectives, such as strikes, picketing, and boycotts; organization and opera- 
tion of labor unions; the labor injunction, including the effect of legislation 
thereon; collective bargaining, the law and contracts resulting therefrom; em- 
ployer and union unfair labor practices; arbitration, mediation and conciliation. 
CCH Labor Law Course. 

220. Landlord and Tenant. II. 3 hr. Rights and liabilities of lessor and lessee. 
Includes the creation of landlord and tenant relation; creation and effect of 
express and implied covenants in leases; transfer of leasehold and reversionary 
estates; breach of covenants and conditions; and termination of landlord and 
tenant relation. Jacobs, Cases on Landlord and Tenant, 2d ed. 

237. Legal Ethics. II . 1 hr. The primary effort in this course is to bring to the 
attention of students the more prominent situations in which an attorney may 
be tempted to depart from standards of professional conduct and how such a 
departure is regarded by the Bench and the Bar. Attention is given to the 
following topics: supervision and discipline of lawyers; unauthorized practice 
of law; advertising; fees and charges; clients' confidential communications; 
representing conflicting interests; adverse interests of attorney and client; 
negligence, incompetence and mismanagement; clients' money; serving what 
clients by what means; relations of lawyers with judges, juries, witnesses and 
other lawyers; aiding unauthorized practice of law; the lawyer in private life. 
Students are required to read in full the Canons of Judicial and Professional 
Ethics. Hicks, Ethics of the Bench and Bar. 

221. Municipal Corporations. I. 2 hr. State-city relations; municipal powers (zoning, 
appropriation of funds and contracts) ; municipal liabilities (contract and tort) ; 
municipal finance (debt limitation and special assessments). Stason, Cases on 
Municipal Corporations, 2d ed. 

222. Negotiable Instruments. II. 3 hr. The law dealing with bills, notes, and checks 
is examined in conjunction with that concerning the relationship of banks with 
depositors and with other banks. The course aims to explain how our commercial 
credit arrangements operate and how claims based on such arrangements are 
created and protected. Aigler, Negotiable Paper and Banking. 

224. Persons. I. 2 hr. The law pertaining to the family, including marriage, annul- 
ment, divorce, alimony, custody, and other problems affecting persons in 
domestic relations. Compton, Cases on Domestic Relations. 

225. Practice and Procedure. I. 4 hr. R. PR: Common Law Pleading. This course 
is confined almost entirely to a consideration of West Virginia statutes and 
decisions. It deals primarily, in chronological order, with the fundamental 
procedural phases of a common law action: issuing, requisites and service of 
process; appearances; default procedure; continuances; the right to a jury trial 
and the processes by which a jury is selected; trial by the court when a jury is 
waived; right to open and close; objections and exceptions; order of proof; 
nonsuits; discontinuances and retraxit; demurrers to the evidence; motions 
to direct verdict; instructions to juries; argument of counsel; deliberations 
of the jury; verdicts; new trial and venire facias de novo; opening judg- 
ments and decrees; bills of exceptions; appellate procedure. Attention also 
is given to the statutory remedy of notice of motion for judgment, attachment, 
garnishment and suggestion. Special attention is given to the peculiar pro- 
cedure applying to preliminary injunctions and, occasionally and briefly, to 
other phases of equity procedure. 

226. Practice Court. II. 2 hr. R. PR: Common Law Pleading and Practice and 
Procedure. Students are given statements of facts, intended to approximate the 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 317 



information furnished by clients to counsel, on the basis of which counsel for 
plaintiffs are expected to select proper remedies and counsel for defendants 
are expected to interpose appropriate defenses. The court is called The University 
Court and performs the functions of a circuit court of the state. For purposes 
of venue, it may function as The University Court of any county in the state. 
Cases are litigated, from the issuance of process to final judgment or decree, 
as in actual practice. The presiding judges are judges of the various circuit 
courts and of the Supreme Court of Appeals of the state. Members of the class 
impersonate litigants and witnesses and serve as officers of the court. 

235. Public Utilities. II. 2 hr. This course deals chiefly with the control exercised 
by courts and commissions over public utility rates and services. Special 
attention will be given to problems in rate-making and in judicial review of 
rate regulations. Students will be required to prepare written papers as part 
of the work. Credit in the course will be based principally on the completion 
of an acceptable research paper. Selected materials. 

227. Quasi Contracts. I. 3 hr. The general principles governing noncontractual ob- 
ligations which, for purposes of remedy, are treated as if they were contractual 
obligations. Primarily, the remedy of assumpsit for the recovery of the monetary 
value of property, goods or services resulting in a pecuniary benefit to the 
defendant which it is unjust to retain. Benefits conferred under mistake, in the 
performance of a contract, in contracts within the Statute of Frauds, in con- 
tracts where further performance is impossible, in contracts which are illegal; 
benefits acquired under duress, under mistake of law, in the performance of the 
duty of another, and in the absence of any bargaining transaction between the 
parties; waiver of tort; analogous equitable relief by way of cancellation, reforma- 
tion and specific restitution. Thurston, Cases on Restitution. 

236. Real Property II. I, II. 5 hr. (a) Wills course, (b) Inter vivos transfers of real 
and personal property, outright and in trust; estate planning and practice; types 
and problems of future interests arising in construction of deeds and wills, 
especially gifts to classes, powers of appointment and the Rule against Perpetui- 
ties. Leach, Cases and Text on the Law of Wills, 2d ed.; Selected Essays on Wills 
and Future Interests (Harv. L. Rev.) ; Leach, Cases and Materials on the Law of 
Future Interests, 2d ed. 

238. Sales. II. 3 hr. The course deals with the law respecting the transfer of goods for 
a price, characteristic security arrangements incident to such transfers, and the 
rights, liabilities and remedies arising out of such transfers. The common law, 
the Uniform Conditional Sales Act, and other statutes of a kind in force in West 
Virginia are stressed although attention is also given to provisions of the Uniform 
Sales Act and relevant portions of the proposed Commercial Code. Lattin, 
Cases on Sales. (Omitted in 1953-54) . 

228. Secured Transactions. II. 3 hr. The course covers personal property security, 
suretyship, and real estate mortgages. It is designed to equip the lawyer to 
act as a business counsellor to those who extend personal and merchandise 
credit. Hanna, Cases and Materials on Security, re-edited 2d ed. 

229. Taxation. I. 4 hr. R. The course deals primarily with state property taxes and 
the federal income tax. West Virginia materials on the former are examined in 
detail. Practice in using a tax service and in the solution of representative tax 
problems such as would arise in ordinary office practice supplement the con- 
sideration of the law of income taxation. Magill and Maguire, Cases on Taxation, 
4th ed., and Students Tax Law Service. 

231. Trusts. I. 4 hr. The nature of a trust, its creation and elements; the transfer of 
a beneficiary's interest; the administration of trusts; the termination and modifi- 
cation of the trust; charitable trusts; liabilities to and liabilities of third persons; 
resulting and constructive trusts. Scott, Cases on Trusts, 4th ed. 



318 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



233. Wills. I. 1 hr. Problems arising in intestacy; statutory forced shares; execution, 
revocation and contest of wills; effect of extrinsic instruments and acts; results 
of mistakes and misdescriptions; lapse, ademption and satisfaction of gifts. Leach, 
Cases and Text on the Law of Wills, 2d ed., and Selected Essays on Wills and 
Future Intersts (Harv. L. Rev.) . 

SCHEDULE OF COURSES FOR 1953-5 I 10 

Casebooks or other materials to be used in these courses are indicated supra under 
Description of Courses. 

FIRST YEAR 

102. Common Law Remedies. I. 2 hr. R. Mr. Lugar 

103-4. Contracts. I, II. 6 hr. R. Mr. Donley 

105-6. Criminal Law and Procedure. II. 4 hr. R. Mr. Lugar 

210. Equity I. II. 3 hr. R. Mr. Colson 

107. Personal Property. I. 2 hr. R. Mr. Carlin 

108. Property I. I. 4 hr. R. Mr. Collins 
109-10. Torts. I, II. 5 hr. Mr. Brown 
232. Use of Law Books. II. 1 hr. R. Mr. Abel 



SECOND AND THIRD YEARS 

111. Accounting for Lawyers. I. 2 hr. Mr. Collins 

201. Administrative Law. II. 4 hr. Mr. Abel 

202. Coal, Oil and Gas. II. 3 hr. Mr. Donley 

203. Common Law Pleading. II. 4 hr. R. Mr. Carlin 

204. Conflict of Laws. II. 3 hr. Mr. Collins 

205. Constitutional Law. I. 4 hr. Mr. Abel 

206. Corporations II. 4 hr. Mr. Colson 

207. Creditors' Rights. II. 2 hr. Mr. Brown 

208. Damages. I. 2 hr. Mr. Collins 

209. Drafting Legal Instruments. II. 1 hr. Mr. Carlin 

210. Equity II. II. 3 hr. R. Mr. Lugar 

212. Equity Pleading and Practice. I. 2 hr. Mr. Carlin 

213. Evidence. I. 4 hr. R. Mr. Hardman 

214. Examination of Witnesses. II. 1 hr. R. Mr. Hardman 

215. Federal Courts. I. 3 hr. Mr. Brown 

219. Labor Law. II. 3 hr. Mr. Lugar 

220. Landlord and Tenant. II. 3 hr. Mr. Brown 
237. Legal Ethics. II. 1 hr. Mr. Carlin 

221. Municipal Corporations. I. 2 hr. Mr. Brown 
lOThe schedule of courses as given here is subject to change. 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 



319 



222. Negotiable Instruments. II. 3 hr. 

224. Persons. I. 2 hr. 

225. Practice and Procedure. I. 4 hr. R. 

226. Practice Court. II. 2 hr. R. 

235. Public Utilities. II. 2 hr. 

227. Quasi Contracts. I. 3 hr. 

236. Real Property II. I, II. 5 hr. 

228. Secured Transactions. II. 3 hr. 

229. Taxation. I. 4 hr. R. 
231. Trusts. I. 4 hr. 

233. Wills. I. 1 hr. 



Mr. Abel 
Mr. Colson 
Mr. Carlin 
Mr. Carlin 

Mr. Hardman 
Mr. Donley 

Mr. Highland 

Mr. Collins 

Mr. Abel 

Mr. Colson 

Mr. Highland 



The School of Medicine 



I. Curriculum In Medicine 

GENERAL INFORMATION 



During the years from 1868 to 1912 the University offered courses in pre- 
clinical medical subjects, the scope and designation of the program changing from 
time to time. In the earlier years a course was scheduled in anatomy, physiology, and 
hygiene; and in later years the work had grown to include the first two years of a 
standard medical curriculum. From 1903 to 1911 the University maintained a 
College of Medicine, giving the M.D. Degree. The first two years were given in 
Morgantown. Credit for the last two years was accepted from the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons of Baltimore, to which students transferred at the end of their second 
year. 

The School of Medicine as now organized had its beginning in 1912. Since that 
date it has given the first two years of the medical curriculum with no provision for 
students to transfer to any special school for the completion of their work until 1943, 
when an agreement was made with the Medical College of Virginia. 

Medical Curriculum 
first and second years 

The School of Medicine now gives only the first two years of the medical 
curriculum. It is listed as a Recognized School of Basic Medical Sciences by 
the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals of American Medical Associ- 
ation. It is also a member of the Association of American Medical Colleges. 
Inasmuch as only the first two years are given at West Virginia University, stu- 
dents must go elsewhere for the completion of the work for the M.D. Degree 
There are two possibilities as noted below. 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

The Medical College of Virginia. There is an agreement in operation with 
the Medical College of Virginia at Richmond for the transfer of as many as twenty-five 
students upon the completion of their second year at West Virginia University. 
At the Medical College of Virginia these students pay the same tuition as do 
residents of Virginia. Diplomas conferring the M.D. Degree are issued jointly 
by the two schools. The benefits of this agreement are available only to students 
who at the time of entering the medical curriculum had been residents of West 
Virginia for at least five years. 

Other Medical Schools. In each class there are also some students who, by private 
arrangement, transfer to other medical schools of their own choice for the comple- 
tion of the work. 

Proposed Expansion of Medical School 

The West Virginia Legislature in 1951 made provision for the expansion of the 
Medical School to include the four years required for the M.D. Degree. Training 
in dentistry and nursing also are to be included. It is too early to announce dates 
for the beginning of this program, inasmuch as the necessary planning and con- 
struction work will require many months. Until further announcement, the two-year 
curriculum will be continued as in recent years, 

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THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 321 



Clinical and Special Facilities 

The following institutions and agencies are co-ordinated effectively for the 
clinical needs of the School of Medicine. 

Hopemont Sanitarium, located at Hopemont, Preston County, 40 miles from 
Morgantown, is approved by the American Medical Association tor residency. It 
has 450 beds and is a hospital primarily for pulmonary diseases. A substantial 
number of beds, however, are set aside for purely medical and surgical cases. 
By a special arrangement between the superintendent and staff of the hospital and 
West Virginia University, the School of Medicine has access to the hospital for 
teaching purposes and the superintendent and members of the staff become Univer- 
sity officials. This arrangement provides an excellent affiliation for instruction in 
examination of the sick, with particular reference to pulmonary diseases. 

By special arrangements, students of the School of Medicine also have access 
to clinical facilities of the following institutions for instruction in physical diagnosis, 
medicine, and surgery: Monongalia General Hospital, with a bed capacity of 100; 
and Vincent Pallotti Hospital, a private general hospital with a bed capacity of 90. 

Intramural Clinics. With the cooperation of members of the local medical 
profession, ambulatory cases are available for examination and demonstration. 

Autopsy Service and Pathological Museum. Under an agreement with the 
coroner of Monongalia County, the Department of Pathology of the School of Med- 
icine performs and records coroner's autopsies. Autopsies are available also for teach- 
ing purposes from Vincent Pallotti Hospital, Monongalia General Hospital, and 
Hopemont Sanitarium. This arrangement materially augments the pathological 
museum, which already numbers about 1,400 specimens, and affords opportunity for 
teaching in gross pathology and medical jurisprudence, besides assuring authoritative 
records for medico-legal purposes. 

Buildings and Equipment 

The three-story Medical Building furnishes room for most of the School of 
Medicine. On the first floor are the offices of the Dean, a general lecture room, 
a reading and study room, and the pharmacological laboratory. On the second 
floor are laboratories for bacteriology and physiology. On the third floor are 
laboratories for gross and microscopic anatomy, a large lecture room, and the X-ray 
room. All departments have appropriate offices, technical rooms, and storage space. 
Embalming and cadaver storage rooms are in the basement. Quarters for experi- 
mental animals are provided in separate buildings. 

The biochemical laboratory occupies rooms in the Chemistry Building. The de- 
partment office is Room 430; communicating with it are three rooms used as 
stock and preparation rooms and for research. 

The Department of Pathology occupies rooms on the second floor of the Univer- 
sity Health Center; a good-sized laboratory-lecture room and the necessary rooms 
lor a museum, preparations, storage, offices, and private laboratories. 

Library 

The Medical Library is not organized as a separate unit but is